[SOLVED] 2 routers share name and signal

Dec 27, 2021
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Need help with home network. Have a xfinity xb6 wifi router on one end of home and a netgear wifi router on the other end of home connected by ethernet. One broadcasts Network 1, and the other broadcasts Network 2. How do I make them share a signal/network? 1 is 192.168.0.1 while 2 10.0.0.1?
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
You will need reconfigure/change the Netgear router to be an AP using a static IP address; for example: 10.0.0.2 (if not already being used) per the first link provided in Post #2 above.

Reserve that 10.0.0.2 IP address on the Xfinity router using the Netgear router's MAC.

Connectivity (----> being an Ethernet cable):

Xfinity router [LAN port]----> Power Line Adapter ---to basement--->Power Line Adapter ----> [LAN port]Netgear router with DHCP disabled.

Netgear router/AP then serves wired network devices via its' remaining LAN ports as well as antennas for wireless network devices.

Correct and edit my diagram as necessary.

You do not need to use the router admin sites. Open a network browser and type in the IP address for the router you wish to access.

For the Xfinity router use 10.0.0.1 - you will still be prompted for login name and password.


Once set up, the Xfinity router manages all DHCP IP addresses to all connecting DHCP devices - wired and wireless. The Netgear is disabled and will not and should not provide IP address to other network devices.

Network devices will all need to be configured to obtain a DHCP IP address (10.0.0.x) from the Xfinity router (10.0.0.1, subnet 255.255.255.0) within the allowed DHCP IP address range.

That range could be 10.0.0.10 to 10.0.0.20 or higher depending on the number of of network devices expected.

Planning is important and I recommend that you sketch out a simple diagram of what you have in mind. The requirements.....

Overall once set up all devices will be on the same network independent of connectivity (wired or wireless). However, "roaming" may be and can be problematic thereafter.

However the first objective is to get everything up and running on one network.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
If I understand correctly the objective is to just have a single network - is that correct?

What you will need to do is to set up the netgear wifi router as an Access Point.

Start here:

https://kb.netgear.com/20927/How-do-I-change-my-NETGEAR-router-to-AP-mode

You will find it helpful to have the User Manuals for the Xfinity router and the Netgear router available.

Read both manuals and plan out the configuration beforehand.

Also - recommended reading:

https://www.lifewire.com/building-a-wireless-home-network-816562

Is the xfinity network actually #2 (10.0.0.1)?

Reference:

https://howchoo.com/g/mwiyywixmgz/how-to-log-in-to-a-comcast-xfinity-router
 
Dec 27, 2021
4
0
10
0
If I understand correctly the objective is to just have a single network - is that correct?

What you will need to do is to set up the netgear wifi router as an Access Point.

Start here:

https://kb.netgear.com/20927/How-do-I-change-my-NETGEAR-router-to-AP-mode

You will find it helpful to have the User Manuals for the Xfinity router and the Netgear router available.

Read both manuals and plan out the configuration beforehand.

Also - recommended reading:

https://www.lifewire.com/building-a-wireless-home-network-816562

Is the xfinity network actually #2 (10.0.0.1)?

Reference:

https://howchoo.com/g/mwiyywixmgz/how-to-log-in-to-a-comcast-xfinity-router
no the main router is xfinity xb6 its 10.0.0.1 then i have eethernet powerline adapter to basement and netgear plugged in (192.168.0.1) I want them to both broadcast essentially the same network so wherever you go in the house you dont need to connect to 2 different networks, is that possible, essentially have them working togeather? Its very confusing trying to work with the router admin sites... and now for some reason when im using wifi I cant access certain sites it says this site can not be reached. im losing my mind
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
You will need reconfigure/change the Netgear router to be an AP using a static IP address; for example: 10.0.0.2 (if not already being used) per the first link provided in Post #2 above.

Reserve that 10.0.0.2 IP address on the Xfinity router using the Netgear router's MAC.

Connectivity (----> being an Ethernet cable):

Xfinity router [LAN port]----> Power Line Adapter ---to basement--->Power Line Adapter ----> [LAN port]Netgear router with DHCP disabled.

Netgear router/AP then serves wired network devices via its' remaining LAN ports as well as antennas for wireless network devices.

Correct and edit my diagram as necessary.

You do not need to use the router admin sites. Open a network browser and type in the IP address for the router you wish to access.

For the Xfinity router use 10.0.0.1 - you will still be prompted for login name and password.


Once set up, the Xfinity router manages all DHCP IP addresses to all connecting DHCP devices - wired and wireless. The Netgear is disabled and will not and should not provide IP address to other network devices.

Network devices will all need to be configured to obtain a DHCP IP address (10.0.0.x) from the Xfinity router (10.0.0.1, subnet 255.255.255.0) within the allowed DHCP IP address range.

That range could be 10.0.0.10 to 10.0.0.20 or higher depending on the number of of network devices expected.

Planning is important and I recommend that you sketch out a simple diagram of what you have in mind. The requirements.....

Overall once set up all devices will be on the same network independent of connectivity (wired or wireless). However, "roaming" may be and can be problematic thereafter.

However the first objective is to get everything up and running on one network.
 
Dec 27, 2021
4
0
10
0
I have an Xfinity xb6 wireless modem that does not reach my entire home. Then I also have a Netgear n600 broadcasting wifi on the other end of my home(they are connected by 100ft Ethernet) . How can I have them both broadcasting the same signal, theoretically when walking around the home your device would just auto connect to whichever wifi router is putting out a stronger signal without having to disconnect from the weaker signal. I can access Xfinity admin through 10.0.0.1 but for some reason can no longer access the Netgear admin site (usually 192.168.... or router login. Net or . Com and etc) I have looked up the IP of the router and still that will not get me to the netgear admin page.

Main wifi an Xfinity xb6 wireless modem that does not reach entire home. Opposite side have a Netgear n600 broadcasting wifi (they are connected by 100ft Ethernet) . How can both broadcast the same signal (both share network name and password). And theoretically when walking around the home device would just auto connect to whichever wifi router is putting out a stronger signal without having to disconnect from the weaker signal. Can access Xfinity admin through 10.0.0.1 but can no longer access the Netgear admin site (usually 192.168.... or router login. Net or . Com and etc). Netgear router IP will not lead to netgear admin page.


For example in Xfinity admin page do I want bridge mode on? Do I want moc on? There are so many confusing options I'm losing my mind. Is a Netgear n600 even capable of what I am trying to do?
 

Phillipson

Honorable
Jun 14, 2016
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10,545
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Here's my opinion:

Why bother? It seems you are jumping through hoops to accomplish a "mesh network"
- Review 'repeaters' online

If your goal is to have multiple "APs" thus increased signal through out the home, simply look-up 'Repeaters". It doesn't make sense to have two separate devices that serve the same purpose attempting to share broadcast signals. My recommendation is to invest in a Repeater. It will amplify one router's signal in a complete different area of the home. Best of luck, friend.
 
Dec 27, 2021
4
0
10
0
Here's my opinion:

Why bother? It seems you are jumping through hoops to accomplish a "mesh network"
- Review 'repeaters' online

If your goal is to have multiple "APs" thus increased signal through out the home, simply look-up 'Repeaters". It doesn't make sense to have two separate devices that serve the same purpose attempting to share broadcast signals. My recommendation is to invest in a Repeater. It will amplify one router's signal in a complete different area of the home. Best of luck, friend.
Ok just to clarify a repeater isn't like a wifi booster correct? because I know boosters just take in the weak signal it can access (based on how far from router it is) then resends the weak signal instead of sending a new strong signal like my second router.

To be honest I kind of feel like an idiot because my internet is reaching my second router through a power line adapter, and I'm now guessing I could have bought a power line adapter with a repeater built in or something lol
 
You never want to use a repeater unless you have no other options. The key problem with a repeater is it uses wifi to connect back to the main router. You now have 2 wifi signals in the path that you have to worry about interference on and you will cut your bandwidth by at least half. Now if you were to connect a repeater with a ethernet cable then and turn of the repeater function you now just have a AP.

Using a old router as a AP like you tried is the cheapest way to do this. You just configured it incorrectly. Some devices have a AP mode so you can then use the WAN port. If not you connect to a LAN port and disable the DHCP function on the second router. You also need to assign a IP to the LAN on the second router to something that does not conflict with your main router but is in the same subnet. Technically you should check the DHCP pool on the first router and choose one outside the dhcp range. What will likely work is to change the second router to 10.0.0.250.

So after reading this more it appear this advise was already given by ralston18.

At this point your network is a single network. You should be able to log into to both the router and the AP from anywhere as well as use the internet.

Your problem is you want automatic roaming. Wifi was never really designed to do that. It is not like a cell phone system where the network/tower is in control. With wifi the end device is in full control. It actually has no way to really know there is a "better" signal because it only has 1 radio and to scan it would need to drop the session.
What it does wait until the signal gets to some level which is pretty low before it will check. You can change this but then you run the risk of it constantly bouncing between signals.

No matter what the mesh equipment guys try to claim there is no such thing as seamless roaming.

Now it actually mostly works if you setup your devices correctly. You want the signal to overlap as little as possible but still provide good coverage. You need to turn down the radio power in many case. It is all trial and error.
The end device now will really have only 1 "best" signal to choose and the other signal should be weak enough to force it change. Since most people do not actually try to use their device while they are in the process of walking between rooms it will switch fairly well.
If you are one of those people who think they need to watch netflix while they walk down the stairs in their house then maybe its good it doesn't "seamless" roam.

Now you can just stick AP in and not worry about the power or anything. You the human will know much better than the device if a better signal is available. You just stop and start the wifi and it will switch to the strongest signal. Now some people go even farther and use different SSID on the devices. This way they can
balance and control which devices connect to which AP. It is still one network just has different names. It all depends on what is most important to you.
 

Phillipson

Honorable
Jun 14, 2016
36
3
10,545
2
You never want to use a repeater unless you have no other options. The key problem with a repeater is it uses wifi to connect back to the main router. You now have 2 wifi signals in the path that you have to worry about interference on and you will cut your bandwidth by at least half. Now if you were to connect a repeater with a ethernet cable then and turn of the repeater function you now just have a AP.
I completely second this, there couldn't be a better response. I just want to add: everything said here may sound confusing. But it's honestly not. Move towards the solution step by step and eventually your issue will be resolved and better yet - you will learn a great deal!

My recommendation: Don't give up, keep working this problem until it's resolved
  • Google is an ally, review online documentation for your Router
  • Understand the concept of what you're doing
If you must use a Repeater, just make sure it's hardwired and it's not a cheap one. It's easier but what's the fun in that

Cheers, friend
 

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