[SOLVED] 10g - 2.5g MultiGig Requirement & Routing

preynolds2

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Feb 17, 2014
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Trying to get wired up correctly.

I have a mess of Cat 7a cable.. (it was free)
A motherboard with a 10gb and a 2.5gb port..
A switch that supports 2.5gbe...
A Nas with double 2.5gbe connections..
A router with a 2.5g port.
I have 1 Gig fiber internet coming into my house.

Cat 7a from outside to my router.

I use the 2.5gbe port on my router to go from the router to my 2.5gbe switch
From the 2.5gbe switch to my Nas.
Also from the Switch to my Main TV.
Will this give me a nice 2.5gb connection to my TV for 4k Streaming?
Or does my TV need something else special?

What is the use of the 10g and 2.5g ports on my motherboard?
Being that I only have 1gb internet.
I assume I could set one for Lan and skip the router?


Thanks for answering my stupid questions!
 
So unless you actually know why you "need" faster than 1gbit ports/networks you likely will not see any advantage setting it up.

You would know the application that was going to use it.

As you stated your internet is limited to 1gbit so that will be your maximum download rate. The tv also only has 1gbit ports but even if it has a 10g port it does not need it. The tv only function is to take a video stream and put it on the screen. Depending on where you get the video data from. Things like netflix are in the 25mbps range. I think playing blueray over your network is something like 150mbps. There might be some other data formats but your tv must support it. I doubt a tv will even get close to 1gbit data rate.

Maybe a backup from your pc to the NAS would run faster. The limiting factor is going to be the disk systems both in the NAS and in your PC. If you were to use some single drive solutions rather than raid the disk itself can limiting you to well under 1gbit.

So you need to reverse the way you look at things. You need to find a application that you need more than 1gbit of bandwidth and then look for the solution rather than trying to find a use for technology.

Cat7a is a very strange cable standard and like normal cat7 it is not fully recognized by the certification boards. I am not sure why this came out they claim 40gbit but it seems to have the same limitation as cat8 which is actually a cable type that will be fully certified. The key things is these cable are designed to only run in data centers.
It makes it even more likely that the cable you purchased is fake. It will likely run at full gigbit and maybe even 10gbit but I doubt it really meets the requirements for cat7a. These cables are a huge pain to deal with. They are very thick and stiff compared to normal ethernet cable because of all the internal shielding.

So if you find a use for your faster port I would buy cat6a cable that is certified to run at 10g. Normal cat6 will work a shorter distance but the cost between cat6 and cat6a is not as much anymore.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
More information needed.

Connectivity being (line diagram where ----> is an Ethernet wire).

ISP === Fiber ===> ONT ---->Modem ---->[WAN Port] Router [LAN port] ----> Switch[LAN Ports] -----> to NAS, Main TV, +other wired devices.

and ~~~ wireless ~~~> wireless devices if any.

Edit and correct my line diagram as necessary.

The first problem may be with those Cat7a cables. Source, quality, speed? Cable may really not be up to actually providing even 1 GB performance. Lots of fake, counterfeit, and generally junk cables being sold nowadays.

A good quality Cat5e, pure copper (no CCA) 22-24 AWG should be fine.

You cannot skip the router unless the modem is actually a Modem/Router.

Make and model information for Modem or Modem/Router, Switch? Make and model TV?
 
So unless you actually know why you "need" faster than 1gbit ports/networks you likely will not see any advantage setting it up.

You would know the application that was going to use it.

As you stated your internet is limited to 1gbit so that will be your maximum download rate. The tv also only has 1gbit ports but even if it has a 10g port it does not need it. The tv only function is to take a video stream and put it on the screen. Depending on where you get the video data from. Things like netflix are in the 25mbps range. I think playing blueray over your network is something like 150mbps. There might be some other data formats but your tv must support it. I doubt a tv will even get close to 1gbit data rate.

Maybe a backup from your pc to the NAS would run faster. The limiting factor is going to be the disk systems both in the NAS and in your PC. If you were to use some single drive solutions rather than raid the disk itself can limiting you to well under 1gbit.

So you need to reverse the way you look at things. You need to find a application that you need more than 1gbit of bandwidth and then look for the solution rather than trying to find a use for technology.

Cat7a is a very strange cable standard and like normal cat7 it is not fully recognized by the certification boards. I am not sure why this came out they claim 40gbit but it seems to have the same limitation as cat8 which is actually a cable type that will be fully certified. The key things is these cable are designed to only run in data centers.
It makes it even more likely that the cable you purchased is fake. It will likely run at full gigbit and maybe even 10gbit but I doubt it really meets the requirements for cat7a. These cables are a huge pain to deal with. They are very thick and stiff compared to normal ethernet cable because of all the internal shielding.

So if you find a use for your faster port I would buy cat6a cable that is certified to run at 10g. Normal cat6 will work a shorter distance but the cost between cat6 and cat6a is not as much anymore.
 

preynolds2

Distinguished
Feb 17, 2014
9
0
18,510
0
More information needed.

Connectivity being (line diagram where ----> is an Ethernet wire).

ISP === Fiber ===> ONT ---->Modem ---->[WAN Port] Router [LAN port] ----> Switch[LAN Ports] -----> to NAS, Main TV, +other wired devices.

and ~~~ wireless ~~~> wireless devices if any.

Edit and correct my line diagram as necessary.

The first problem may be with those Cat7a cables. Source, quality, speed? Cable may really not be up to actually providing even 1 GB performance. Lots of fake, counterfeit, and generally junk cables being sold nowadays.

A good quality Cat5e, pure copper (no CCA) 22-24 AWG should be fine.

You cannot skip the router unless the modem is actually a Modem/Router.

Make and model information for Modem or Modem/Router, Switch? Make and model TV?


Thanks for the Replies ;)

Cable - Cat7A Shielded CMR (Riser) - 10Gb, 23AWG, 1000MHz, S/FTP, Solid, Bulk Networking Cable
Router - NETGEAR Nighthawk 12-Stream WiFi 6E Router (RAXE500)
Switch -QNAP QSW-1105-5T 5-Port Unmanaged 2.5GbE Switch Broadcom BCM53161
TV - LG C1 48 inch Class 4K Smart OLED

I realize that my regular internet will only be 1gig

I already have the cable and the TV.

I plan to purchase a NAS for backup and to use as something to store my movies to stream to my TV.
Something like this maybe (Asustor AS5202T - 2 Bay NAS, 2.0GHz Dual-Core, 2 2.5GbE Ports, 2GB RAM DDR4 )

I was just trying to put something else together like the switch so I could get better speed/transfers from my NAS to the TV. So I could get 4k without any bottlenecks.
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
I use the 2.5gbe port on my router to go from the router to my 2.5gbe switch
From the 2.5gbe switch to my Nas.
Also from the Switch to my Main TV.
Will this give me a nice 2.5gb connection to my TV for 4k Streaming?
Or does my TV need something else special?
Most TVs with wired ethernet are 100Mbit. They don't support gigabit. So your connection to your TV will be limited by the speed the TV supports.
 

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