Question 32 vs 64 bit Systems With Respect To Onboard Graphics

michael diemer

Distinguished
Feb 2, 2013
159
0
18,690
4
This is a bit complicated. I have a 10 + yr old Gateway desktop (GT5656). Originally, it came with Vista 32 bit and 3 GB ram. Eventually I figured out it could be 64 bit, so I installed Windows 7 64 bit. I installed a dedicated graphics card, and boosted the ram to 8GB (although it works better with 6, so I took out 2 GB). W7 is on a HDD. Additionally, I have a SSD with Zorin 15, and and another HDD with LXLE (both Linux systems). I use this computer just for browsing and email. The only games are Solitaire and Mahjong.

A week or so ago my graphics card died (8400 GS). So, I'm back to onboard graphics. I could buy another card, but it's like putting money into an old car. I'm reluctant to do it. So, here's what has happened since: Windows 7-64 adjusted perfectly, it found the Nvidia drivers it needed. Zorin 15 Core would not work at all. So I replaced it with Zorin 15 Lite, 32 bits. I also am testing out LXLE as 32 bits. In addition, I test-installed several other light Linux systems (such as Xubuntu, Mint XFCE, etc).

The result so far is that most of the operating systems quickly developed display promlems. They are using Nouveau drivers (I'm not sure the legacy Nvidia drivers, the 304.x series, will work as the Linux systems are new, and the onboard graphics are 10+ yrs old. I figure the reason Windows 7 works is because it is as old as the computer itself, or nearly. But the Linux systems are using the latest Linux kernel).

Here is the weird part, and it's going to sound counter-intuitive, if not downright crazy: I am thinking that 32 bit Linux systems will actually work better with these old graphics than 64 bit systems, because the 32 bit systems themselves are so much lighter than the 64 bit systems. Thus making an overall lighter demand on everything, including graphics. This computer seems designed with 32 bit systems in mind. Which means the graphics need lighter systems. That is why I am reinstalling my Linux systems as light, 32 bit ones. So far, Zorin Lite and LXLE (both 32 bit and both lite systems) are doing fine.

My question is, does this rationale make sense? Would 32 bit systems work better, in view of the old onboard graphics? Incidentally, the chipset is 6150SE. Hopefully someone here can help me make some sense out of all this!
 

Mrgr74

Notable
Sep 2, 2019
700
146
890
98
This is a bit complicated. I have a 10 + yr old Gateway desktop (GT5656). Originally, it came with Vista 32 bit and 3 GB ram. Eventually I figured out it could be 64 bit, so I installed Windows 7 64 bit. I installed a dedicated graphics card, and boosted the ram to 8GB (although it works better with 6, so I took out 2 GB). W7 is on a HDD. Additionally, I have a SSD with Zorin 15, and and another HDD with LXLE (both Linux systems). I use this computer just for browsing and email. The only games are Solitaire and Mahjong.

A week or so ago my graphics card died (8400 GS). So, I'm back to onboard graphics. I could buy another card, but it's like putting money into an old car. I'm reluctant to do it. So, here's what has happened since: Windows 7-64 adjusted perfectly, it found the Nvidia drivers it needed. Zorin 15 Core would not work at all. So I replaced it with Zorin 15 Lite, 32 bits. I also am testing out LXLE as 32 bits. In addition, I test-installed several other light Linux systems (such as Xubuntu, Mint XFCE, etc).

The result so far is that most of the operating systems quickly developed display promlems. They are using Nouveau drivers (I'm not sure the legacy Nvidia drivers, the 304.x series, will work as the Linux systems are new, and the onboard graphics are 10+ yrs old. I figure the reason Windows 7 works is because it is as old as the computer itself, or nearly. But the Linux systems are using the latest Linux kernel).

Here is the weird part, and it's going to sound counter-intuitive, if not downright crazy: I am thinking that 32 bit Linux systems will actually work better with these old graphics than 64 bit systems, because the 32 bit systems themselves are so much lighter than the 64 bit systems. Thus making an overall lighter demand on everything, including graphics. This computer seems designed with 32 bit systems in mind. Which means the graphics need lighter systems. That is why I am reinstalling my Linux systems as light, 32 bit ones. So far, Zorin Lite and LXLE (both 32 bit and both lite systems) are doing fine.

My question is, does this rationale make sense? Would 32 bit systems work better, in view of the old onboard graphics? Incidentally, the chipset is 6150SE. Hopefully someone here can help me make some sense out of all this!
Hi @michael diemer,

How much RAM does your system have NOW? the 6GB? If over 4Gb (like your above mentioned 8GB, then 6GB) your 32bit system won't address over the 4GB limitations unless your Linux has the PAE kernel enabled, then you can go up to, I believe 64GB, though I'd have to verify. As for a dedicated GPU, if your onboard works for what you need, then by all means use it. Browsing, email and the odd-Youtube or Netflix video won't tax the onboard much. Also your Gateway only officially supports 4GB of DDR2-667.

Whats your CPU? The stock Athalon 64 x2 6000?

As for it being an old system, up until last week, an 11 year old 1090T system was in use as a primary gaming system by my daughter. (Albeit not a very fast one) If you are going to stick with a 32bit OS, regardless, no point in putting much $$ into it.

Your dedicated GPU uses part of your DDR2. Up to 128MB. Here's an older forum post about your 6000+
 
Last edited:

michael diemer

Distinguished
Feb 2, 2013
159
0
18,690
4
Thanks for your reply, Mrgr 74. Yes, the Athlon 64 x2 6000+ is the CPU. And yes I have the 6GB of DDR2 ram in there. So far, so good. But time will tell. I'll check out the link you provided, and thanks again.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS