Question 2070 super getting worse frames than a 1060

Paul-Smenis

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Hi,

Just upgraded to a 2070 super from my 1060 6GB. a pretty strong upgrade but im actually getting lower graphics than when I had the 1060. I have all newest drivers installed for the 2070. Is there anything that would be causing this?

Thanks!
 

Paul-Smenis

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full system spec? include brand and model of the psu

cpu/gpu temp and usage during the game?
ram/ssd usage during the game?
i5-9600k
2070 super FE
ASUS 390P modo
PSU im not really 100%.. I think EVGA 650W gold

I am seeing 95+ cpu usage on valorant though with medium settings. Never happened when I had the 1060. What could cause that?
 

Phaaze88

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Just opened it up. EVGA 600W
https://pcpartpicker.com/products/power-supply/#m=14&A=600000000000
There's like 6 of those, not all built to the same quality. Can you specify?

I am seeing 95+ cpu usage on valorant though with medium settings. Never happened when I had the 1060. What could cause that?
A couple things come to mind.
1)The stronger gpu demands more work from the cpu to keep up with it. The system is now cpu core/thread limited under the same settings you used with the older gpu.
It's a balancing act. The system was more balanced with the old gpu.
If the primary command thread(the one that handles all the game commands, basically) is maxed, that's it - the cpu can't deliver any more performance.
Now you have to change current in game settings so the cpu isn't pegged as hard, or replace the cpu with something faster.


2)Something you downloaded and installed around the time you changed hardware is coincidentally eating up cpu cycles.
What that could be, I've no idea.
If there's nothing of note, then I think it's back to #1.
 
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Paul-Smenis

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https://pcpartpicker.com/products/power-supply/#m=14&A=600000000000
There's like 6 of those, not all built to the same quality. Can you specify?


A couple things come to mind.
1)The stronger gpu demands more work from the cpu to keep up with it. The system is now cpu core/thread limited under the same settings you used with the older gpu.
It's a balancing act. The system was more balanced with the old gpu.
If the primary command thread(the one that handles all the game commands, basically) is maxed, that's it - the cpu can't deliver any more performance.
Now you have to change current in game settings so the cpu isn't pegged as hard, or replace the cpu with something faster.


2)Something you downloaded and installed around the time you changed hardware is coincidentally eating up cpu cycles.
What that could be, I've no idea.
If there's nothing of note, then I think it's back to #1.
https://www.bestbuy.com/site/evga-w1-series-600w-atx-12v-eps-12v-80-plus-power-supply-black/8511029.p?skuId=8511029

I have this PSU atm. Are there any frame issues I could have from the min requirement being 650w?

So should i just go back to the 1060? I cant upgrade my cpu just yet.
 
Last edited:

Phaaze88

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Yeah, that unit isn't a good pairing with that gpu. Have you observed any black screen signal losses or crashing yet?

So should i just go back to the 1060? I cant upgrade my cpu just yet.
I wouldn't. Work with what you got for now - you just need to change some in game settings.
[I know I'm being vague here, but it's because I don't know exactly which settings you'd have to turn up/down. In some games, the graphics options tell you what certain settings do to the cpu and gpu.]
If the system starts black screening and crashing on you, you won't have a choice but to replace the power supply.

Also, undervolt the gpu so it doesn't stress the psu as hard. Here's a quick how to:
Run Msi Afterburner. Unlink the Power and Temperature Limits - there's a paperclip like icon next to it depending on the skin being used.
Max out only the power limit, and click apply.
Play your games with Afterburner's own hardware monitor running. Make sure both Core Clock and Gpu Voltage are visible.
[If Gpu Voltage is not visible, go to Settings > General tab, check Unlock voltage monitoring, then go to the Monitoring tab, find Gpu Voltage, and check it.]
After a few minutes, check Afterburner's hardware monitor for the MAX Core Clock and Gpu Voltage. Memorize, or write 'em down.
Please close the game, and open Afterburner's Curve Editor. Take the max gpu voltage you recorded, and subtract 0.05v from it. Find the voltage point in the Curve Editor that matches it, or is the closest match, and click on it.
Then use the up arrow key and raise the frequency back up to the max core clock the gpu touched. Lock it with the L key, and click Apply again.
Save the settings in one of the numbered profiles and lock them. Then click the reset key.
Done.

When you want to start up a game, open Afterburner, click the numbered profile it was saved at, and click apply. When you're done, click the Reset button and close Afterburner.


Memory clock, don't touch. It's not as forgiving as fiddling with gpu core clock.
Once a running Vram OC starts to show signs of instability, things start to go downhill from there.
 

Paul-Smenis

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Yeah, that unit isn't a good pairing with that gpu. Have you observed any black screen signal losses or crashing yet?


I wouldn't. Work with what you got for now - you just need to change some in game settings.
[I know I'm being vague here, but it's because I don't know exactly which settings you'd have to turn up/down. In some games, the graphics options tell you what certain settings do to the cpu and gpu.]
If the system starts black screening and crashing on you, you won't have a choice but to replace the power supply.

Also, undervolt the gpu so it doesn't stress the psu as hard. Here's a quick how to:
Run Msi Afterburner. Unlink the Power and Temperature Limits - there's a paperclip like icon next to it depending on the skin being used.
Max out only the power limit, and click apply.
Play your games with Afterburner's own hardware monitor running. Make sure both Core Clock and Gpu Voltage are visible.
[If Gpu Voltage is not visible, go to Settings > General tab, check Unlock voltage monitoring, then go to the Monitoring tab, find Gpu Voltage, and check it.]
After a few minutes, check Afterburner's hardware monitor for the MAX Core Clock and Gpu Voltage. Memorize, or write 'em down.
Please close the game, and open Afterburner's Curve Editor. Take the max gpu voltage you recorded, and subtract 0.05v from it. Find the voltage point in the Curve Editor that matches it, or is the closest match, and click on it.
Then use the up arrow key and raise the frequency back up to the max core clock the gpu touched. Lock it with the L key, and click Apply again.
Save the settings in one of the numbered profiles and lock them. Then click the reset key.
Done.

When you want to start up a game, open Afterburner, click the numbered profile it was saved at, and click apply. When you're done, click the Reset button and close Afterburner.


Memory clock, don't touch. It's not as forgiving as fiddling with gpu core clock.
Once a running Vram OC starts to show signs of instability, things start to go downhill from there.
No crashes or anything like that.

one thing though is that my brother has the same exact setup in terms of GPU and CPU. He was getting no dips in frames and much higher frames than me. Only real difference in our setup is the PSU. I have a 600 and he has a 650.
I can get a 650+ PSU today at Best Buy if you think that could be another solution
 
Oct 7, 2021
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Try everything listed above. Download (if you haven't) Run GPU-Z and find out what your GPUs clocks are running at or use the manufacturer's program. Are they running at clock spec at least?

EDIT: How many pieces of hardware are attached to that 600 Gold PSU? The line powering the GPU should have no other hardware running off of it. Try to aim for that or unplug (unessacary to boot and run) hardware to temporarily test it. I doubt it's power supply issue but it 100% does happen. I'm guessing cores. You can watch your GPU run in task manager to see what (if anything) is putting a load on it when in a 2D environment.
 

Phaaze88

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It's not enough to have the exact same setup. There's also drivers for your hardware, in game settings, and Nvidia Control Panel settings to consider.

As for the psu: wattage always plays second fiddle to the quality of the components inside the unit.
The number does not mean anything in regards to quality.
Reviews are the best way to determine where a unit falls. If there's none available for a unit you're looking at, then you can also resort to tier lists where available, like this one:
I wouldn't suggest going lower than Tier B for that gpu.
 

Phaaze88

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What I noticed from UBM results:
1)Cpu background usage is high. Ideally, it should be 10% or lower.
Close browser and other monitoring software before running UBM. If it's still over 10% after doing that, then you may need to clean up your storage drives, be it running security software to find threats, or removing programs you no longer use.

2)Cpu did not hit max turbo on all cores, which is 4.3ghz. Here, it only went as high as 4.1ghz.[I know it says 4.05, but it rounds up.]
Possible causes:
-Whatever is causing the high background usage.
-Windows was not clean installed when you carried over the C drive from the last build, and thus you have registry files left over from that.
-If this was a brand new build, then chipset drivers may need updating.

3)Honestly, all 3 storage drives have too much on them and need to be cleaned up.
Also, see if there are firmware updates for the 2 Samsung drives.
 
Oct 7, 2021
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^ I am betting on chipset drivers as Phaaze suggested. Go through all 3 steps he provided. It might be worthwhile to check/screen cap Device Manager. You could* try updating the Chipset Drivers through that but 100% follow the above suggestions. The data you provided points to chipset/bus issues. Hope this solves it for you! Let us know please! :)
 

Paul-Smenis

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^ I am betting on chipset drivers as Phaaze suggested. Go through all 3 steps he provided. It might be worthwhile to check/screen cap Device Manager. You could* try updating the Chipset Drivers through that but 100% follow the above suggestions. The data you provided points to chipset/bus issues. Hope this solves it for you! Let us know please! :)
Was about to do what he said but ran into some more issues with booting. Posted in systems if any of you have some pointers
 

Vic 40

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Was about to do what he said but ran into some more issues with booting. Posted in systems if any of you have some pointers
That could be a pointer towards the psu as well, so might be best to upgrade that first. What budget would you have?

If this would be software might it be good to reinstall windows. But "issues" is a loose term so what issues are you talking about.
 
That could be a pointer towards the psu as well, so might be best to upgrade that first. What budget would you have?

If this would be software might it be good to reinstall windows. But "issues" is a loose term so what issues are you talking about.
I bought 10x of these same power supplies via EVGA B-stock on midweek madness a few months ago.

They have been paired with 3060 ti's, 3070 ti's, a 3080 and a rx 6800xt.

We have had zero issues with these not being powerful enough for gaming use all paired with a 5600x.

Just my 2cents good luck.
 

sycoreaper

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Ancient tried and true. Reinstall Windows. Sometimes there are just issues that can't be tracked down. I bought a brand new laptop and out of the box the install had a few bugs that I couldn't get fixed. No matter the guides, drivers, etc.. Reinstall fixed.

I hate reinstalls, I hate recommending them, I hate when they are recommended. Sometimes it's just the best troubleshooting step.
 

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