[SOLVED] 4 cables from different routers of 4 Networks in one PC?

uzi314

Prominent
Aug 16, 2018
21
0
510
0
Hello guys:
I wanna use 4 Networks from different ISPs but I have only one ethernet port in my pc and the mobo also doesn't have extra PCIe slots for connecting 4 Port Ethernet PCIe Card/adapter so can I use something like LAN Port Splitter but will I also get more adapters in Change Adapter Settings in Windows or not by using this Splitter or I must use something else because I don't want assigning IPs over and over again on one adapter after I have done using one Network?
 
There is no way to use any form of port splitter to accomplish this. These devices allow you to use a single cable to connect 2 pair of ports as though you have 2 physical cables.

You could try a multi wan router and all the nasty business of how you select ISP would be in that box.

The other somewhat simple option would be to assign ip address say 192.168.1.1. 192.168.1.2 192.168.1.3 and 192.168.1.4 to the routers. You would plug the routers together via their lan ports. You would have to disable the DHCP function and use all static ip.

You would then manually set the route in your pc for which connection would be used.

The last option which I am not sure what microsoft supports and if you need certain version of windows is to use vlan support. This was changed a lot from release to release and I never bothered to see.

In any case your device driver needs to support this. You would also need a switch that supports vlans. What you would end up with is 4 tagged vlans on the same physical port. It would make it appear as if you have 4 actual cables in your router.
 
Reactions: uzi314
There is no way to use any form of port splitter to accomplish this. These devices allow you to use a single cable to connect 2 pair of ports as though you have 2 physical cables.

You could try a multi wan router and all the nasty business of how you select ISP would be in that box.

The other somewhat simple option would be to assign ip address say 192.168.1.1. 192.168.1.2 192.168.1.3 and 192.168.1.4 to the routers. You would plug the routers together via their lan ports. You would have to disable the DHCP function and use all static ip.

You would then manually set the route in your pc for which connection would be used.

The last option which I am not sure what microsoft supports and if you need certain version of windows is to use vlan support. This was changed a lot from release to release and I never bothered to see.

In any case your device driver needs to support this. You would also need a switch that supports vlans. What you would end up with is 4 tagged vlans on the same physical port. It would make it appear as if you have 4 actual cables in your router.
 
Reactions: uzi314

uzi314

Prominent
Aug 16, 2018
21
0
510
0
There is no way to use any form of port splitter to accomplish this. These devices allow you to use a single cable to connect 2 pair of ports as though you have 2 physical cables.

You could try a multi wan router and all the nasty business of how you select ISP would be in that box.

The other somewhat simple option would be to assign ip address say 192.168.1.1. 192.168.1.2 192.168.1.3 and 192.168.1.4 to the routers. You would plug the routers together via their lan ports. You would have to disable the DHCP function and use all static ip.

You would then manually set the route in your pc for which connection would be used.

The last option which I am not sure what microsoft supports and if you need certain version of windows is to use vlan support. This was changed a lot from release to release and I never bothered to see.

In any case your device driver needs to support this. You would also need a switch that supports vlans. What you would end up with is 4 tagged vlans on the same physical port. It would make it appear as if you have 4 actual cables in your router.
Again a lot of thanks @bill001g! I've got it. I think disabling the dhcp and using all static IPs would be best!
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
Again a lot of thanks @bill001g! I've got it. I think disabling the dhcp and using all static IPs would be best!
He also said add static ROUTES, Taht is a much more difficult thing than just setting static IPs. Because that means you have to know the IP addresses for stream and assign them to router 1. And the addresses for twitter and assign to router 2 and the IPs for twitch and assign to router three etc.
If you are just trying to get PC#1 to go to router 1 and PC#2 to go to router 2 it isn't as difficult. But since your original post mentioned a single PC, you have to set static routes for individual domains on that PC to explicitly route traffic to the "desired" router.
 

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