[SOLVED] 100 Mbps via direct connection(PC), 300 Mbps via router(router to PC) - How come?

Nov 20, 2021
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Hi,
I have a 300 Mbps connection from my ISP.
When I connect the ethernet cable directly to the PC, the network adapter is capped at 100 Mbps but when I connect the ISP cable to the router and then to the PC, I get full 300 Mbps. (The speed & duplex option is set to full 1.0 Gbps, motherboard and router both support Gbps speeds).
How is this possible?
Can someone help me?

Router : TP-Link Archer C6 V3
Motherboard : Gigabyte B450M

Thank you
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
Hi,
I have a 300 Mbps connection from my ISP.
When I connect the ethernet cable directly to the PC, the network adapter is capped at 100 Mbps but when I connect the ISP cable to the router and then to the PC, I get full 300 Mbps. (The speed & duplex option is set to full 1.0 Gbps, motherboard and router both support Gbps speeds).
How is this possible?
Can someone help me?

Router : TP-Link Archer C6 V3
Motherboard : Gigabyte B450M

Thank you
Your PC doesn't tolerate the marginal cable as well as the router does. Speed issues like this are almost 100% cable problems.
 
What kind of internet do you have. Almost no internet other than maybe something resold by a apartment can come in via ethernet. The limit is 100 meters so ISP can not use ethernet to deliver service. There must be some other kind of cable running to the house connected to some kind of modem. Any connection past the modem would be your responsibility not the ISP.
 
Nov 20, 2021
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What kind of internet do you have. Almost no internet other than maybe something resold by a apartment can come in via ethernet. The limit is 100 meters so ISP can not use ethernet to deliver service. There must be some other kind of cable running to the house connected to some kind of modem. Any connection past the modem would be your responsibility not the ISP.
Yes I mean, there’s a switch/box in my apartment from which all the other connections to other houses divide to. And one of the connections is to my house. I don’t know if that switch/box is called the modem.
 
Then maybe the ISP will replace it. Unless it runs outside or is very long I would just buy it yourself rather than having to deal with the ISP and having appointments for a tech to come. Be careful to buy quality cable. You need cat5e or better if it is cheaper. The cable must be pure copper (no CCA) and have wire size 22-24 no flat or thin cables. There is lots of this fake cable being sold because it is cheaper because it has less copper metal which is at record high prices. Pretty much all reputably vendors will clearly mark the specs in their advertising and on the cable itself so you know it is valid cable.
 
Nov 20, 2021
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Then maybe the ISP will replace it. Unless it runs outside or is very long I would just buy it yourself rather than having to deal with the ISP and having appointments for a tech to come. Be careful to buy quality cable. You need cat5e or better if it is cheaper. The cable must be pure copper (no CCA) and have wire size 22-24 no flat or thin cables. There is lots of this fake cable being sold because it is cheaper because it has less copper metal which is at record high prices. Pretty much all reputably vendors will clearly mark the specs in their advertising and on the cable itself so you know it is valid cable.
Alright, I’ll try asking my ISP. They might deny as it’s a cost issue for them. Let’s see.
I’m attaching the picture of the current ISP cable I have in use (if you zoom in close, it says CAT5E):
Current Wire in use
I have another long cable kept(the same here CAT5e:
Spare cable
Sorry for the bad images, but is there any difference between the 2 cables?
 
All you can do is try it. Cat5e actually means very little. It really should say Eia/TIA on the side. Most times you will see the letter CU which means its copper and a marking likely say 23AWG. Those are the important things.

The cable is very hard to read but what has me concerned is does it say 2PR. If it only has 2 pair of wires you will only get 100m.

What you might try first move your pc near the jack and use a short cable. You want the pc set to AUTO and not hard set to gigabit. Some devices get confused when one end is set to auto (ie the router which you can't likely change) and the pc.
 
Nov 20, 2021
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Guys, thank you for your help. The ISP solved the issue by shifting the location of the source of my wire to a box/switch which was close to my house. So I guess the length was the issue.
 

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