Question 500W ATX PSU popped along with a flash of sparks, question concerning other pc components

xray559

Commendable
Jan 2, 2020
65
1
1,535
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Hi, recently, my PSU popped/gave out and caused a quick flash of sparks in my PC during a gaming session. I took out my PSU, instantly feeling how hot it was, smelt a robust burning odor coming from it, and opened it up to check if there were any burnt parts. I can say that the PSU was abnormally hot, but I didn't see any burning on the inside. Nevertheless, my PSU would not turn on inside my pc, which gave the issue away. I'm considering replacing it with a 550W PSU or higher, learning that my GPU requires a minimum of 550W. What worries me the most is the large spark of electricity that I saw from the corner of my eye inside the pc. The spark was somewhere in between the PSU and GPU. My main concern is regarding other components in my pc. Could a PSU that seemingly "popped," for lack of a better term, cause other components in the PC to break? Thank you.


PSU: Cybertron 500w ATX power supply
Used for about three years

Specs:
Computer: MSI MS-7B07
CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 2600 (Pinnacle Ridge, PiR-B2)
3400 MHz (34.00x100.0) @ 3773 MHz (37.75x100.0)
Motherboard: MSI A320M PRO-VH PLUS (MS-7B07)
BIOS: 3.I2, 05/10/2022
Chipset: AMD A320 (Promontory)
Memory: 32768 MBytes @ 1599 MHz, 16-20-20-38
  • 16384 MB PC25600 DDR4 SDRAM - Corsair CMK32GX4M2E3200C16
  • 16384 MB PC25600 DDR4 SDRAM - Corsair CMK32GX4M2E3200C16
Graphics: NVIDIA, Device ID: 2504 [PNY Technologies]
, 0 MB (RTX 3060)
Drive: ADATA SU655, 117.2 GB, Serial ATA 6Gb/s @ 6Gb/s
Drive: TOSHIBA HDWD110, 976.8 GB, Serial ATA 6Gb/s @ 6Gb/s
Drive: ADATA SU800, 500.1 GB, Serial ATA 6Gb/s @ 6Gb/s
Drive: Samsung SSD 870 EVO 1TB, 976.8 GB, Serial ATA 6Gb/s @ 6Gb/s
 
Last edited:
Hi, recently, my PSU popped/gave out and caused a quick flash of sparks in my PC during a gaming session. I took out my PSU, instantly feeling how hot it was, smelt a robust burning odor coming from it, and opened it up to check if there were any burnt parts. I can say that the PSU was abnormally hot, but I didn't see any burning on the inside. Nevertheless, my PSU would not turn on inside my pc, which gave the issue away. I'm considering replacing it with a 550W PSU or higher, learning that my GPU requires a minimum of 550W. What worries me the most is the large spark of electricity that I saw from the corner of my eye inside the pc. The spark was somewhere in between the PSU and GPU. My main concern is regarding other components in my pc. Could a PSU that seemingly "popped," for lack of a better term, cause other components in the PC to break? Thank you.


PSU: Cybertron 500w ATX power supply
Used for about three years

Specs:
Computer: MSI MS-7B07
CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 2600 (Pinnacle Ridge, PiR-B2)
3400 MHz (34.00x100.0) @ 3773 MHz (37.75x100.0)
Motherboard: MSI A320M PRO-VH PLUS (MS-7B07)
BIOS: 3.I2, 05/10/2022
Chipset: AMD A320 (Promontory)
Memory: 32768 MBytes @ 1599 MHz, 16-20-20-38
  • 16384 MB PC25600 DDR4 SDRAM - Corsair CMK32GX4M2E3200C16
  • 16384 MB PC25600 DDR4 SDRAM - Corsair CMK32GX4M2E3200C16
Graphics: NVIDIA, Device ID: 2504 [PNY Technologies]
, 0 MB (RTX 3060)
Drive: ADATA SU655, 117.2 GB, Serial ATA 6Gb/s @ 6Gb/s
Drive: TOSHIBA HDWD110, 976.8 GB, Serial ATA 6Gb/s @ 6Gb/s
Drive: ADATA SU800, 500.1 GB, Serial ATA 6Gb/s @ 6Gb/s
Drive: Samsung SSD 870 EVO 1TB, 976.8 GB, Serial ATA 6Gb/s @ 6Gb/s
The spark that you are discribing could have shorted the whole system. That being said it is most likely now a fully fried system the best way to test would use a secondary psu that's of no concern and make sure the system still post if it does you maybe lucky and just need a new psu. However again just because it boots doesn't mean it didn't weaken other parts so it may work but not at full potential. Or it could boot no issues with a new psu
 
Reactions: ohio_buckeye
The only way to know is to try it. The good thing is gpu prices have come down quite a bit. If all works good, you might consider swapping that 2600 for a 5600 or better as that would probably give a nice boost to performance (as long as your bios will update to handle the new cpu).

In any event, if you have an old power supply to test with, plug it in and if it boots, turn it off and get a quality psu. In my system for example I run a Corsair rmx 850 watt power supply. It was a bit pricey at the time but now I don’t have to worry about my system shutting down etc. When power supplies go like yours did they can unfortunately take your entire pc out.
 

DSzymborski

Titan
Moderator
Yeah, that PSU is frightening; this PC should never have been turned on with a real GPU in there. Whether other things work or not can only be determined with testing. When a competently made PSU fails, other things shouldn't go with it, but the risk goes up tremendously when a junk PSU is used.
 
Reactions: Ralston18

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
More testing is indeed necessary.

I suggest, before proceeding, that you ensure that all important data on those drives is backed up and proven recoverable.

At least disconnect and remove the drives. Check the drives, one at a time, by installing or connecting the drive to another known working computer.

Direct install, adapter, or maybe some enclosure.

Objective being to prevent the drives from potential damage - hopefully it is not already too late for that.....
 
Reactions: white.a.drew

xray559

Commendable
Jan 2, 2020
65
1
1,535
0
More testing is indeed necessary.

I suggest, before proceeding, that you ensure that all important data on those drives is backed up and proven recoverable.

At least disconnect and remove the drives. Check the drives, one at a time, by installing or connecting the drive to another known working computer.

Direct install, adapter, or maybe some enclosure.

Objective being to prevent the drives from potential damage - hopefully it is not already too late for that.....
Hello, thanks, everyone, for the responses. I took out my external SSDs that were connected directly to the mobo and PSU. I plugged them into my laptop, error-checked, and all looked okay with them. Could the non-faulty states of my drives mean that other parts may not be damaged?

Also, I don't have another PSU, so I am currently ordering a new one for replacement and testing.
 
Hello, thanks, everyone, for the responses. I took out my external SSDs that were connected directly to the mobo and PSU. I plugged them into my laptop, error-checked, and all looked okay with them. Could the non-faulty states of my drives mean that other parts may not be damaged?

Also, I don't have another PSU, so I am currently ordering a new one for replacement and testing.
The drives maybe fine but that doesn't mean the whole system is still good. It maybe fine but there's no way for any of to be able to tell you that part.
 
Reactions: ohio_buckeye
You say you opened your PSU and looked for burn damage; did you take a flashlight and visually examine your mobo for any burn marks, burst caps, major discoloration. Also, if doing that, unplug the CPU and main mobo connections and check for any burning in the connections (had that happen to one of my boards when a psu died-was the only indicator of the problem).
I'm always a proponent of quality power supplies (see list at the start of this forum), and believe in having more power available then recommended: I would recommend a minimum of 650 (preferably 750) watts.
 
Reactions: white.a.drew

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