Build Advice $500 Workstation Build

Apr 10, 2019
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Hey everyone, i need some help with build for working purposes. Got some weak laptop for now that slows me down in my working process.

Here is info:

Approximate Purchase Date:
In a few months, can wait up to autumn.
Budget Range: $500
System Usage from Most to Least Important: Photo Editing/Drawing (Photoshop/Illustrator) + some Adobe Premiere work.
Are you buying a monitor: No
Do you need to buy OS: No
Preferred Website(s) for Parts: -
Location:
Russia
Parts Preferences: -
Overclocking:
Maybe if needed
SLI or Crossfire: No
Your Monitor Resolution: 1920x1080

Additional Comments: I dont mind using integrated GPU if it will work for my needs. Just want fast workflow with snappy response from my PC.
Usual load on my PC is: Photoshop + Chrome with ~10 tabs + Illustrator + some office apps.

Thank you for your time!
 

punkncat

Commendable
Apr 3, 2018
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With the wildcard being prices in Russia...based on that I know in this market this looks like a job for the Ryzen 5 integrated graphics solution. With the time frame you are looking at the 3000 series may be out and give more powerful options.
 
Jan 14, 2019
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Some of the cheapest microprocessors include the AMD Ryzen 3 2200G (4 cores, 4 threads) and a few microprocessors from the AMD Athlon series. However, I feel that most microprocessors from the AMD Athlon series may not be worth it because they often have 2 cores and 4 threads. Going on a small budget? AMD Ryzen 5 microprocessors with 6 cores and 12 threads (e.g. AMD Ryzen 5 2600, AMD Ryzen 5 2600X, AMD Ryzen 5 2600E, AMD Ryzen 5 1600) or AMD Ryzen 7 with 8 cores and 16 threads (e.g. AMD Ryzen 7 2700, AMD Ryzen 7 1800X, AMD Ryzen 7 1700) are good options to choose from and are often cheaper than Intel Core i5 microprocessors. It is possible to overclock AMD microprocessors with some software. The Intel Core i7-8700, Intel Core i7-8700K, and Intel Core i9-9900K are also good options if budget is not a big concern. The AMD Ryzen Threadripper microprocessors and Intel Core X-series microprocessors are also good options but they are overpriced. 3rd generation AMD Ryzen (AMD Ryzen 3000 series) and new Intel microprocessors are going to appear soon later this year. Some older Intel Core i7 microprocessors with Hyper-Threading Technology will be a good option but that also means finding older compatible motherboards and other older compatible parts.

For the internal storage device, a SSD (solid-state drive) will be good because it is one of the fastest types available. I will also recommend a SSHD (solid-state hybrid drive) which combines the high speed of an SSD with the massive amount of memory found on a HDD (hard disk drive).

8 GB to 32 GB of DDR4 RAM would be good.

For the motherboard, try to get a micro-ATX motherboard or bigger because they have more expansion slots and more space to work with.

I guess a 300 W to 450 W power supply unit (PSU) would be enough since no graphics card is needed. Good brands of PSUs include Corsair (CX series, RMi series, RMx series, HX series), Thermaltake (Toughpower series), Cooler Master (MasterWatt Lite series), EVGA, and Seasonic (Focus series).
 
Apr 10, 2019
12
0
10
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With the wildcard being prices in Russia...based on that I know in this market this looks like a job for the Ryzen 5 integrated graphics solution. With the time frame you are looking at the 3000 series may be out and give more powerful options.
Thanks, i was thinking about Ryzen too, which one will be better AMD Ryzen 3 2200G or AMD Ryzen 5 2400G ? Maybe its worth to buy cheaper one and wait for a new 3000 series?

Some of the cheapest microprocessors include the AMD Ryzen 3 2200G (4 cores, 4 threads) and a few microprocessors from the AMD Athlon series. However, I feel that most microprocessors from the AMD Athlon series may not be worth it because they often have 2 cores and 4 threads. Going on a small budget? AMD Ryzen 5 microprocessors with 6 cores and 12 threads (e.g. AMD Ryzen 5 2600, AMD Ryzen 5 2600X, AMD Ryzen 5 2600E, AMD Ryzen 5 1600) or AMD Ryzen 7 with 8 cores and 16 threads (e.g. AMD Ryzen 7 2700, AMD Ryzen 7 1800X, AMD Ryzen 7 1700) are good options to choose from and are often cheaper than Intel Core i5 microprocessors. It is possible to overclock AMD microprocessors with some software. The Intel Core i7-8700, Intel Core i7-8700K, and Intel Core i9-9900K are also good options if budget is not a big concern. The AMD Ryzen Threadripper microprocessors and Intel Core X-series microprocessors are also good options but they are overpriced. 3rd generation AMD Ryzen (AMD Ryzen 3000 series) and new Intel microprocessors are going to appear soon later this year. Some older Intel Core i7 microprocessors with Hyper-Threading Technology will be a good option but that also means finding older compatible motherboards and other older compatible parts.

For the internal storage device, a SSD (solid-state drive) will be good because it is one of the fastest types available. I will also recommend a SSHD (solid-state hybrid drive) which combines the high speed of an SSD with the massive amount of memory found on a HDD (hard disk drive).

8 GB to 32 GB of DDR4 RAM would be good.

For the motherboard, try to get a micro-ATX motherboard or bigger because they have more expansion slots and more space to work with.

I guess a 300 W to 450 W power supply unit (PSU) would be enough since no graphics card is needed. Good brands of PSUs include Corsair (CX series, RMi series, RMx series, HX series), Thermaltake (Toughpower series), Cooler Master (MasterWatt Lite series), EVGA, and Seasonic (Focus series).
Thanks man for such detailed review, what can you say about i5 8400 Is it worth the price? Also which integrated GPU would be better Intel UHD or Vega?
Sad thing about Ryzen that there are only few one with Vega graphics as far as i know.
 

g-unit1111

Titan
Moderator
Some of the cheapest microprocessors include the AMD Ryzen 3 2200G (4 cores, 4 threads) and a few microprocessors from the AMD Athlon series. However, I feel that most microprocessors from the AMD Athlon series may not be worth it because they often have 2 cores and 4 threads. Going on a small budget? AMD Ryzen 5 microprocessors with 6 cores and 12 threads (e.g. AMD Ryzen 5 2600, AMD Ryzen 5 2600X, AMD Ryzen 5 2600E, AMD Ryzen 5 1600) or AMD Ryzen 7 with 8 cores and 16 threads (e.g. AMD Ryzen 7 2700, AMD Ryzen 7 1800X, AMD Ryzen 7 1700) are good options to choose from and are often cheaper than Intel Core i5 microprocessors. It is possible to overclock AMD microprocessors with some software.
You don't overclock CPUs with "some software", it is done through the motherboard's BIOS and that is it. You can also overclock Intel CPUs through the BIOS if they are supported. How many cores you need in a CPU entirely depends on what you want it to do. If the purpose of the machine is just for basic web browsing and things like running Office 365, then yeah you actually don't really need anything more than a Pentium G or an Athlon. A Ryzen 5 / 7 would be overkill for those purposes. The best budget processor right now is the R5-2600 which you can get around the $150 mark.

The AMD Ryzen Threadripper microprocessors and Intel Core X-series microprocessors are also good options but they are overpriced. 3rd generation AMD Ryzen (AMD Ryzen 3000 series) and new Intel microprocessors are going to appear soon later this year. Some older Intel Core i7 microprocessors with Hyper-Threading Technology will be a good option but that also means finding older compatible motherboards and other older compatible parts.
For basic video editing you don't need a Threadripper or Core X. You could go the older system route but maintaining and upgrading these systems can be a bit of a pain.

For the internal storage device, a SSD (solid-state drive) will be good because it is one of the fastest types available. I will also recommend a SSHD (solid-state hybrid drive) which combines the high speed of an SSD with the massive amount of memory found on a HDD (hard disk drive).
Hybrid drives are old tech these days. It's more about SSDs and M2 drives. I'd personally recommend the latter if you can afford it, it's a far better investment than a hybrid drive at this point.

I guess a 300 W to 450 W power supply unit (PSU) would be enough since no graphics card is needed. Good brands of PSUs include Corsair (CX series, RMi series, RMx series, HX series), Thermaltake (Toughpower series), Cooler Master (MasterWatt Lite series), EVGA, and Seasonic (Focus series).
If you're using any form of Ryzen CPU, you will HAVE to have a GPU because there's no onboard video. Even the Ryzen 3s don't have it. A 2200/2400G would be a better fit since it does have onboard video. You could get away with it if you're using a Pentium or i3 since they do have onboard video. Some of those are decent units, but avoid the CM power supplies.
 
Apr 10, 2019
12
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You don't overclock CPUs with "some software", it is done through the motherboard's BIOS and that is it. You can also overclock Intel CPUs through the BIOS if they are supported. How many cores you need in a CPU entirely depends on what you want it to do. If the purpose of the machine is just for basic web browsing and things like running Office 365, then yeah you actually don't really need anything more than a Pentium G or an Athlon. A Ryzen 5 / 7 would be overkill for those purposes. The best budget processor right now is the R5-2600 which you can get around the $150 mark.



For basic video editing you don't need a Threadripper or Core X. You could go the older system route but maintaining and upgrading these systems can be a bit of a pain.



Hybrid drives are old tech these days. It's more about SSDs and M2 drives. I'd personally recommend the latter if you can afford it, it's a far better investment than a hybrid drive at this point.



If you're using any form of Ryzen CPU, you will HAVE to have a GPU because there's no onboard video. Even the Ryzen 3s don't have it. A 2200/2400G would be a better fit since it does have onboard video. You could get away with it if you're using a Pentium or i3 since they do have onboard video. Some of those are decent units, but avoid the CM power supplies.
Thanks for clarification sir, I"m leaning towards Ryzen 2400G.
 

WildCard999

Titan
Herald
If your not building for a few months/autumn and with Ryzen 3rd gen coming out in a few months I'd keep an eye out for that as it appears (rumors) that there coming out with the 3300G which might be a 6C/12T CPU with a Navi iGPU.
 
Apr 10, 2019
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If your not building for a few months/autumn and with Ryzen 3rd gen coming out in a few months I'd keep an eye out for that as it appears (rumors) that there coming out with the 3300G which might be a 6C/12T CPU with a Navi iGPU.
Yeah, thought the same, i will be waiting for june atleast for some possible discounts on the 2xxx CPUs haha. Thank you for the info!
 
Jan 14, 2019
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Thank you g-unit1111 and everybody else who contributed to this discussion for the additional information. By the way, the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1650 graphics card is already out. Most GTX 1650 models do not need a 6-pin PCIE power connector from a power supply unit. The means that you may fix this graphics card (mostly models with 1 fan) into a computer whose power supply unit has no 6-pin connector. However, the GTX 1650 is overpriced according to many people's opinions so if you can get maybe an AMD Radeon RX 570 or for less than the approximately USD 149.99 price of the GTX 1650 then you may get it instead. The reason why I am saying this is because a discrete graphics card will not only help you to do gaming but also do video editing and other demanding tasks.
 

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