News 1 Petabyte Tape Cartridges: Fujifilm Plans for the Future With New Material

spongiemaster

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Both Epsilon Ferrite and F-MIMR are fairly new technologies, so Fujifilm does not expect to use them commercially for about 15 years.
15 years? It took us less than half that time to develop the atomic bomb and land on the moon. Besides Half-Life 3, how many things are in development for 15 years?
 
15 years? It took us less than half that time to develop the atomic bomb and land on the moon. Besides Half-Life 3, how many things are in development for 15 years?
What would be their motivation for rushing development? An accelerated development process would likely cost a lot more to achieve a similar result, and would just move them closer to the point where improvements in density slow to a halt. Unlike those kinds of government programs, a company like this needs the end result to be profitable.

Though I must say, the article is a bit nonsensical, reporting on a tech company's plans for 15 years down the line. These kinds of articles tends to not age all that well as things often get delayed or modified. In 15 years, how many of the company's employees will even be working there still? Fujifilm might even be merged into some other company or sell off their tape storage division by then. Or maybe some alternate technology will be developed that makes tape storage obsolete by that point.
 

GenericUser

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Besides Half-Life 3, how many things are in development for 15 years?
I was going to say Duke Nukem Forever, but that was only 14 years. And for what we got for it...

As for the HL3, I think Valve gave up on that a long time ago, for the variety of speculated reasons floating around for it. A man can dream though.
 

spongiemaster

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What would be their motivation for rushing development? An accelerated development process would likely cost a lot more to achieve a similar result, and would just move them closer to the point where improvements in density slow to a halt. Unlike those kinds of government programs, a company like this needs the end result to be profitable.
And you think it would be easier to get a return on development costs by dragging it out 15 years? Who has a roadmap that long? Think about how many companies have dropped out of the storage market in the last 15 years.
 
And you think it would be easier to get a return on development costs by dragging it out 15 years? Who has a roadmap that long? Think about how many companies have dropped out of the storage market in the last 15 years.
A lot of this is going to be down to gradual refinements of the process over time. Sure, it might be possible for them to move quicker, but again, the total development costs would likely be higher, at least in the short term, and tape storage is ultimately all about providing storage at the lowest possible cost. As long as they manage to keep up with, or stay slightly ahead of the competition, they don't have much incentive to rapidly push development forward. Companies are going to buy their product either way. And if they did rush development, only to find that some alternate technology made what they developed obsolete, they wouldn't have the option of shifting their course of development down the line to something that would be more practical, potentially resulting in money wasted on developing something they won't be using.
 

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