[SOLVED] 1080 rog strix vs 1080ti ref.

Oct 31, 2018
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Hey Guys. Ive gotten 2 decent offer, one is 1080strix, only 1 month old, reciept and warrenty for i DKKR=457 dollars vs 1080ti reference blower card With No warrenty, 9months old used 8-10hours a week cleaned often and used in non smoking enviroment.
For 533 dollars in DKKR.

Im unsure as what to choose, because i want most value for My money, With the ti, i Also get an ekwg ek-fc 1080 gtx waterblock included om the side as a del sweetener, in the price. Which i plan to sell and get an aftermarket air cooler for.

Would appreciate Any advice and opinion on the matter.

Mind that i live in denmark, and cards are slightly more costly here. Thank you in avance.
 

Eximo

Titan
Herald
1080Ti is certainly going to be the faster card. Reference boards are actually decent in the Pascal line. Lower temperature is the key to overclocking them as well, not so much power delivery. Most cards peak at around 2100-2150Mhz when overclocked.

If it comes with a water block, all you need is a pump/res/radiator and a few fittings to water cool it. Depending on what you can sell the block for vs what an aftermarket air cooler will cost, might be a toss up. My personal favorite is expensive, but also gets you a water cooled CPU. Swiftech H240-X version 2. Pump/Res/Rad and CPU block all included and you can just take the loop apart, add the GPU with a few fittings, and you have a water cooled system.

No hassle to get the Strix though. If you are running a 1080p monitor they are both overkill. 2560x1440 @ 60hz and the GTX1080 is more then enough. Really only 3440x1440 or 2560x1440@144hz or 4K@60hz where the 1080Ti will gain an advantage. Not accounting for future demands though.
 

Eximo

Titan
Herald
1080Ti is certainly going to be the faster card. Reference boards are actually decent in the Pascal line. Lower temperature is the key to overclocking them as well, not so much power delivery. Most cards peak at around 2100-2150Mhz when overclocked.

If it comes with a water block, all you need is a pump/res/radiator and a few fittings to water cool it. Depending on what you can sell the block for vs what an aftermarket air cooler will cost, might be a toss up. My personal favorite is expensive, but also gets you a water cooled CPU. Swiftech H240-X version 2. Pump/Res/Rad and CPU block all included and you can just take the loop apart, add the GPU with a few fittings, and you have a water cooled system.

No hassle to get the Strix though. If you are running a 1080p monitor they are both overkill. 2560x1440 @ 60hz and the GTX1080 is more then enough. Really only 3440x1440 or 2560x1440@144hz or 4K@60hz where the 1080Ti will gain an advantage. Not accounting for future demands though.
 
Oct 31, 2018
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Thanks for the input. The reason im upgrading is that i bought a New Monitor, its a 27" 1440p 144hz Ips panel, so the reign of My gtx 970 is coming to an end.

So, what i hear you say is that the best value for me here is the ti, because it Will get me the better performance at this resolution at 100+ Hz? And I Will be better off a while longer i to the future, rater than the 1080.

I had been wondering though, is the pcb/base of reference card just as good as, let say a strix, if you Change the cooling? I mean, if you pulled everything off of two identical gpu an fitted Them With the same cooling, would they in theory be equally good? I know, silicone lotteri n All.
 

Eximo

Titan
Herald
Well, it does depend on the specific GPU you end up with, yes. I am referencing averages from what I have helped people to achieve, my own results, and what many people have posted asking if their overclocks were good.

You can't directly compare a 1080Ti and 1080 PCB though, the 1080Ti uses a lot more power. So the reference 1080Ti is already superior in that regard. But if you had two identical GPUs on different PCBs, but the same cooler they would likely perform within testing margins, unless one or the other was a vastly superior GPU, or the memory set happened to overclock well.

My GTX1080 runs at 2100Mhz, up from the stock 2012Mhz with the memory clocked at 10,400Mhz or thereabouts. It has a full coverage water block on it, and is a reference board from EVGA. Maximum temperature I have seen after I have saturated my 280mm radiators is 55C. And I am not that aggressive with the fans. Typical air cooled cards will still hover in the high 70s and low 80s (83C being the default throttle point of most cards). The better non-reference cards are usually binned GPUs, and they can just about match the water cooled ones. You take a non-reference PCB and water cool that and you maintain that binning difference, so you will see the occasionally 2200Mhz GPU.

GTX1080 can average about 90FPS in high end gaming titles at 2560x1440, high/max settings. The 1080Ti can pull off about 30% more, so regardless of cooling it is the better choice for that resolution. Neither can really max out the monitor under all conditions.
 

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