[SOLVED] 1000VA/6000W UPS with 600W PSU and 350W system usage.

Jun 26, 2019
10
0
10
0
Good day to you.
I 'm going to buy 1000va/600w line interactive UPS on this system with 750w PSU.
https://pcpartpicker.com/list/
is it ok?
I don't think that this system will use more than 450W on a full load.
BTW is Pcparkpicker accurate in terms of showing approximate woltage?

i've heard that the best scenario for PSU is when it's load is at somewhere half.
i'm more worrid about UPS I'm chosing, because of its 600W.
 
Last edited:

freercurse

Commendable
Dec 16, 2016
189
7
1,715
22
also something to lookout for on a UPS is how long you wish for your system to run after a powercut,
do you wish for 30 mins to clear everything up or just for your PC to automatically soft shutdown
 
Reactions: NozZ

Aeacus

Illustrious
Herald
When looking for an UPS, there are 2 things to look out:
  1. Output waveform (square wave, simulated sine wave and true/pure sine wave)
  2. Design (stand-by, line-interactive and online)
From here you can read about the differences between output waveform,
link: http://www.minutemanups.com/support/pwr_un10.php

And here are explanations about the UPS design,
link: https://www.eetimes.com/document.asp?doc_id=1272971

Waveform and design
For PCs, line-interactive UPS would be more than enough since PSUs can easily handle the 2ms to 5ms transfer time of line-interactive UPS.
As far as output waveform goes, true/pure sine wave UPS is best used. While simulated sine wave UPSes are cheaper than true/pure sine wave UPSes, PSUs with Active PFC aren't compatible with simulated sine wave. You might get simulated sine wave UPS running with Active PFC PSU but there can be some major issues. Here's what, how and why.

How do you know which PSUs have Active PFC and which ones don't?
Simple, every PSU that has 80+ certification (e.g 80+ Bronze or 80+ Gold) has Active PFC.

What is Active PFC?
Further reading: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_factor#Power_factor_correction_(PFC)_in_non-linear_loads

What can happen when using simulated sine wave UPS with Active PFC PSU?
When simulated sine wave UPS switches over to the battery power, one of 3 things can happen:
  1. UPS displays error resulting PC to shut down immediately.
  2. UPS shuts down resulting PC to shut down immediately.
  3. UPS switches to battery power resulting PC to power off from UPS (PC stays on).
Why it happens?
Simulated sine wave UPS produces a zero output state during the phase change cycle resulting in a power “gap”. This gap may cause power interruption for active PFC PSUs when switching from AC power output to simulated sine wave output (battery mode).

What to do next?
As stated above, your PC can run off from simulated sine wave UPS but be prepared when you face issues with it. When issues do rise, your best bet would be returning the simulated sine wave UPS and getting true/pure sine wave UPS. Or you can go with true/pure sine wave UPS off the bat.

Wattage
As far as UPS wattage goes, you need to consider the power draw of your PC and monitor. Maybe speakers and wi-fi router too if you plan to plug those into the UPS as well. Though, printers, scanners and other such hardware (full list on your UPS manual) don't plug to the UPS since their startup power draw is way too much for UPS to handle and you can fry your UPS.

Taking PSU's max wattage as a baseline is good idea since it will give your UPS more headroom and you can get longer runtime out of your UPS. Since your PSU is 750W, your monitor is added on top of it. Since your monitor power consumption is 50W, 800W UPS would be enough for your PC. But you can get by with lower capacity UPS as well if you're willing to sacrifice UPS'es runtime.

UPS selection
Good UPS brands to go for are CyberPower, TrippLite and APC. While there are other UPS brands as well, those three are the best out there. Also, the more powerful UPS you have, the longer UPS can keep your PC running before it's battery is empty.

While the Kstar KS-UA100 UPS you selected is enough capacity wise for your PC (your PC at max load consumes about 320W + monitor at 50W = 370W), where the UPS fails, is in it's output waveform. That Kstar KS-UA100 UPS outputs simulated sine wave and as you've read above, simulated sine wave isn't compatible with Active PFC, which your PSU has.

That being said, i'd go with true/pure sine wave UPS, e.g Kstar KS-UB10 (1000VA/900W, true/pure sine wave, online),
link: https://www.nivo.co.za/buy~kstar.memopower.series.ks.ub10.1.000va.online.ups~p59402

With 900W capacity UPS, at 370W load, you should have about 15 mins of runtime on your UPS.

UPS pricing
Though, it seems that you've greatly underestimated the cost of a proper, good quality UPS. Since UPS'es job is to keep your PC running when there's blackout by supplying good and stable electricity to your PC, they also cost a lot of money.

For example, i payed €230 Euros for one of my CyberPower CP1300EPFCLCD (1300VA/780W, true/pure sine wave, line-interactive) UPS. That makes R 3,710.63 in your currency while you're currently looking at UPS that costs R 1,138.99. And i have two UPSes in use, one for Skylake build and another for Haswell build (full specs with pics in my sig).

Since your PC is expensive, it's not easily replaced. Like it or not, if you want the protection, it's not going to be cheap. Though, if you want cheap and good UPS, you need to buy 2x UPSes; 1st the cheap one and 2nd the good one.

Other questions
The Gigabyte MoBo you picked will do fine. Since it's Z-series, you can OC your K-series CPU with it as well.

But what doesn't do is the CPU cooler. Hyper 212 Evo is a poor excuse for a CPU cooler and it's a bad idea to put it on i7-9700K CPU, especially when you OC your CPU. With that hot running Core i7, i'd go with big-sized CPU cooler, e.g Be Quiet! Dark Rock Pro 3,
pcpp: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/9bFPxr/be-quiet-cpu-cooler-bk019

Btw, you're missing PC case from your pcpp list. Also, Dark Rock Pro 3 is 163mm tall, so, depending on which PC case you're going with, it may not fit.
 
Jun 26, 2019
10
0
10
0
When looking for an UPS, there are 2 things to look out:
  1. Output waveform (square wave, simulated sine wave and true/pure sine wave)
  2. Design (stand-by, line-interactive and online)
From here you can read about the differences between output waveform,
link: http://www.minutemanups.com/support/pwr_un10.php

And here are explanations about the UPS design,
link: https://www.eetimes.com/document.asp?doc_id=1272971

Waveform and design
For PCs, line-interactive UPS would be more than enough since PSUs can easily handle the 2ms to 5ms transfer time of line-interactive UPS.
As far as output waveform goes, true/pure sine wave UPS is best used. While simulated sine wave UPSes are cheaper than true/pure sine wave UPSes, PSUs with Active PFC aren't compatible with simulated sine wave. You might get simulated sine wave UPS running with Active PFC PSU but there can be some major issues. Here's what, how and why.

How do you know which PSUs have Active PFC and which ones don't?
Simple, every PSU that has 80+ certification (e.g 80+ Bronze or 80+ Gold) has Active PFC.

What is Active PFC?
Further reading: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_factor#Power_factor_correction_(PFC)_in_non-linear_loads

What can happen when using simulated sine wave UPS with Active PFC PSU?
When simulated sine wave UPS switches over to the battery power, one of 3 things can happen:
  1. UPS displays error resulting PC to shut down immediately.
  2. UPS shuts down resulting PC to shut down immediately.
  3. UPS switches to battery power resulting PC to power off from UPS (PC stays on).
Why it happens?
Simulated sine wave UPS produces a zero output state during the phase change cycle resulting in a power “gap”. This gap may cause power interruption for active PFC PSUs when switching from AC power output to simulated sine wave output (battery mode).

What to do next?
As stated above, your PC can run off from simulated sine wave UPS but be prepared when you face issues with it. When issues do rise, your best bet would be returning the simulated sine wave UPS and getting true/pure sine wave UPS. Or you can go with true/pure sine wave UPS off the bat.

Wattage
As far as UPS wattage goes, you need to consider the power draw of your PC and monitor. Maybe speakers and wi-fi router too if you plan to plug those into the UPS as well. Though, printers, scanners and other such hardware (full list on your UPS manual) don't plug to the UPS since their startup power draw is way too much for UPS to handle and you can fry your UPS.

Taking PSU's max wattage as a baseline is good idea since it will give your UPS more headroom and you can get longer runtime out of your UPS. Since your PSU is 750W, your monitor is added on top of it. Since your monitor power consumption is 50W, 800W UPS would be enough for your PC. But you can get by with lower capacity UPS as well if you're willing to sacrifice UPS'es runtime.

UPS selection
Good UPS brands to go for are CyberPower, TrippLite and APC. While there are other UPS brands as well, those three are the best out there. Also, the more powerful UPS you have, the longer UPS can keep your PC running before it's battery is empty.

While the Kstar KS-UA100 UPS you selected is enough capacity wise for your PC (your PC at max load consumes about 320W + monitor at 50W = 370W), where the UPS fails, is in it's output waveform. That Kstar KS-UA100 UPS outputs simulated sine wave and as you've read above, simulated sine wave isn't compatible with Active PFC, which your PSU has.

That being said, i'd go with true/pure sine wave UPS, e.g Kstar KS-UB10 (1000VA/900W, true/pure sine wave, online),
link: https://www.nivo.co.za/buy~kstar.memopower.series.ks.ub10.1.000va.online.ups~p59402

With 900W capacity UPS, at 370W load, you should have about 15 mins of runtime on your UPS.

UPS pricing
Though, it seems that you've greatly underestimated the cost of a proper, good quality UPS. Since UPS'es job is to keep your PC running when there's blackout by supplying good and stable electricity to your PC, they also cost a lot of money.

For example, i payed €230 Euros for one of my CyberPower CP1300EPFCLCD (1300VA/780W, true/pure sine wave, line-interactive) UPS. That makes R 3,710.63 in your currency while you're currently looking at UPS that costs R 1,138.99. And i have two UPSes in use, one for Skylake build and another for Haswell build (full specs with pics in my sig).

Since your PC is expensive, it's not easily replaced. Like it or not, if you want the protection, it's not going to be cheap. Though, if you want cheap and good UPS, you need to buy 2x UPSes; 1st the cheap one and 2nd the good one.

Other questions
The Gigabyte MoBo you picked will do fine. Since it's Z-series, you can OC your K-series CPU with it as well.

But what doesn't do is the CPU cooler. Hyper 212 Evo is a poor excuse for a CPU cooler and it's a bad idea to put it on i7-9700K CPU, especially when you OC your CPU. With that hot running Core i7, i'd go with big-sized CPU cooler, e.g Be Quiet! Dark Rock Pro 3,
pcpp: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/9bFPxr/be-quiet-cpu-cooler-bk019

Btw, you're missing PC case from your pcpp list. Also, Dark Rock Pro 3 is 163mm tall, so, depending on which PC case you're going with, it may not fit.
Thanks you very much for such an informative answer. Sadly I already bought The UPS. As I mentioned above there are no good quality mid-range UPS-s in my country. I'm from Georgia BTW. I gave you a random link with my UPS on English Language.
I'll definitely change it as soon as possible then. I read some articles and find out that quite a lot of people have such combo as i have and hope that they iwon't have any issues in a near future.
as for 212 - evo. I didn't thought it was such a bad cooler. I've watched some youtube videos and people were talking about it quite nicely. So i decided to buy it. MY BAD //>
i will monitor My CPU health and temperatures very often and will try to buy better cooler ASAP.
Tnx again )
 

Aeacus

Illustrious
Herald
For UPS, it's make and model (or part number) would've sufficed. Linking a store tells us that it's your local store from where you're looking to buy it and you'll get suggestions based on what is available in there and/or in that country (that store is located in South Africa). So, there's that.

By "such combo", you mean Tt DPS G PSU + Kstar simulated sine wave UPS? If so, keep in mind that only success stories are posted. I don't think anyone would be proud saying that they bought simulated sine wave UPS and it ended up not working with their PC. With only success stories out there, there could be very well 10 people who got it working while 1000 people didn't.

Hyper 212 Evo is praised because it's cheap. But if you'd know even a little bit about life, you should know that good and cheap products doesn't exist. If you want a good and cheap product (in this case, a CPU cooler), you need to buy 2x products: 1st the cheap one and 2nd the good one.

For a mid-sized CPU cooler, provided that you don't OC your CPU, you can also go with Arctic Freezer 33 (150mm tall, no RAM clearance issue, support for push-pull, comes with semi-passive fan),
specs: https://www.arctic.ac/eu_en/freezer-33.html

In my Skylake build, i have the predecessor of Freezer 33 in use, known as Freezer i32. Since both CPU coolers include semi-passive fan, you'll have 0 dB(A) noise output on low CPU loads. For me, the stock semi-passive fan didn't turn at all until my CPU reached 52°C. And when the fan started to spin, it was very quiet due to the fluid-dynamic bearing. Highest what i saw out of my i5-6600K was 55°C during CinebenchR15 while my CPU idles at 26°C.
Performance wise, Arctic Freezer 33 and i32 have the same cooling performance. Only difference between them is that Freezer i32 only has Intel mounting bracket while Freezer 33 comes with Intel and AMD AM4 mounting brackets.
Freezer i32 review: http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/arctic-freezer-i32-cooler,review-33860.html

When comparing Freezer 33 with Hyper 212 Evo, Freezer 33 has:
  • shorter height (150mm vs 159mm)
  • better fan bearing (fluid-dynamic bearing vs sleeve bearing)
  • far longer longevity for a fan (300.000 hours vs 40.000 hours)
  • a lot longer warranty (6 years vs 2 years)
  • much quieter fan (22 dB(A) vs 36 dB(A))
  • 0 dB(A) noise output (on low loads, fan doesn't turn at all vs constantly turning fan)
  • support for AM4 sockets off the bat (Hyper 212 Evo needs AM4 upgrade kit which you need to buy separately)
Hyper 212 Evo specs as well: http://www.coolermaster.com/cooling/cpu-air-cooler/hyper-212-evo/

There's also an Arctic Freezer 34 that came out short time ago. By the specs, it looks to be improved version of Freezer 33,
specs: https://www.arctic.ac/eu_en/freezer-34.html
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS