[SOLVED] 3900x only boosting to 3.9GHz multicore, 4.5GHz single core. PBO enabled. Is this right?

Oxicoi

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I know the 3900x is a tiny tiny bit old, but I don't think I have been getting the full potential it is supposed to push. I have an ASUS x570-e Strix motherboard and I'm sure it's capable of pushing the 3900x to its' max limits.

Things I have enabled and disabled is PBO and Global-C State. I have DOCP enabled too, with 3600mhz and 1800 FLCK.
 
I've done the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, with 3rd being Ryzen Master since that accurately reads AMD ryzen cpu's. The behavior it shows is that it goes up to 3.9GHz-4.0GHz on multithreaded workload, with singlecore workload at 4.2GHz (which it should go to 4.6GHz). Temps never go to 80C. They are mid 70's.

I do have a -0.1 offset.
Try HWInfo64 if you haven't. RyzenMaster's not always as accurate as you think, especially for reporting core clocks, and has a polling period that's way too long, so you miss a lot of transitions.

Another failing of Ryzenmaster; it doesn't offer as many options as BIOS' usually do for voltage control. But I suggest you don't just jump in with a -0.100V offset, instead start small. Maybe -0.0125 instead...run some benches to see if it's improving or degrading, then maybe -0.0250 and so on. No two systems are the same, what works for someone else is almost certain to not work as well for yours.
 

beorn

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Well..I wouldn't exactly call it old...lol. To tell you the truth, my 3900X runs coolest and fastest on stock settings without PBO and a 0.1 negative voltage offset. Passmark CPU 34300. Cinebench 23 multi - 19000. Single - Mid-upper 1300s, forget exactly. Cinebench 20 multi - 7300-7350, single core 515-530, and my RAM is only 32 GB 3200 mhz
 
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Oxicoi

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Well..I wouldn't exactly call it old...lol. To tell you the truth, my 3900X runs coolest and fastest on stock settings without PBO and a 0.1 negative voltage offset. Passmark CPU 34300. Cinebench 23 multi - 19000. Single - Mid-upper 1300s, forget exactly. Cinebench 20 multi - 7300-7350, single core 515-530, and my RAM is only 32 GB 3200 mhz
What does your speed go up to though? Both multi and single?

What's your CPU cooler?
It's a 360mm DeepCool
 

Oxicoi

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I've seen the 3900xt get 4.3ghz auto PBO enabled across all cores. My 3900x only goes to 3.9ghz. Why is this? I can't even get 4.6ghz on single core.
 
I know the 3900x is a tiny tiny bit old, but I don't think I have been getting the full potential it is supposed to push. I have an ASUS x570-e Strix motherboard and I'm sure it's capable of pushing the 3900x to its' max limits.

Things I have enabled and disabled is PBO and Global-C State. I have DOCP enabled too, with 3600mhz and 1800 FLCK.
To help it boost it's best it's all in the setup.

First is to make sure BIOS is up to date as many boards' shipping BIOS' are woefully out of date. Be sure to do a CMOS reset after updating. In fact, it's probably a good idea to just do it before setting this just to be confident of starting fresh. Go ahead and enable DOCP for your memory after.

Second is to install the AMD chipset drivers from the AMD web site; also because the chipset drivers are often out of date on motherboard support web sites. Run the Ryzen Balanced power plan the drivers installed UNALTERED, that's important.

Third is set up BIOS:
CPU Core Voltage and Clock to AUTO​
ENABLE ALL of the following: AMD Cool n Quiet, Advance C States, Processor CPPC, and CPPC Preferred Cores.​

Last is to get HWInfo64, set the Polling Period to 500mS and look at Core Multiplier or Core Clock for each core. You can make each into a graph. Watch each core boosting over time. Run some simple, light desktop apps: I like to run a Defender QuickScan. It should boost the preferred cores most frequently.

AFTER seeing the boost behavior in AUTO, you can try experimenting with VCore negative offsets as many see an improvement in boosting with slight negative offset. But be sure to test for performance with CB20 as you can go too far and it will hurt scores.

Enabling PBO doesn't always help with light load boosting, or single thread benchmark scores. It should help with holding clocks as the CPU works really hard on multithreaded workloads though. But it also gets really hot too. That means it needs much better cooling to actually see performance results in multithread benches or it will just pull back on clocks to keep temperature in control.
 
Last edited:

Oxicoi

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Feb 7, 2017
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To help it boost it's best it's all in the setup.

First is to make sure BIOS is up to date as many boards' shipping BIOS' are woefully out of date. Be sure to do a CMOS reset after updating. In fact, it's probably a good idea to just do it before setting this just to be confident of starting fresh. Go ahead and enable DOCP for your memory after.

Second is to install the AMD chipset drivers from the AMD web site; also because the chipset drivers are often out of date on motherboard support web sites. Run the Ryzen Balanced power plan the drivers installed UNALTERED, that's important.

Third is set up BIOS:
CPU Core Voltage and Clock to AUTO​
ENABLE ALL of the following: AMD Cool n Quiet, Advance C States, Processor CPPC, and CPPC Preferred Cores.​

Last is to get HWInfo64, set the Polling Period to 500mS and look at Core Multiplier or Core Clock for each core. You can make each into a graph. Watch each core boosting over time. Run some simple, light desktop apps: I like to run a Defender QuickScan. It should boost the preferred cores most frequently.

AFTER seeing the boost behavior in AUTO, you can try experimenting with VCore negative offsets as many see an improvement in boosting with slight negative offset. But be sure to test for performance with CB20 as you can go too far and it will hurt scores.

Enabling PBO doesn't always help with light load boosting, or single thread benchmark scores. It should help with holding clocks as the CPU works really hard on multithreaded workloads though. But it also gets really hot too. That means it needs much better cooling to actually see performance results in multithread benches or it will just pull back on clocks to keep temperature in control.
I've done the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, with 3rd being Ryzen Master since that accurately reads AMD ryzen cpu's. The behavior it shows is that it goes up to 3.9GHz-4.0GHz on multithreaded workload, with singlecore workload at 4.2GHz (which it should go to 4.6GHz). Temps never go to 80C. They are mid 70's.

I do have a -0.1 offset.
 
I've done the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, with 3rd being Ryzen Master since that accurately reads AMD ryzen cpu's. The behavior it shows is that it goes up to 3.9GHz-4.0GHz on multithreaded workload, with singlecore workload at 4.2GHz (which it should go to 4.6GHz). Temps never go to 80C. They are mid 70's.

I do have a -0.1 offset.
Try HWInfo64 if you haven't. RyzenMaster's not always as accurate as you think, especially for reporting core clocks, and has a polling period that's way too long, so you miss a lot of transitions.

Another failing of Ryzenmaster; it doesn't offer as many options as BIOS' usually do for voltage control. But I suggest you don't just jump in with a -0.100V offset, instead start small. Maybe -0.0125 instead...run some benches to see if it's improving or degrading, then maybe -0.0250 and so on. No two systems are the same, what works for someone else is almost certain to not work as well for yours.
 

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