[SOLVED] 3770k from hell

m0niyaw

Commendable
Feb 9, 2020
17
0
1,510
0
(Not sure if this belongs here or in Cooling)

3770k
16gb 4x4 DDR3 1333Mhz
ROG 1070 Ti
TZ77B
CM Extreme 2 725W (not even 80+)
WD 500Gb 5200rpm 3.5”
Corsair AIO (forgot the exact model)

Yesterday I upgraded from a low profile 1050 Ti to an ROG 1070 Ti.
I noticed that my CPU temps are skyrocketing, it’s idling between 37 and 44 but the max temps now reach 92-94C when playing demanding games like Warzone.
I also had a brief experience where even idling temperatures reached past 80C.

Before I was running it at 4.2 comfortably with temperatures ranging from 31 at idle to 80 under max load. Now I have to revert to stock voltage and clock just to keep it from overheating while playing minecraft.

At first I blamed the AIO but now I’m starting to think that the PSU isn’t delivering power evenly throughout all my components, including the AIO. Could this be the case? Tomorrow I will be applying new thermal paste and see how that goes.
 
Could be an issue with the power supply, but it also could be that your cpu is just getting exercised more for your application and hence gets hotter. I think trying the thermal paste first is a good place to start.

I would also check your case fans as all that heat needs to get out of the case.
 
Could be an issue with the power supply, but it also could be that your cpu is just getting exercised more for your application and hence gets hotter. I think trying the thermal paste first is a good place to start.

I would also check your case fans as all that heat needs to get out of the case.
 

m0niyaw

Commendable
Feb 9, 2020
17
0
1,510
0
Even with both panels open there’s no difference in temperatures. What makes me really think is the fact that for awhile today I was getting climbing temperatures even in the BIOS without being under load at all, as if the pump wasn’t working.
This leads me to believe it could be the PSU messing with voltages since it’s not 80+ certified.
My previous GPU drew power from the mobo hence why I never had problems. This is just a theory but I will be able to know more once I replace the paste. CPU temps have no business climbing in BIOS for no reason.

Can’t wait to to put my 2700x in my build once I get the B450 on Wednesday but I’m afraid I’m gonna need a better power supply.
 

DSzymborski

Titan
Moderator
I'm not sure it's causing the temperature issues, but it's a good idea to replace this PSU anyway; it's a pile of garbage. One of the more dishonest PSUs offered by a major retailer. It's not even capable of 725 watts under any situation; they're actually simply using 725 in the model name. That's a highly unethical practice.

And since it's an ancient, group-regulated PSU, it doesn't even get to the 658.9 watts, it's spec, in +12V power, but only 600. It doesn't even have active PFC. PSUs from this model fall out of ATX spec for voltage regulation and electronic ripple, and ATX spec is laughably loose here. I'd have never used this PSU in anything I enjoy owning.

It's possible but I suspect giving more for the CPU to do has exposed a weakness in your cooling solution. But since you ought to replace the PSU under all circumstances, it's certainly worth replacing the PSU and then checking again.
 

m0niyaw

Commendable
Feb 9, 2020
17
0
1,510
0
I'm not sure it's causing the temperature issues, but it's a good idea to replace this PSU anyway; it's a pile of garbage. One of the more dishonest PSUs offered by a major retailer. It's not even capable of 725 watts under any situation; they're actually simply using 725 in the model name. That's a highly unethical practice.

And since it's an ancient, group-regulated PSU, it doesn't even get to the 658.9 watts, it's spec, in +12V power, but only 600. It doesn't even have active PFC. PSUs from this model fall out of ATX spec for voltage regulation and electronic ripple, and ATX spec is laughably loose here. I'd have never used this PSU in anything I enjoy owning.

It's possible but I suspect giving more for the CPU to do has exposed a weakness in your cooling solution. But since you ought to replace the PSU under all circumstances, it's certainly worth replacing the PSU and then checking again.
It is a pile of garbage, I would never purchase something so low in quality, I’m planning of upgrading everything in my system pretty soon for the exception of the AIO (just needs AM4 brackets), I am trying to diagnose the problem with my components in order to eventually repurpose them for a media centre build. I will be installing a B450 with new memory and a 2700x on Wednesday, I’m afraid though I will be stuck with this PSU until later on (it’s a gradual upgrade).
Hopefully I will be able to test my system with a borrowed 550W 80+ bronze PSU soon.

I thought I was crazy thinking a 725W PSU could be causing problems within the build, glad I wasn’t wrong thinking that...
 

DSzymborski

Titan
Moderator
I'll be honest; I'd be extremely uncomfortable using this at all with a new build. At the very least, certainly not with a 1070 Ti. This should have been the first problem remedied, not the last. This isn't a case of "this sandwich isn't very good, but I'm hungry" but one of "this sandwich has broken glass in it, so it doesn't matter if I'm hungry."
 
Reactions: m0niyaw

m0niyaw

Commendable
Feb 9, 2020
17
0
1,510
0
I'll be honest; I'd be extremely uncomfortable using this at all with a new build. At the very least, certainly not with a 1070 Ti. This should have been the first problem remedied, not the last. This isn't a case of "this sandwich isn't very good, but I'm hungry" but one of "this sandwich has broken glass in it, so it doesn't matter if I'm hungry."
Makes a lot of sense, I have spoken to a friend of mine and I will get to keep the borrowed PSU until I can upgrade to a better own for my system. I don’t wanna take chances.
 

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