Question ≥ 6 years warranty on an SSD?

May 12, 2020
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To the extent of my knowledge, Samsung gave 10 years of warranty on its SSD 850 Pro in the past (and there could have been limitations on how to exercise your rights out this warranty). Samsung doesn't do it for its new drives any more if I see it right. Are there other companies that still provide a long warranty of, say, at least 6 years for their SSD drives nowadays? I look for a 1 TB, SATA III, 2.5 inch drive, to be used on a very long term basis as a primary drive in a laptop or in laptops. I prefer endurance/reliability over speed.
 
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tennis2

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I hope you're not substituting a belief that a longer warranty gives you some immunity from failures and not practicing good backup habits.....

Is this an enterprise-level machine or simply personal use?

Honestly, if this is for personal use, I think you're being overly paranoid. As long as you stick with a well-known manufacturer, just buy something.

If for enterprise:
https://www.newegg.com/p/pl?N=100011695 4814 600038463 600038519 600415862
Enterprise SSDs typically up the ante from 1.5M hours MTBF to 2M hours.
 
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Endurance is how many updates you can do to a ssd before you exhaust the number of available nand updates.
Endurance used to be a problem when a ssd size was 40gb.
Today with 500gb or 1tb drives it is no longer a practical issue.
The drive will be long obsolete long before you ever run out of updates in even a heavy desktop environment.
If you want longer endurance, you can buy the PRO versions of samsung ssd drives.
A better solution would be to buy a 2tb version.

Component failure is always a possibility with any device.
If you value any data, provide for EXTERNAL backup.

I think the major ssd makers like intel or samsung will give you better odds on reliability.
Since they make their own components, they can do a better job of quality control.
 
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longer warranty gives you some immunity from failures
Not immunity, but if I suffer from a failure, at least I won't suffer from the additional loss of $$.

overly paranoid.
I very much hope that I am overly paranoid. In fact, if a drive fails, the time I'd need for reinstallation and setting up two operating systems on a dual-boot laptop anew with all the applications and licensing issues on a new drive is several full working days: my backups are just backups of data, not one-to-one copies of drives (which are impossible to do on a running system anyway), and they are performed manually. So, reliability is very worth to be strived for; ideally, I need 10 years.
 
You can buy a usb to sata adapter cable and a samsung ssd.
Then, run the samsung ssd migration app to copy your windows C drive to the ssd.
In the event of a drive failure, you can install your backup and start your data recovery from there.
This only works for a windows C drive.
If your second operating system is something else, there are clone utilities that will make a copy of your os drive which can be a basis for forward recovery of data.
Macrium reflect is one of the better ones.
 

USAFRet

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Not immunity, but if I suffer from a failure, at least I won't suffer from the additional loss of $$.


I very much hope that I am overly paranoid. In fact, if a drive fails, the time I'd need for reinstallation and setting up two operating systems on a dual-boot laptop anew with all the applications and licensing issues on a new drive is several full working days: my backups are just backups of data, not one-to-one copies of drives (which are impossible to do on a running system anyway), and they are performed manually. So, reliability is very worth to be strived for; ideally, I need 10 years.
Done properly, recovering from a rational backup routine need take no more than an hour or two.
Seriously. I've done it personally.

Full drive backups, not just selected data.
I use Macrium Reflect in my daily operation.

Recovering a 1TB drive that is 2/3 full takes a little under 2 hours, across a standard gigabit LAN.

Yes, I've done this, recovering from the failed 960GB Sandisk drive noted earlier.

Macrium will do Full and Incremental images from a currently running drive.
That is the basis for my whole backup scenario.

No need to reinstall and do all those applications and settings again.
Full drive backups.

 
May 12, 2020
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You can buy a usb to sata adapter cable and a samsung ssd.
Then, run the samsung ssd migration app to copy your windows C drive to the ssd.
In the event of a drive failure, you can install your backup and start your data recovery from there.
This only works for a windows C drive.
If your second operating system is something else, there are clone utilities that will make a copy of your os drive which can be a basis for forward recovery of data.
Macrium reflect is one of the better ones.
Sure. But let's discuss backups in a different thread, as it's an issue of its own. For example, the next question would be how long does it take a human to create a backup of a Windows+Debian system with several partitions (Windows reserved, Windows system, Windows users' data, grub /boot, linux swap, linux root, linux /home, linux /var), and I'm afraid the answer is not as simple and is going to be a topic on its own. So, let's not discuss backups here, but concentrate on the question asked.
 
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no more than an hour or two.
Does this time include solving potential licensing issues with Windows, MSOffice, and AutoCAD when they see a new drive? Luckily, I don't know it myself, but I'm afraid you might need the folks from MS or Autodesk on a chat/phone line for this, so, there might be some portion of time which is potentially outside your control. Anyhow, let's discuss backups in a thread of its own. I plan to start a "how to back up a dual-boot system"-thread in short, so please bear with me a little. As for this thread, let's solve the original question posted here.

across a standard gigabit LAN.
This assumes you have a second suitable machine. Not everyone has it. I don't have a suitable one (IBM T42 doesn't count).
 

tennis2

Dignified
Even if 2.5" SATA is compatible with systems 9 years from now, would you really want a future replacement drive that's 5-9 years behind everything else? (not to mention that SATA SSDs are already offering lower performance than NVMe drives today).

Or are you suggesting this as a money issue? That having a drive with a >5 year (industry standard) warranty will prevent you from having to buy a new drive in the event of a failure in years 6-9?
But, as you can see in the case of the enterprise based SSDs, you're paying a significant price premium to even have that extended warranty anyway. A 1TB "consumer tier" SSD these days costs $120-$140, enterprise versions are basically double that. So you could buy 2 "consumer tier" SSDs with 5 year warranties (and reap the performance benefits from the next 5 years of technological advancements) for the cost of one enterprise SSD.
 

USAFRet

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Does this time include solving potential licensing issues with Windows, MSOffice, and AutoCAD when they see a new drive? Luckily, I don't know it myself, but I'm afraid you might need the folks from MS or Autodesk on a chat/phone line for this, so, there might be some portion of time which is potentially outside your control. Anyhow, let's discuss backups in a thread of its own. I plan to start a "how to back up a dual-boot system"-thread in short, so please bear with me a little. As for this thread, let's solve the original question posted here.
There is zero licensing issues. Windows, Office, AutoCAD, whatever.
The Image is a full representation of the drive as it is. All data, all software.

Recovering that Image to a new drive incurs exactly zero licensing issues.

I have done this personally.
 

USAFRet

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Windows/Office/AutoCAD, or my selected CAD tool Rhino3D...do not care about the drive serial number or type.
Windows, for example, only cares about the motherboard.

Of course, there may some few odd esoteric tools that tie directly a specific drive and its serial number. Those are feww and far between.
 
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10 years for an 850 Pro; assuming a failure occurs, assuming you've not exhausted the rated TBW allotted.... it would seem they would owe the owner 'something'!
I saw it being sold it only as "MZ-7KE1T0BW". Samsung said that the ending "BW" means that if your drive fails, you don't Samsung contact directly, but the seller who contacts Samsung. If we believe this, Samsung doesn't own the owner anything directly. Can anyone confirm or reject this?
 

USAFRet

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I saw it being sold it only as "MZ-7KE1T0BW". Samsung said that the ending "BW" means that if your drive fails, you don't Samsung contact directly, but the seller who contacts Samsung. If we believe this, Samsung doesn't own the owner anything directly. Can anyone confirm or reject this?
The warranty info from Samsung makes no distinction like that.
 

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