Question 10th gen CPUs

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eibelbilly

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I'm looking to build a new system my best friend uses a i7 9700f I would like to get similar or better fps for cheap what CPU should I buy,,,

According to userbenchmark the i7 9th gen is only 15 percent faster in game then a 10th gen i3

My current CPU is a fx6300 3.5ghz
Please help
 
Ryzen would be better, it's not as expensive and will give you good FPS. A Ryzen 5 3600, with a B450 motherboard and 16 GB DDR4 RAM at 3600 MHz speed. It'll be a mid-range gaming setup, and depending on the game you'll get similar or slightly lower FPS, but all games will be completely playable as long as the GPU can handle them.

Edit: For a full system recommendation, please list a proper budget, where you live, what stores are available.
 

eibelbilly

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Ryzen would be better, it's not as expensive and will give you good FPS. A Ryzen 5 3600, with a B450 motherboard and 16 GB DDR4 RAM at 3600 MHz speed. It'll be a mid-range gaming setup, and depending on the game you'll get similar or slightly lower FPS, but all games will be completely playable as long as the GPU can handle them.

Edit: For a full system recommendation, please list a proper budget, where you live, what stores are available.
A ryzen 5 CPU uses more ram on average and is double the price with 10 percent less fps than a i3 10th gen
 
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A ryzen 5 CPU uses more ram on average and is double the price with 10 percent less fps than a i3 10th gen
Where are you getting these numbers from? What games do you play? The i3 will only be faster in games if they don't use more than 4 cores, and a lot of multiplayer games and even single player games nowadays use more than 4 cores. If you buy an i3 and play such games, your average FPS will be great but you'll get constant stutters, FPS drops, and it'll overall not be a good experience. And the average RAM usage thing is just wrong.

If you will only play 1 or 2 games with this PC, and you know they don't need more than 4 cores, then sure, go with 10th gen i3. Keep in mind, though, that you need a high refresh rate monitor to see all that extra FPS - a 60 Hz monitor can only display 60 FPS, anything above that 60 FPS is just a waste of GPU power because they'll never get displayed. It will improve input lag, but the difference in most games between Ryzen and Intel is so small that the input lag factor is almost negligible.

Again, it all depends on the games. Average FPS is not everything.
 
That's just what people online say
Whoever said that to you is either trying to fool you or is an idiot themselves, because there's no such thing, and even if there was, it's no way of comparing two processors. In fact, you WANT more RAM to be used because that makes your system faster since the system doesn't have to keep going back to your much slower secondary storage for accessing things, it can find them in RAM much faster.

Anyway, like I said, Ryzen is your best bet, unless you only play very specific games that don't need more than 4 cores.
 
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Cere

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Where are you getting these numbers from? What games do you play? The i3 will only be faster in games if they don't use more than 4 cores, and a lot of multiplayer games and even single player games nowadays use more than 4 cores. If you buy an i3 and play such games, your average FPS will be great but you'll get constant stutters, FPS drops, and it'll overall not be a good experience. And the average RAM usage thing is just wrong.

If you will only play 1 or 2 games with this PC, and you know they don't need more than 4 cores, then sure, go with 10th gen i3. Keep in mind, though, that you need a high refresh rate monitor to see all that extra FPS - a 60 Hz monitor can only display 60 FPS, anything above that 60 FPS is just a waste of GPU power because they'll never get displayed. It will improve input lag, but the difference in most games between Ryzen and Intel is so small that the input lag factor is almost negligible.

Again, it all depends on the games. Average FPS is not everything.
Where do you get games use 4 cores? Games in fact can run off of only 1-2 cores. But the higher cores you have and the more threads each core handle is the determining factor. The Problem with AMD is their gaming performance lacks in all tests. In fact a Ryzen 9-3950x PBO gets 129 FPS, where as an i7-9700K @ 5.1 gets 141 FPS. At base clocks though, Ryzen 9 3900x PBO gets 128 and i7-9700k 127. And I’ve never seen my i7-9700k run at base clock speed. When you open a game the i7 auto boosts itself (no overclocking done) to 5.1. So yea Intel beats the highest AMD processor in gaming. AMD is great for multitasking, Intel for gaming.

now if you’re on a budget get AMD, if not get Intel hands down. Just the 13 FPS in a game is like taking away a click or two here and there.
 
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eibelbilly

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Where do you get games use 4 cores? Games in fact can run off of only 1-2 cores. But the higher cores you have and the more threads each core handle is the determining factor. The Problem with AMD is their gaming performance lacks in all tests. In fact a Ryzen 9-3950x PBO gets 129 FPS, where as an i7-9700K @ 5.1 gets 141 FPS. At base clocks though, Ryzen 9 3900x PBO gets 128 and i7-9700k 127. And I’ve never seen my i7-9700k run at base clock speed. When you open a game the i7 auto boosts itself (no overclocking done) to 5.1. So yea Intel beats the highest AMD processor in gaming. AMD is great for multitasking, Intel for gaming.

now if you’re on a budget get AMD, if not get Intel hands down. Just the 13 FPS in a game is like taking away a click or two here and there.
Should I get a i3 10320 or a i5 10600
 
Where do you get games use 4 cores? Games in fact can run off of only 1-2 cores. But the higher cores you have and the more threads each core handle is the determining factor. The Problem with AMD is their gaming performance lacks in all tests. In fact a Ryzen 9-3950x PBO gets 129 FPS, where as an i7-9700K @ 5.1 gets 141 FPS. At base clocks though, Ryzen 9 3900x PBO gets 128 and i7-9700k 127. And I’ve never seen my i7-9700k run at base clock speed. When you open a game the i7 auto boosts itself (no overclocking done) to 5.1. So yea Intel beats the highest AMD processor in gaming. AMD is great for multitasking, Intel for gaming.

now if you’re on a budget get AMD, if not get Intel hands down. Just the 13 FPS in a game is like taking away a click or two here and there.
Have you ever played Ghost Recon Wildlands on a 4 core CPU? Or Shadow of the Tomb Raider? Or Battlefield V? Assassin's Creed Osyssey? These are just a FEW of the games that run far better on a 6c/12t processor than on a 4 core processor, with or without hyperthreading.

The claim of Intel being better at gaming is indeed true, but if you have ever seen a single unbiased review in your entire life, you'll know that Intel is better in VERY specific scenarios, and with a 120 or even 144 Hz monitor, you'll never tell the difference between an Intel chip and an AMD chip, let alone on a 60 Hz monitor. The fact of the matter is that the numbers you are claiming for showing Intel's superiority are very likely to be extremely biased - consider the very obvious bias that the 3950X is obviously running at its out of the box configuration, while the i7 has been overclocked on a very high-end liquid cooler to reach that 5.1 GHz figure. Along with that obvious difference, there's also the fact that the 3950X is a 16 core 32 thread processor while the i7 is a measly 8 core 8 thread. If you think comparing these two chips (with one being a $750 chip and the other being a $400 chip) is a fair comparison, you need help. The 3950X is obviously not aimed at gamers anyway.

My point being, any reasonable person knows that Intel being better at gaming is now only a thing that people say, but no one actually believes Intel is better for pretty much anything, except if you want to play less demanding eSports games with a 240 Hz monitor and an overkill GPU.

And also, an i3 is absolutely not a workstation CPU - it's the exact opposite. Do you even know what a workstation means? It doesn't mean a PC on which you do office stuff - a workstation PC is supposed to have high-end hardware for demanding things like video editing, animation, etc. An i3 is an entry-level gaming or office PC CPU, not a workstation CPU.
 
All I want is a CPU that will get good fps on high settings under 160
Ryzen 5 3600 is $167 on newegg, at 120 Hz you don't want to buy anything else unless you want to spend extra on cooler and motherboard. If you buy an i5 10600K you'll need a separate aftermarket cooler and if you want to overclock you'll need an expensive motherboard(cheapest compatible motherboard with overclocking costs $150), if you get the Ryzen 5 3600 you can get a B450 MAX motherboard with all the features you need for $115, and no need for a cooler, stock is enough.
 

Cere

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Have you ever played Ghost Recon Wildlands on a 4 core CPU? Or Shadow of the Tomb Raider? Or Battlefield V? Assassin's Creed Osyssey? These are just a FEW of the games that run far better on a 6c/12t processor than on a 4 core processor, with or without hyperthreading.

The claim of Intel being better at gaming is indeed true, but if you have ever seen a single unbiased review in your entire life, you'll know that Intel is better in VERY specific scenarios, and with a 120 or even 144 Hz monitor, you'll never tell the difference between an Intel chip and an AMD chip, let alone on a 60 Hz monitor. The fact of the matter is that the numbers you are claiming for showing Intel's superiority are very likely to be extremely biased - consider the very obvious bias that the 3950X is obviously running at its out of the box configuration, while the i7 has been overclocked on a very high-end liquid cooler to reach that 5.1 GHz figure. Along with that obvious difference, there's also the fact that the 3950X is a 16 core 32 thread processor while the i7 is a measly 8 core 8 thread. If you think comparing these two chips (with one being a $750 chip and the other being a $400 chip) is a fair comparison, you need help. The 3950X is obviously not aimed at gamers anyway.

My point being, any reasonable person knows that Intel being better at gaming is now only a thing that people say, but no one actually believes Intel is better for pretty much anything, except if you want to play less demanding eSports games with a 240 Hz monitor and an overkill GPU.

And also, an i3 is absolutely not a workstation CPU - it's the exact opposite. Do you even know what a workstation means? It doesn't mean a PC on which you do office stuff - a workstation PC is supposed to have high-end hardware for demanding things like video editing, animation, etc. An i3 is an entry-level gaming or office PC CPU, not a workstation CPU.
You’re confusing cores with threads. The more threads the smoother and better gameplay.
 
You’re confusing cores with threads. The more threads the smoother and better gameplay.
At this point I feel like you're a troll. Cores and threads are almost the same thing - a 4 core CPU can have 4 or 8 threads, 6 core can have 6 or 12 threads. There's no confusion. A 10th gen i3 is 4 cores, 8 threads. A Ryzen 5 3600 is 6 cores 12 threads. The higher number of cores often correspond to higher number of threads, but not always(like an i7 9700F is 8 core 8 threads, but the R5 3600 is 6 cores 12 threads - fewer cores but more threads). A 10th gen i3 is worse than a Ryzen 5 3600 in both core count and thread count.

A 10th gen i5 has the same cores and threads as an R5 3600, but is more expensive if overclocking is required, and if you buy the non-overclockable version, it's still more expensive than an R5 3600, along with the stock cooler being trash on the i5. Which again supports my point that you don't want to buy Intel if you are "a smart and informed consumer".
 
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Cere

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At this point I feel like you're a troll. Cores and threads are almost the same thing - a 4 core CPU can have 4 or 8 threads, 6 core can have 6 or 12 threads. There's no confusion. A 10th gen i3 is 4 cores, 8 threads. A Ryzen 5 3600 is 6 cores 12 threads. The higher number of cores often correspond to higher number of threads, but not always(like an i7 9700F is 8 core 8 threads, but the R5 3600 is 6 cores 12 threads - fewer cores but more threads). A 10th gen i3 is worse than a Ryzen 5 3600 in both core count and thread count.

A 10th gen i5 has the same cores and threads as an R5 3600, but is more expensive if overclocking is required, and if you buy the non-overclockable version, it's still more expensive than an R5 3600, along with the stock cooler being trash on the i5. Which again supports my point that you don't want to buy Intel if you are "a smart and informed consumer".
Dude, cores and threads are far from same thing. Each core has a number of threads it can handle at any time. You could have 2 cores and 12 threads on each core, giving you 24 threads total. Each thread can process information by itself. The core is the unit as a whole, the threads are the make up of each core.
 
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