[SOLVED] 2014 PC - what to upgrade for gaming and Lightroom?

natcha12

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A ryzen would be better than an i7 and more future proof just simply because of the PCIe4. Intel just does NOT have any board that uses it, yet.
Plus for AMD.

The competing top of the range current boards are AMD X570 and Intel Z490. Think of the number of PCIe lanes of a board as a kind of currency. You want a very fast SSD slot? That costs 4x PCIe gen 3 or 2x Gen 4 (because 4 is twice the speed), things add up fast with all the additional features. In the end, you will either be buying a Intel board with up to 24, or a AMD with up to a comparable 32 (16 PCIe4 x 2).
These boards are pretty much equally priced, so thats a plus for AMD.

You are misunderstanding the RAM. Capacity and speed are seperate. 32 is all well and good but the Gigahertz is what you should look at. I suggested 2x 16gb sticks at 3600Ghz instead of the bog standard 2400Ghz because that is where you hit the premium paywall for anything faster, reduced gains for more money dropped on them.

GPU; If anybody asks me for a build idea without a timescale, i assume it means right then and there, so I offer then and there parts. If you say you could hold off then you should till Ampere, whether you are getting that or last gen, for sure.

In 3 years you'll be able to look at your Ryzen build and could add 2 more ram slots to get 64g, could possibly get the next/latest compatible CPU upgrade for your board, could get the best GPU on the market and enjoy that sweet up to 128GB bandwidth (a current 2080Ti uses well under half of that). Get a 10Gig ethernet port add-in. Shove in the 3d printing, laser powered PCIe card that connects directly with your brain they make a few years from now :ROFLMAO:

Here you go. Might seem weird paying more for the board than the processor, but thats what happens when you have a monopoly on a new technology.
CPU/RAM/board for $600:
PCPartPicker Part List
 
Wow - so everything will be a bottleneck?

Will my case, power supply, and HDs be ok to reuse?
Well, I mean that there's no new or much better CPU for that MB, RAM doesn't work with new MBs either. so that leaves only a bit better GPU or processor would be bad bottleneck.
Psu would have to be chosen according to rest of parts, particularly to be matched to GPU although keeping old PSU for new system is not advisable.
Other stuff you could keep, case and disks for instance.
 

pulpfiction110

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Well, I mean that there's no new or much better CPU for that MB, RAM doesn't work with new MBs either. so that leaves only a bit better GPU or processor would be bad bottleneck.
Psu would have to be chosen according to rest of parts, particularly to be matched to GPU although keeping old PSU for new system is not advisable.
Other stuff you could keep, case and disks for instance.
Gotcha. So MB, CPU, GPU, RAM, and PSU...perhaps more storage...is what I'll get.

In regards to the following, what's your advice for decent future proofing - basically want to make sure I can run games in max or close to max settings and minimize lag for Lightroom work? I am not really a hardcore gamer, but will definitely be playing games like Diablo 4 (which probably won't be too intensive) and maybe games like the new Doom. Maybe VR readiness is a good thing as well.
    • MB - Don't even know where to start. What's your advice?
    • CPU - i5 or i7? Which one would be best bang for my buck?
    • GPU - An rtx 2060 8gb? Overkill?
    • RAM - Thinking I'll need 32gb for smooth Lightroom work. Any particular type to look at?
    • PSU - Any type I should be considering?
    • SSD - Which best bang for my buck SSD to put my operating system on?
    • HD - What should I be looking for?
In regards to budget, not sure, but would probably like to keep it under $1k.

Guess I'll have to find a good guide on how to build again cause I don't remember what to do.
 
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natcha12

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That build has a haswell cpu, 4 generations old i believe ~

Here is what I've come up with
PCPartPicker Part List

Type|Item|Price
:----|:----|:----
CPU | AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor | $167.00 @ Newegg
Motherboard | MSI B450 GAMING PRO CARBON MAX WIFI ATX AM4 Motherboard | $159.99 @ B&H
Memory | G.Skill Ripjaws V 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 CL19 Memory | $129.99 @ Newegg
Storage | Intel 660p Series 1.02 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive | $119.99 @ B&H
Video Card | Gigabyte GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB OC Rev 2.0 Video Card | $319.99 @ Best Buy
Power Supply | Corsair RM (2019) 850 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply | $199.99 @ Amazon
| Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts |
| Total | $1096.95
| Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-06-04 13:42 EDT-0400 |

Getting something along these lines, you start off with overclocked 3600Ghz 16GB memory with room for 2 more if you use heavy editing software, a 12t/6c ryzen, intel NVME, room for a m.2 wifi chip without using a PCIe slot, and also room for ANOTHER gpu later on as well as the included 2060.

All coming in at just under 1100, add 100 for a bigger RAM kit if you are set on 32gb, and another 100 for a storage hdd if needed.
Has a 850w PSU that should be able to handle 2 GPU like the 2060 too

Case/CPU cooler is all down to your taste, as long as its ATX size compatible

Edit: I just remembered, you cannot SLI with a 2060, but if you could upgrade to a 2070 or higher you would gain that option
 

pulpfiction110

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That build has a haswell cpu, 4 generations old i believe ~

Here is what I've come up with
PCPartPicker Part List

Type|Item|Price
:----|:----|:----
CPU | AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor | $167.00 @ Newegg
Motherboard | MSI B450 GAMING PRO CARBON MAX WIFI ATX AM4 Motherboard | $159.99 @ B&H
Memory | G.Skill Ripjaws V 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 CL19 Memory | $129.99 @ Newegg
Storage | Intel 660p Series 1.02 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive | $119.99 @ B&H
Video Card | Gigabyte GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB OC Rev 2.0 Video Card | $319.99 @ Best Buy
Power Supply | Corsair RM (2019) 850 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply | $199.99 @ Amazon
| Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts |
| Total | $1096.95
| Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-06-04 13:42 EDT-0400 |

Getting something along these lines, you start off with overclocked 3600Ghz 16GB memory with room for 2 more if you use heavy editing software, a 12t/6c ryzen, intel NVME, room for a m.2 wifi chip without using a PCIe slot, and also room for ANOTHER gpu later on as well as the included 2060.

All coming in at just under 1100, add 100 for a bigger RAM kit if you are set on 32gb, and another 100 for a storage hdd if needed.
Has a 850w PSU that should be able to handle 2 GPU like the 2060 too

Case/CPU cooler is all down to your taste, as long as its ATX size compatible

Edit: I just remembered, you cannot SLI with a 2060, but if you could upgrade to a 2070 or higher you would gain that option
Thank you!

Question:
  • Would it be better to pay a little extra for an intel? If so which one and what MB?
  • 6GB vs 8GB 2060? Any other cards I should consider?
  • If I probably won't be using 2 GPUs, is 850W overkill and uses more power than necessary? If so, what else could I use?
  • Will I be able to use my original case? Anything else I could use from my current setup besides storage?
BIG QUESTION: If I don't want to take the risk on messing something up building myself, should I just get something prebuilt on ebay?
Edit - Example: https://www.ebay.com/itm/Custom-Gaming-Computer-Ryzen-7-2700-4-1-GHZ-Gaming-PC-32GB-DDR4-Nvidia-RTX-2060/333599142998?_trkparms=ispr=1&hash=item4dac0ef456:g:pmgAAOSwmWdery59&enc=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&checksum=33359914299884d4cf9cc0994c9e9ba99e3becf85111
 
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natcha12

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Reviewing your first post, I suppose you could reuse your PSU and save a bunch. It is only bronze which is below what I'd use, but ok. The difference between bronze and gold efficiency is only 5%, but do remember thats 5% of your used watts being wasted; using 200w gaming for an hour? That's 10 down the drain more than gold.

Your hdd/ssd you could use for storage/os and save even more. 250gb is still enough for a windows install and essential speedy programs. Editing files with a fast PC on a slow HDD on the other hand could bottleneck. I don't know exactly how resource hungry lightroom is, but ssd can shave time off almost anything, how much will depend on what you are specifically doing.

Your case, maybe cooler with a adapter bracket, would fit the new mobo, its the same size as your current. (As long as the case is called ATX, midi case, full tower it'll fit all 3 sizes of consumer boards)

It really does depend how much time you'll spend gaming vs working/editing. with Ryzens gains over AMD's older cpu, and Intel not bringing anything much better in the last couple gen, you could simplify the choice down to between intel edging out ahead for gaming, and Ryzen the same for editing, based on the core count and such being equal.
With gaming generally being more GPU based, I would assume that any multiuse PC for working and gaming, as long as it has a good GPU, would probably be better off ryzen.

But, if you are set on intel then this
PCPartPicker Part List

Type|Item|Price
:----|:----|:----
CPU | Intel Core i7-9700 3 GHz 8-Core Processor | $339.99 @ B&H
Motherboard | Asus PRIME Z390-A ATX LGA1151 Motherboard | $179.99 @ Best Buy
Memory | G.Skill Ripjaws V 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 CL19 Memory | $129.99 @ Newegg
Video Card | Gigabyte GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB OC Rev 2.0 Video Card | $319.99 @ Best Buy
| Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts |
| Total | $969.96
| Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-06-04 16:44 EDT-0400 |

More cores but no hyperthreading (intel 8c vs previous Ryzen 6c/12t) and taking off the PSU/SSD. The slight upgrade over the other build is a mobo with 2 m.2 slots, although none specifically for wifi.

You may be able to save even more by going with a 2nd hand gtx 1080 instead of the 2060. performance is within 5% of each other, you will lose performance/ability of raytracing but if you want maybe $100 more in your pocket after making this pc, it might be worth it.


PS; I do really recommend atleast trying a build before thinking its too hard or dangerous or whatever. I am simplifying just a tiny bit, but if you got a set of mini screwdrivers and general DIY skills, you are basically copying the setup in your pc right now. same chunky power plug for the mobo, same plug for CPU, probably even same power plug for GPU.
 

pulpfiction110

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Reviewing your first post, I suppose you could reuse your PSU and save a bunch. It is only bronze which is below what I'd use, but ok. The difference between bronze and gold efficiency is only 5%, but do remember thats 5% of your used watts being wasted; using 200w gaming for an hour? That's 10 down the drain more than gold.

Your hdd/ssd you could use for storage/os and save even more. 250gb is still enough for a windows install and essential speedy programs. Editing files with a fast PC on a slow HDD on the other hand could bottleneck. I don't know exactly how resource hungry lightroom is, but ssd can shave time off almost anything, how much will depend on what you are specifically doing.

Your case, maybe cooler with a adapter bracket, would fit the new mobo, its the same size as your current. (As long as the case is called ATX, midi case, full tower it'll fit all 3 sizes of consumer boards)

It really does depend how much time you'll spend gaming vs working/editing. with Ryzens gains over AMD's older cpu, and Intel not bringing anything much better in the last couple gen, you could simplify the choice down to between intel edging out ahead for gaming, and Ryzen the same for editing, based on the core count and such being equal.
With gaming generally being more GPU based, I would assume that any multiuse PC for working and gaming, as long as it has a good GPU, would probably be better off ryzen.

But, if you are set on intel then this
PCPartPicker Part List

Type|Item|Price
:----|:----|:----
CPU | Intel Core i7-9700 3 GHz 8-Core Processor | $339.99 @ B&H
Motherboard | Asus PRIME Z390-A ATX LGA1151 Motherboard | $179.99 @ Best Buy
Memory | G.Skill Ripjaws V 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 CL19 Memory | $129.99 @ Newegg
Video Card | Gigabyte GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB OC Rev 2.0 Video Card | $319.99 @ Best Buy
| Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts |
| Total | $969.96
| Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-06-04 16:44 EDT-0400 |

More cores but no hyperthreading (intel 8c vs previous Ryzen 6c/12t) and taking off the PSU/SSD. The slight upgrade over the other build is a mobo with 2 m.2 slots, although none specifically for wifi.

You may be able to save even more by going with a 2nd hand gtx 1080 instead of the 2060. performance is within 5% of each other, you will lose performance/ability of raytracing but if you want maybe $100 more in your pocket after making this pc, it might be worth it.


PS; I do really recommend atleast trying a build before thinking its too hard or dangerous or whatever. I am simplifying just a tiny bit, but if you got a set of mini screwdrivers and general DIY skills, you are basically copying the setup in your pc right now. same chunky power plug for the mobo, same plug for CPU, probably even same power plug for GPU.
You are awesome. Thanks for creating another setup for me.

CountMike was hinting earlier that a new PSU is just a better idea for a new build. Would I be taking a risk by keeping my current one?

Any reason why you recommend i7-9700 for me?

What is the disadvantage of my old SSD compared to a new one?

Also, I'm thinking I'd get a 2060, like the one you recommend, preowned off ebay to save some dinero. Bad idea?

Regarding building it myself, it's mainly cause I'm LAZY...or more so I'm swamped with work and kids these days. But you're right. I'm going to attempt to build again. Last time I did it, I had a little scare when it wasn't working, but solved it somehow. Good point regarding just needing to copy current setup for the most part.

Edit: What exactly do you mean by "cooler with a adapter bracket"?
I have this which I never got a chance to install on my current rig: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/hmtCmG/cooler-master-cpu-cooler-rr212e20pkr2
 
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natcha12

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Your PSU will be ok, just like you i have mine from 5 years ago :D They are getting way more efficient though like I explained, so for the next upgrade down the line, maybe keep an eye on deals for them.

You are on a budget so i suggested the 9700 as its ~20% cheaper than the newest i7 10700. If you wanted to go a little over and get that CPU, you get hyperthreading but not much else improved, BUT, you would need the next gen motherboard too which has a slight premium. Any of these similar boards would do great with a 10700, just depends which you'd find cheaper or prefer the look of, maybe you'd like RGB flashing away when you're driving in Forza lol;
https://pcpartpicker.com/products/motherboard/#s=39&f=2&E=2,5&O=1,2

Your old/current ssd will be good day to day, or, you get a tiny noticeable boost going from a SATA 500MB/s ssd to a NVME 3000MB/s for OS drive, with the leftover + old ssd for fast access storage, HDD for offline/low resource games.

With your cooler, I mean the fixtures. The sockets (the CPU fittings on the motherboard) for LGA1150 which is your current version, could need different screws for 1151 or 1200. I did look but i couldn't find a straight answer and i don't own one myself.

Personally, the build which is slap bang in the middle of cost/gaming/working would be i710700, 2nd hand gtx1080 (use the money saved by getting 2nd hand on the CPU/mobo), and reuse old ssd and hdd.

Be warned, I'd count almost every card in 10 series and after as safe to buy on ebay, but any before may have been strangled to the edge of death by Bitcoin mining. I think that craze was ending when 10 series came out.
 

pulpfiction110

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Interesting what you'd personally prefer. Been trying to do some research and totally confused myself further.

Any reason why you'd prefer an Intel? I always thought going the AMD route is more risky, but what I'm reading in regards to something like a Ryzen 3700 is that it's better value for the money. Although I'm also reading Intel is less RAM reliant and slightly better for gaming...

Also reading people, like yourself, recommending gtx 1080 over 2060. But isn't the 2060 almost as good, can potentially be better with more mature drivers, and is more future proof? It's especially concerning to me with Ampere around the corner to be more future proof.
 

natcha12

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PS, i think you are talking about a GTX 2060 super in your other posts, seeing as a 2060 has max 6GB VRAM and only a super has 8, obviously this makes it more pricey.

Like is said, I don't know if you're doing 80% work, 20% play or the other way round. But, if you want future proof, I would at this moment get a AMD PCIe 4 compatible motherboard which should handle GPU's 5+ years down the line, along with any dirt cheap processor to keep under budget yet still offer decent performance that could be replaced later.

The GPU is always the trickiest thing. They seem to devalue fastest out of PC components so my suggestion of a 1080 follows the logic that one of those will devalue less than a 2060 would when ampere comes out.

If you can get a 1080 for 350, or a 2060 super for 500, I can tell you right now that both are prob gonna drop like a stone with Amperes arrival, so which would you rather lose the resale value of? 30% of $350 or 500? Also when i said the performance was similar, the extra 5% is porbably in the 1080's favour ;)

That is correct what you read, ryzen value and intel gaming performance. But on the other hand, "Intel less reliant on RAM" is a double edged sword. Slower RAM does not affect them as much, yes, but neither does fast RAM give them a Ryzen-like boost
 

pulpfiction110

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Which AMD PCIe 4 compatible motherboard would be a safe bet for a Ryzen 3700 or better? But help me understand why it's more future proof that an i7? Also, would 32gb of RAM, which is what I'd get, be more advantageous with a Ryzen based on what you're suggesting?

Regarding the 2060, that is correct - 8gb version. Figured I'd be more future proof that way. Would you still pick 1080 over it? Probably would get it pre-owned.

I'm also now thinking based on what you're saying that it may just be a good idea to hold off buying one until Ampere actually gets released...
 

natcha12

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A ryzen would be better than an i7 and more future proof just simply because of the PCIe4. Intel just does NOT have any board that uses it, yet.
Plus for AMD.

The competing top of the range current boards are AMD X570 and Intel Z490. Think of the number of PCIe lanes of a board as a kind of currency. You want a very fast SSD slot? That costs 4x PCIe gen 3 or 2x Gen 4 (because 4 is twice the speed), things add up fast with all the additional features. In the end, you will either be buying a Intel board with up to 24, or a AMD with up to a comparable 32 (16 PCIe4 x 2).
These boards are pretty much equally priced, so thats a plus for AMD.

You are misunderstanding the RAM. Capacity and speed are seperate. 32 is all well and good but the Gigahertz is what you should look at. I suggested 2x 16gb sticks at 3600Ghz instead of the bog standard 2400Ghz because that is where you hit the premium paywall for anything faster, reduced gains for more money dropped on them.

GPU; If anybody asks me for a build idea without a timescale, i assume it means right then and there, so I offer then and there parts. If you say you could hold off then you should till Ampere, whether you are getting that or last gen, for sure.

In 3 years you'll be able to look at your Ryzen build and could add 2 more ram slots to get 64g, could possibly get the next/latest compatible CPU upgrade for your board, could get the best GPU on the market and enjoy that sweet up to 128GB bandwidth (a current 2080Ti uses well under half of that). Get a 10Gig ethernet port add-in. Shove in the 3d printing, laser powered PCIe card that connects directly with your brain they make a few years from now :ROFLMAO:

Here you go. Might seem weird paying more for the board than the processor, but thats what happens when you have a monopoly on a new technology.
CPU/RAM/board for $600:
PCPartPicker Part List
 

pulpfiction110

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Well then...I'll definitely need to make sure I'm future proofing for direct nueral and brain connectivity.

So based on what you're suggesting and what I've been reading, I'm going to hold off with the build until Nvidia, AMD, and Intel release their next gen gpu's. Maybe they'll even be worth it for my build. I just had an itch to do it now since I'm cooped up at home due to covid19 shenanigans. Still kind of want to, but I know it's just smarter to hold off a bit.

I'm going to go by your last parts list when I decide to actually do it. Maybe even go with the X version of 3600 or even 3700? Also, maybe CL16 variant of that RAM? Might even get a larger, newer SSD and another spinning HD as well.
 
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puppyboynate

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PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor ($166.89 @ Walmart)
Motherboard: MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard ($114.99 @ Best Buy)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 CL16 Memory ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 CL16 Memory ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Team GX2 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($89.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: ASRock Radeon RX 5700 XT 8 GB Phantom Gaming D OC Video Card ($383.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: *EVGA B5 650 W 80+ Bronze Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($96.98 @ Newegg)
Total: $1,012.81
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available

instead of the rtx 2060 super i chose the amd radeon rx 5700 xt because it performs between an rtx 2070 and rtx 2070 super and also it was cheaper.
 

pulpfiction110

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Thanks, puppy.

Is there any advantage to pairing a Radeon GPU with an AMD CPU?

Also, since I'll be holding off till next gen GPU's come out, maybe by then it'll be a much more future proof decision to get a Ryzen 4000 series...
 

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