Question 1070ti benching incredibly low

Apr 5, 2019
5
0
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Sorry guys I'm basically tech illiterate so if you could help me out I'd really appreciate it.
I've noticed my 1070ti never gets hot even when running games (apex legends) it hovers around 40-45 degrees.
It also sometimes drops 10-20 frames in firefights but this is inconsistent.
I ran benchmarks and found some pretty disappointing results.
View: https://i.imgur.com/NZeZrFM.png

This is with vsync and gsync off

CPU: View: https://i.imgur.com/nalUZyM.png

Memory: View: https://i.imgur.com/ZImvXvK.png


I really appreciate any help thanks.
 
Is your RAM really running as slowly as your benchmark software purports?

That site often returns incorrect frequency information for components, but on the chance that it is correct, it looks like your RAM is configured poorly, which can affect results of games running on Ryzen quite a bit.

Also, it looks like you have overclocked your Ryzen CPU, but only to a point that it's frequency is still lower than it's original turbo frequency. Depending on how well threaded the benchmark or games you run are, if the original boost is higher than your overclock, you can actually hurt performance with a manual Ryzen overclock.
 
Apr 5, 2019
5
0
10
Is your RAM really running as slowly as your benchmark software purports?

That site often returns incorrect frequency information for components, but on the chance that it is correct, it looks like your RAM is configured poorly, which can affect results of games running on Ryzen quite a bit.

Also, it looks like you have overclocked your Ryzen CPU, but only to a point that it's frequency is still lower than it's original turbo frequency. Depending on how well threaded the benchmark or games you run are, if the original boost is higher than your overclock, you can actually hurt performance with a manual Ryzen overclock.
Hey thank you for helping. Is there any way for me to check how well my RAM is configured? Also I didn't manually OC my cpu, there was a preset setting in BIOS which I used to improve the speed.
 
CPU-Z or HWiNFO are both good programs for getting memory information.

The benchmark picture you posted lists your memory as DDR4-3000, but running at DDR4-2133.

2133 is the default speed a lot of motherboards initially boot using as it's a safe speed most likely to POST. If the memory speed was never adjusted for your system after assembly, it's possible you are leaving memory performance on the table.

The easiest solution for most users is to go into UEFI / BIOS (I'll just refer to it as BIOS) and configure the memory to use an XMP profile. This is not a guarantee however, and Ryzen CPUs can be extremely picky about memory, but as it's so easy to try, it should always be the first step in getting memory running at it's best. Be familiar with the steps necessary to reset your BIOS settings however, as incompatible memory settings can make the system fail to boot. This is one of those things you want to get dialed in before the machine is installed into a more permanent location, if you find the memory settings to be finicky, or you like to tweak the settings for best performance, you may find yourself resetting the BIOS often, until you settle on good settings.

Also, since you are running a Ryzen CPU, and the original CPU programming was extremely sensitive to memory configurations, if you haven't already, it is advised you update your BIOS to whatever is most recent, as memory support for Ryzen was improved significantly since launch. It looks like your motherboard has been receiving regular BIOS updates, the latest as of this post being released April 1st, 2019.

The BIOS should be updated before attempting to improve memory performance.

ROG STRIX B350-F Gaming
 
Apr 5, 2019
5
0
10
CPU-Z or HWiNFO are both good programs for getting memory information.

The benchmark picture you posted lists your memory as DDR4-3000, but running at DDR4-2133.

2133 is the default speed a lot of motherboards initially boot using as it's a safe speed most likely to POST. If the memory speed was never adjusted for your system after assembly, it's possible you are leaving memory performance on the table.

The easiest solution for most users is to go into UEFI / BIOS (I'll just refer to it as BIOS) and configure the memory to use an XMP profile. This is not a guarantee however, and Ryzen CPUs can be extremely picky about memory, but as it's so easy to try, it should always be the first step in getting memory running at it's best. Be familiar with the steps necessary to reset your BIOS settings however, as incompatible memory settings can make the system fail to boot. This is one of those things you want to get dialed in before the machine is installed into a more permanent location, if you find the memory settings to be finicky, or you like to tweak the settings for best performance, you may find yourself resetting the BIOS often, until you settle on good settings.

Also, since you are running a Ryzen CPU, and the original CPU programming was extremely sensitive to memory configurations, if you haven't already, it is advised you update your BIOS to whatever is most recent, as memory support for Ryzen was improved significantly since launch. It looks like your motherboard has been receiving regular BIOS updates, the latest as of this post being released April 1st, 2019.

The BIOS should be updated before attempting to improve memory performance.

ROG STRIX B350-F Gaming
I'll be sure to try this. I would have never though of this on my own! I'll try to post the results here as soon as possible. Do you think this has something to do with the low temperature on gpu while gaming?
 
Apr 5, 2019
5
0
10
CPU-Z or HWiNFO are both good programs for getting memory information.

The benchmark picture you posted lists your memory as DDR4-3000, but running at DDR4-2133.

2133 is the default speed a lot of motherboards initially boot using as it's a safe speed most likely to POST. If the memory speed was never adjusted for your system after assembly, it's possible you are leaving memory performance on the table.

The easiest solution for most users is to go into UEFI / BIOS (I'll just refer to it as BIOS) and configure the memory to use an XMP profile. This is not a guarantee however, and Ryzen CPUs can be extremely picky about memory, but as it's so easy to try, it should always be the first step in getting memory running at it's best. Be familiar with the steps necessary to reset your BIOS settings however, as incompatible memory settings can make the system fail to boot. This is one of those things you want to get dialed in before the machine is installed into a more permanent location, if you find the memory settings to be finicky, or you like to tweak the settings for best performance, you may find yourself resetting the BIOS often, until you settle on good settings.

Also, since you are running a Ryzen CPU, and the original CPU programming was extremely sensitive to memory configurations, if you haven't already, it is advised you update your BIOS to whatever is most recent, as memory support for Ryzen was improved significantly since launch. It looks like your motherboard has been receiving regular BIOS updates, the latest as of this post being released April 1st, 2019.

The BIOS should be updated before attempting to improve memory performance.

ROG STRIX B350-F Gaming
These are the results for memory I got in CPU-Z
View: https://i.imgur.com/FNRS4wr.png

Not sure what all the readings mean.
I also went to download the BIOS update but it recommended that I update my chipset to 18.50.16, so I downloaded that as well but when I ran the installer it wanted to install radeon adrenalin addition?? I don't have a radeon card...
Thanks again for your efforts I'm a bit stumped.
 

prince_xaine

Notable
Feb 3, 2018
914
19
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Follow this guide I have written. You should be good to go after this. After completing this guide you could always navigate to this site and install any outdated drivers using their free software: https://www.iobit.com/en/driver-booster.php
----------------------
A. Downloads
----------------------
- Go to this page and download 7zip: (x64 at the top) https://www.7-zip.org/download.html

- Go to this page and download the DDU utility: https://www.guru3d.com/files-get/display-driver-uninstaller-download,19.html

- Go to this page and download the 1070 Ti driver: https://www.geforce.com/drivers/results/145534

----------------------
B. Getting Ready
----------------------
- Extract DDU into a folder of your choice. (You will need to extract it twice)

- In the Windows Search Bar type: msconfig and hit enter

- Navigate on the boot tab, select safe mode with networking, then reboot

----------------------
C. Final Steps
----------------------
- Navigate to the location of DDU and run it. Remove all existing drivers but do not change any other settings - do not reboot!

- Navigate to the location of the graphics card driver you installed and run it.

= After completing the above tasks reboot again. You should be good to go.
 

Serinox

Prominent
Jun 23, 2017
204
2
765
Sorry guys I'm basically tech illiterate so if you could help me out I'd really appreciate it.
I've noticed my 1070ti never gets hot even when running games (apex legends) it hovers around 40-45 degrees.
It also sometimes drops 10-20 frames in firefights but this is inconsistent.
I ran benchmarks and found some pretty disappointing results.
View: https://i.imgur.com/NZeZrFM.png

This is with vsync and gsync off

CPU: View: https://i.imgur.com/nalUZyM.png

Memory: View: https://i.imgur.com/ZImvXvK.png


I really appreciate any help thanks.
I suspect that your gpu is only running in pcie x4 mode. Install gpu-z and run something to load (e.g youtube, gpu benchmark) your gpu while watching the link speed. It should show pci-e 3 x16 mode when stressed.

Maybe you installed the gpu on the wrong slot. Usually the full size slot closest to the cpu is the fastest. The other slots often are sharing lanes with sata or m2 or don't offer 16 lanes in the first place.
 
The CPU-Z screen shot looks accurate for what I would expect if your RAM was installed and not configured further. For our purposes, the key metric is the DRAM Frequency of 1064.1 MHz, which pretty much coincides with what your benchmark reported. The other numbers are interesting if you want to look them up sometime, but I wouldn't worry too much about them unless you have to manually enter values. If you take the DRAM frequency and multiply it by 2, you end up with 2128.2, which is darn close to the theoretical 2133 standard, so there is nothing technically wrong with the setting your machine is reporting, it's just slower than the memory is rated for. The benchmark incorrectly uses MHz for the units with 2133, when it should actually be MT/s (MegaTransfers per second.) DDR memory is measured in MT/s, and this is roughly double the actual frequency the memory is clocked at.

Your RAM, appears to be rated at 3000 MT/s, which would mean running it at ~1500 MHz, up from the current 1064, so almost a %41 performance increase for some memory use cases, if you can run your memory stable at that speed. A reasonable, rough estimate return to expect from this would be between 4 - 9 FPS increase in some games.

While another 5+ FPS should better utilize your GPU, this is highly unlikely to explain why your GPU is running at such a low temperature while gaming. The easiest answer for that is likely going to be, because the GPU is being underutilized due to a mis-configuration somewhere, either in your NVIDIA software, or your game.

Of course, there are times when 3rd party software conflicts with running games, so if you have any temperature or fan monitoring software, or really anything other than the Windows Task Manager running, you need to remember to test both with and without it running to make certain it isn't the cause of degraded performance.

I highly doubt your low GPU temperature is a result of running in the wrong PCIe mode. The worst that could have happened is for the graphics card to be installed into slots PCIEx16_2 or PCIEx16_3 on your motherboard, but you would still get PCIe x4 connectivity, and at either 3.0 or 2.0 versioning, which at worst will lose you 4 - 13% performance, again, not enough to cause the symptoms you've described. The effects of PCIe lanes and versioning have been fairly well demonstrated in the past, and under most conditions you lose marginal FPS. Here's some further reading on the subject if you find that sort of thing interesting: Gamer's Nexus article ; TechPowerUp article. On the other hand, if your graphics card is installed in a x16 slot other than the one nearest the CPU, that certainly isn't any more ideal than running your RAM modules slower than they are rated, and you would want to address that by moving it to the most suitable expansion slot, PCIEx16_1.

18.50.16.01 drivers from ASUS
 

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