[SOLVED] 4k max settings gaming 60fps on 60hrz tv

Jan 18, 2019
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Hello,

im going to buy rtx 2080 ti to play single player campaign games with 4k maxed out graphic settings with 60 fps. (Im not going to play any competitive games that need more frames.)

I have:

i7 6700k
Crucial MX200 500 GB SSD (2,5" SATA 3.0)
EVGa 550 GS
Gigabyte GA-Z170N-WIFI motherboard
Kingston HyperX Fury Black 2 x 8 GB (DDR4, 2666 MHz, CL15)

Im going to buy 43 inch 4k tv with 60hrz?

So, what do you think? Is monitor going to be OK?

Will my i7 bottleneck rtx 2080 ti with no overclocking?

Gem
 

Phazoner

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60Hz is perfectly fine, just check if the HDMI ports can handle a 60Hz input. It is also convenient to try to find its input lag or if at least it has a game mode to minimize the input lag. If it hasn't a game mode input lag can be reduced by turning off the image improvements for the HDMI channel.
 
Jan 18, 2019
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MERGED QUESTION
Question from gemart : "43 inch 4k gaming tv best bang for buck"

Hello,

I have rtx 2080 ti and I play AAA story games with 60 fps with controller. I dont play any games that need more than 60 fps.

I would like to buy 43 inch to 50 inch 4k gaming tv. What tv would be best bang for buck?


Thank you!

Gem
 
Using TVs as a PC monitor is typically fine, but some TVs are certainly better then others. I personally use an LG OLED (B6P) as my monitor, and don't have any issues. That being said, some TVs are horrible PC monitors. Check reviews before purchase (Rtings.com does an excellent job at this).

The one thing to remember: HDMI 2.0 can't handle 4k HDR 4:4:4 @ 60 Hz; it simply doesn't have the bandwidth. So for HDR content you'd need to drop to 4:2:2 [most games do this automatically anyways]. Also note most TVs don't support any form of Variable Refresh Rate. Both these issues are being addressed as part of HDMI 2.1, so if you are on the fence you can try and wait for that to start appearing in products.
 
Reactions: gemart
Jan 18, 2019
14
0
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Using TVs as a PC monitor is typically fine, but some TVs are certainly better then others. I personally use an LG OLED (B6P) as my monitor, and don't have any issues. That being said, some TVs are horrible PC monitors. Check reviews before purchase (Rtings.com does an excellent job at this).

The one thing to remember: HDMI 2.0 can't handle 4k HDR 4:4:4 @ 60 Hz; it simply doesn't have the bandwidth. So for HDR content you'd need to drop to 4:2:2 [most games do this automatically anyways]. Also note most TVs don't support any form of Variable Refresh Rate. Both these issues are being addressed as part of HDMI 2.1, so if you are on the fence you can try and wait for that to start appearing in products.
Thank you for the answer. Rtings is my favorite website that comes to 4k tvs.

You wrote that: "HDMI 2.0 can't handle 4k HDR 4:4:4 @ 60 Hz"

So,

What is the difference between 4k HDR 4:4:4 @ 60 hz and 4:2:2?
Can you notice/see that somehow when playing games?
 
Thank you for the answer. Rtings is my favorite website that comes to 4k tvs.

You wrote that: "HDMI 2.0 can't handle 4k HDR 4:4:4 @ 60 Hz"

So,

What is the difference between 4k HDR 4:4:4 @ 60 hz and 4:2:2?
Can you notice/see that somehow when playing games?
Once again, Rtings explains things better then I can:

https://www.rtings.com/tv/learn/chroma-subsampling

At 720p, 4:2:2 would be objectively bad compared to 4:4:4. But at 4k the loss of visual quality isn't readily noticeable.

Also remember the bandwidth limitation only applies to 4k HDR; all other modes have enough bandwidth for HDMI 2.0 to support 4:4:4. So if you set your Desktop to non-HDR, you can set 4:4:4 and be happy. [I believe HDR titles automatically drop to 4:2:2 anyways].

And again, the very first HDMI 2.1 TVs are starting to hit the market, making this restriction moot (once GPUs support it; probably the next batch will).
 
Reactions: gemart
Jan 18, 2019
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Once again, Rtings explains things better then I can:

https://www.rtings.com/tv/learn/chroma-subsampling

At 720p, 4:2:2 would be objectively bad compared to 4:4:4. But at 4k the loss of visual quality isn't readily noticeable.

Also remember the bandwidth limitation only applies to 4k HDR; all other modes have enough bandwidth for HDMI 2.0 to support 4:4:4. So if you set your Desktop to non-HDR, you can set 4:4:4 and be happy. [I believe HDR titles automatically drop to 4:2:2 anyways].

And again, the very first HDMI 2.1 TVs are starting to hit the market, making this restriction moot (once GPUs support it; probably the next batch will).
thanks for the reply. Do you mean that I should not buy rtx 2080 ti now and wait for the next generation?
 
thanks for the reply. Do you mean that I should not buy rtx 2080 ti now and wait for the next generation?
It depends. HDMI 2.1 doesn't benefit if not connected to a HDMI 2.1 display, so if you have a TV that you aren't planning on upgrading anytime soon, then you may as well get a 2080 ti. If you get a HDMI 2.1 capable TV however, then you may as well wait until a GPU that supports it. [Don't forget you'll need to upgrade to 2.1 capable cables].
 
Reactions: gemart
Jan 18, 2019
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It depends. HDMI 2.1 doesn't benefit if not connected to a HDMI 2.1 display, so if you have a TV that you aren't planning on upgrading anytime soon, then you may as well get a 2080 ti. If you get a HDMI 2.1 capable TV however, then you may as well wait until a GPU that supports it. [Don't forget you'll need to upgrade to 2.1 capable cables].
Thanks for the information!
 

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