News 16 Shades of Gray: 25-inch E Ink Monitor Could Ease Eyestrain

Jul 1, 2020
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For most (!) people it's all about background lighting anyway. If luminosity (and preferably colour) of the wall behind your display matches the screen you should be fine. The advantage of e-ink is mostly practical: it doesn't stand out too much against the background. Of course, it's also about resolution, weight, uniformity, power consumption and general feeling but the eye strain in most cases comes from that difference between screen and background.
 

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For most (!) people it's all about background lighting anyway. If luminosity (and preferably colour) of the wall behind your display matches the screen you should be fine. The advantage of e-ink is mostly practical: it doesn't stand out too much against the background. Of course, it's also about resolution, weight, uniformity, power consumption and general feeling but the eye strain in most cases comes from that difference between screen and background.
I completely agree with this. For me I have found that in most setups it helps to turn the screen brightness all the way down, close to minimum.
 
Jul 1, 2020
11
4
15
0
I completely agree with this. For me I have found that in most setups it helps to turn the screen brightness all the way down, close to minimum.
Well, as long as the wall behind the screen is lit adequately, I prefer moderately high level of brightness. This contrast is all that really matters. For example, a book read in a shadow in a sunny day is very, very bright and I don't think anyone would say that reading in such conditions causes eye-strain.
 
For most (!) people it's all about background lighting anyway. If luminosity (and preferably colour) of the wall behind your display matches the screen you should be fine. The advantage of e-ink is mostly practical: it doesn't stand out too much against the background. Of course, it's also about resolution, weight, uniformity, power consumption and general feeling but the eye strain in most cases comes from that difference between screen and background.
Yeah, placing a light source like a lamp behind one's monitor, with its light projecting onto the wall, is likely to help a lot with eyestrain. And in a dimly-lit room, light projected onto the wall and ceiling behind a monitor can produce a nice diffuse lighting for the room without harsh shadows, and screen reflections tend to be minimized when their are no light sources behind the viewer.

As for the other potential advantages of e-ink, they don't really provide much benefit in a desktop environment. Resolution-wise, at 3200x1800 we're only talking about a resolution roughly in-between 1440p and 4K. A 4K panel will not only offer 44% higher resolution, but that also works to higher pixel density on anything up to a 30" screen. And considering such screens can be found starting at around $300 or so, that makes spending thousands for an e-ink panel a bit of a tough sell. Especially if one intends to use such a screen for anything other than strictly text-viewing, as it's only grayscale, and just 16 levels of gray at that. Plus, the response-times of e-ink are quite poor, with significant ghosting on these panels, and a refresh rate that's probably not much higher than 10-15Hz judging by their video. Any power or weight advantages also won't be all that useful on the desktop. E-Ink could be an interesting alternative to other display technologies for monitors, but without significantly better pricing, it's going to be extremely niche.
 
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