$100,000 If You Can Prove Quantum Computers Impossible

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wiyosaya

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Sorry, but this is a bunch of crap, IMHO. I'll liken proving quantum computing impossible to proving psychic phenomena is true - both are something that cannot be done within the bounds of current scientific capabilities. So, this award is crap. They are only offering it to 1, make a name for themselves, and 2, because they know it is impossible and therefore their money is safe.
 

irh_1974

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Ahhhh, the old "You Can't Prove A Negative" arguement, I can see this decending into theology at any moment, people chunnering on about Russells Teapot or the Flying Spagetti Monster.
 

madjimms

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You guys do realize he is doing this so people will TRY to prove him wrong and ADVANCE the science behind it right? Hes trolling you guys & you fell for it! LOL!
 

lashabane

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[citation][nom]irh_1974[/nom]Ahhhh, the old "You Can't Prove A Negative" arguement, I can see this decending into theology at any moment, people chunnering on about Russells Teapot or the Flying Spagetti Monster.[/citation]
Don't you be talking bad about my beloved Flying Spaghetti Monster.
 

lamorpa

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Is the Scott Aaaronson referred to in the first paragraph the same person as the Scott Aaronson referred to in the rest of the article? Maybe it's some sort of rating? Scott Aaa Ronson vs. Scott Aa Ronson? Is there a Scott Aronson or Scott Ronson of a lower rating?
 

jellico

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This is a sucker's bet. It is fundamental logic that you CANNOT prove a negative. Something is only impossible until it is not.
 
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If I can Prove Quantum Computers is Impossible. $100,000 is not enough for me to pay for my debt for the equipment I purchase for the experiment,
 

alidan

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[citation][nom]oh_no[/nom]An MIT "researcher" ?Wow, you can't prove a negative.What an idiot.[/citation]
i can prove that 1+1 does not equal 3

im assuming that the same principals are at work... you also have to imagine that if you wanted to get a government grant for quantum computer research would be a hell of allot easier to get if you could also say that the greatest minds in the world are working to disprove the possibilities, so far they have come up with nothing.
 
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I'm not sure why so many people think you can't prove a negative. Spend ten minutes googling and you'll realise that's not correct. You are referring to unfalsifiable claims (which is where the flying spagetti monster comes in), which by definition cannot be disproven, but that does not mean every claim is unfalsifiable.

Google 'the halting problem' if you want a computing example of a proof of impossibility.

 

stingstang

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Easy for a quantum professor. Simply state why what we know consider a "Quantum Computer" doesn't have anything to do with quantum physics. Wish I could understand it just a little better.... I know that much, though.
 

dimar

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Creation of a functional and scalable quantum computer is impossible in alternate universes where quantum state does not exist. Now where's my money?
 

mildgamer001

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you can prove a negative. For this particular example, try EVERY (and i mean EVERY) possible way of creating the thing, if none work, it is impossible, there just proved its impossible, mind Furked yet mr you cant prove a negative?
 
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The way to disprove a Quantum Computer with certainty is to demonstrate the Copenhagen 'interpretation' of of Quantum Mechanics is not correct. The way to prove Quantum Mechanics is not correct is to notice there is no 'mechanics' in Quantum Mechanics, it's mostly pushed math, anyone to says elsewise needs to rationally explain exactly how "Renormalization" is mathematically valid. The man who invented Quantum Mechanics renormalization (Richard P. Feynman) could not, he said it was a 'dippy process'.
 
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