[SOLVED] 4 x 8Gb vs 2 x 16Gb

Prawnapple

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Dec 24, 2014
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I just bought 2 x 8Gb of ram on my new build. Apparently over-clocking may be an issue if I purchase another 2 x 8Gb (4 x 8Gb in total). This would apparently be due to my dram voltage I would need to tweak? So my question is, should I want to overclock, should I return my 2x8Gb and go 2 x 16 Gb or will I be fine to go 4 x 8Gb and just tweak my voltage when or if I overlock?
This is my build:

CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 3700x Octa Core - 3.6GHz
Motherboard: MSI X570-A PRO AMD X570
Ram: G.Skill F4-3200C16D-16GVKB Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2x8GB) DDR4-3200MHz
SSD/HDD: 1 x Mushkin MKNSSDSR 250GB
GPU: Gigabyte GTX 1070
PSU: Antec EAG750 EarthWatts Gold Pro Series 750W 80+ Gold
CPU Cooler: Liquid Cooling
Chassis: Phanteks PH-ES614PTG_BK Enthoo Pro ATX Full Tower
OS: Windows 10 Pro
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Regardless of overclocking, 2 x16GB is the better choice, so yes, that would be preferred. It's a lot less stress on the memory controller and it's a lot more likely to be capable of you getting them to POST at the XMP profile settings without a good deal of tweaking and tinkering around with settings in order to get them to do so.

It will also result in lower CPU temps since four memory modules means running twice as much voltage through the CPU as with two.
 
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Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Regardless of overclocking, 2 x16GB is the better choice, so yes, that would be preferred. It's a lot less stress on the memory controller and it's a lot more likely to be capable of you getting them to POST at the XMP profile settings without a good deal of tweaking and tinkering around with settings in order to get them to do so.

It will also result in lower CPU temps since four memory modules means running twice as much voltage through the CPU as with two.
 
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Prawnapple

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Dec 24, 2014
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Regardless of overclocking, 2 x16GB is the better choice, so yes, that would be preferred. It's a lot less stress on the memory controller and it's a lot more likely to be capable of you getting them to POST at the XMP profile settings without a good deal of tweaking and tinkering around with settings in order to get them to do so.

It will also result in lower CPU temps since four memory modules means running twice as much voltage through the CPU as with two.
Thanks, just the info I needed!
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Don't be obtuse. You know damn well that running whatever voltage, 1.2v, 1.35v, 1.4v, through four DIMMs is double the AMOUNT of voltage, not double the VOLTS, and that running two power feeds through an electronic device or component is going to generate less heat than four power feeds will.

This is a well known fact, particularly in regard to making decisions about whether to run dual or quad DIMM configurations.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
No, I did not mean double the amount of current because that would be no different than double the amount of voltage, and obviously I did not mean that adding two more sticks means 2.7v would be flowing through the CPU any more than I meant double the current would be flowing through it. What I did mean is that you'd have double the number of circuits actively allowing current and voltage to flow through the CPU, since four memory modules means there are two more paths being utilized through the CPU than with one. Again, you are being intentionally obtuse in regard to the semantics of the thing when you know exactly what I am referring to. But whatever.

In ANY case, the actual Thermal design power usage amount owing directly to memory operations, is doubled, when four modules are installed versus when only two are installed, and that has a direct impact on both the thermal activity in the CPU and the long term effects, to whatever degree memory is responsible, of electromigration, we can assume are likely doubled as well. Not to mention the fact that USUALLY when you use four DIMMs versus two, you DO also sometimes have to increase the voltage in order to get the full amount of installed memory to not only play nice at the profile settings but to do so stably as well. So in that regard, yes, there will likely be an increase in required voltage in addition to having two more current paths active through the memory controller.
 
obviously I did not mean that adding two more sticks means 2.7v would be flowing through the CPU
Good. :) Because previously you said exactly that:

since four memory modules means running twice as much voltage through the CPU as with two.
I don't mean any obtusiveness. Simply some of your statements are plain wrong.
You might need to refresh some of your knowledge in physics - especially classical electrodynamics.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Ok, let's be clearer then, since you seem to be stuck on semantics which nobody else would ever be concerned about or nitpick over. Which isn't particularly surprising since that seems to be a common tactic of yours at times.

Let's try saying it this way instead.

Running two sticks of DRAM puts less stress on the memory controller than four. Less electricity is needed, the memory controller needs less voltage to remain stable and, while it isn’t noticeable, the DRAM runs ever so slightly quicker (generally).
 

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