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Deicidium369

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What is your source for the Ongoing yield issues with 10nm? The issues a few years back? You know, things change, and pretty sure Intel has the issues ironed out. They dropped the Cascade Lake from 1 & 2S socket servers (and will be avail on 4 & 8S) because the 10nm yield issues are more than likely ironed out.

I know it's hard to deal with facts when you are an AMD Shill (as is Tom's Hardware in general) and I think deep down you know that this is the end of the Netburst era being replayed here and the time in the sun for AMD - just as it was previously... maybe another 12 years without another successful launch...

What's really funny is with all these poor yields and failed this and botched that that AMD cannot capitalize on those issues... AMD can add all the superfluous cores they want - they should have taken some of that die space and added at least rudimentary graphics so they would be competitive in the business class OEM machines - rather than having to add another part to the BoM and another part for IT and Support to have to deal with...

So, if you are going to make baseless and uninformed comments about "ongoing yield issues" provide a source, and not just the echo chamber here at Tom's.
 

InvalidError

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What is your source for the Ongoing yield issues with 10nm? The issues a few years back? You know, things change, and pretty sure Intel has the issues ironed out.
Intel confirmed in its last investor report that 10nm is never going to match 14nm's productivity. That's why Intel has given up on scaling 10nm capacity beyond what it needs to meet its existing commitments and is even looking at back-porting 10nm designs to 14nm.
 

Deicidium369

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What that meant was the 10nm process will be shorter lived than either the 22 or the 14nm process. Rocket Lake (willow cores 14nm) was ALWAYS in the plans. Detaching the IP from the manufacturing process is a good idea, does not deal with any yield issues.

14nm would be hard to match - based on sales of anything Intel built with that process - even the 22nm would not even be in the same league.

So don't take what was a comment about the lifetime productivity of 10nm (again, will be a relatively short node) as any comment whatsoever about yields. So yes, the total number of devices manufactured on 10nm will never reach the same numbers as those manufactured on 14nm.
 

spongiemaster

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Intel confirmed in its last investor report that 10nm is never going to match 14nm's productivity. That's why Intel has given up on scaling 10nm capacity beyond what it needs to meet its existing commitments and is even looking at back-porting 10nm designs to 14nm.
The definition of productive is certainly up for debate here. I don't think he was talking about performance of 10nm, but of profitability. He said 10nm would be less productive than 22nm. Clearly, he can't be referring to performance if that's a factual statement. All he was implying from this productive statement was that 10nm would be short lived and quickly replaced with 7nm, thus not making them much money. I don't think any node is ever going to be as productive as 14nm has been for Intel considering how long it has dragged out.
 
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truerock

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Intel: 10nm Yield Is Ahead Of Expectation, 7nm Ponte Vecchio GPU On Track
By Usman Pirzada
Jan 24, 2020

Intel has had a fantastic quarter and the company is literally selling every chip it can make. Turns out there were a few additional nuggets of information buried in the slides as well. Intel has officially stated that their 10nm yields are ahead of expectations and that they are planning at least nine 10nm products for release in 2020. The 7nm lead product, Intel Xe Ponte Vecchio GPU remains on-track for Q4'21.
Intel planning nine 10nm products in 2020, yields ahead of expectations

Intel is incredibly skilled at improving architecture while staying on the same node, but considering 14nm has been around for a very long time, the shift to 10nm is eagerly anticipated and will likely be a turning point in the company's history. While there were some rumors earlier on (that Intel readily debunked) it is not clear that 10nm HVM is expected to make landfall in 2020. Intel has further revealed that not only are yields above expectation but they will be rolling out a total of nine 10nm products in 2020.

Here are the key takeaways:

10nm yields are ahead of expectation.
Nine 10nm products are expected to release in 2020.
Intel will increase its wafer capacity by 25% in 2020.
7nm Ponte Vecchio GPU on track for Q4 2021.
 

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