Question 5800x vs 10850k Long Term

BlackLavender

Honorable
Feb 17, 2016
4
0
10,510
0
Hello, Im quite new to this forum, so please bear with me if I don't fit the culture lol

I'm currently considering Ryzen 7 5800x (360 USD) vs Intel 10850k (300 USD). I want a powerful snappy system, especially since I don't plan on upgrading for a very long time. (My current system is a 4c/8t franken pc from 2014 with a 1060 6gb added later. My question is which is the better buy for VERY long term success 6-8 years. I lightly multitask, occasionally running UE4, Blender & Photoshop, my primary use case however, is gaming @ 1080p 60hz. Ryzen currently looks appealing to me due to pcie4.0, and the future of Direct Storage. However, 60USD cheaper and 2c/4t extra is very hard to deny. Please offer your experiences with either or both so I can help make a informed, quality decision.

Edit: I also plan on using my 1060 until the GPU market chills out, I plan on upgrading to a 3070 or maybe better around a year from now.
 

BlackLavender

Honorable
Feb 17, 2016
4
0
10,510
0
There's already a lot of reviews comparing Ryzen 4th gen and Intel's 10th gen and 11th gen products. It would probably do you good to go watch a few as there's not much point in re-hashing their results here.

HWunboxed:
https://www.youtube.com/c/Hardwareunboxednow/search?query=5800x review

GamersNexus:
https://www.youtube.com/c/GamersNexus/search?query=5800x review
Thanks for the great resources, but i dont feel that these address the specific price points that I'm dealing with due to Microcenter having crazy good deals. Also I'm looking for general opinions on the long-term survivability of both. CPUs
 
Hello, Im quite new to this forum, so please bear with me if I don't fit the culture lol

I'm currently considering Ryzen 7 5800x (360 USD) vs Intel 10850k (300 USD). I want a powerful snappy system, especially since I don't plan on upgrading for a very long time. (My current system is a 4c/8t franken pc from 2014 with a 1060 6gb added later. My question is which is the better buy for VERY long term success 6-8 years. I lightly multitask, occasionally running UE4, Blender & Photoshop, my primary use case however, is gaming @ 1080p 60hz. Ryzen currently looks appealing to me due to pcie4.0, and the future of Direct Storage. However, 60USD cheaper and 2c/4t extra is very hard to deny. Please offer your experiences with either or both so I can help make a informed, quality decision.

Edit: I also plan on using my 1060 until the GPU market chills out, I plan on upgrading to a 3070 or maybe better around a year from now.
They are both a bit overkill for 60Hz gaming.
 
Reactions: drea.drechsler

Zerk2012

Titan
Ambassador
Thanks for the great resources, but i dont feel that these address the specific price points that I'm dealing with due to Microcenter having crazy good deals. Also I'm looking for general opinions on the long-term survivability of both. CPUs
The 60 bucks less will be made up by not having to buy a expensive motherboard and cooler if you go AMD.
For what to get it's up to you either would be a good choice.

EDIT for long term nobody really knows tech changes so fast.
 
Thanks for the great resources, but i dont feel that these address the specific price points that I'm dealing with due to Microcenter having crazy good deals. Also I'm looking for general opinions on the long-term survivability of both. CPUs
What do you mean by "long term survivability"? If anything ever was X86 architecture is as deeply written in stone as any modern technology can be so they're going to be around a long time, and well supported in both Windows and Linux OS's.

If you mean "future proofed"...that's a false God to worship if ever there was one. Neither are going to be at the top of the performance pile for long as both architectures have their replacements well on the way. Zen 5th gen (the successor to Ryzen 5000) is coming out on an all-new socket so there will be no upgrading into any current motherboard, but then while I can't be sure I'd have to assume Intel's new arch will too as they are both looking at DDR5 memory support.

And I do agree: 5800X isn't a great value proposition, and especially poor if gaming is the only consideration. For gaming-only a 5600X is the best value, for mixed gaming and productivity/creativity work a 5900X is the value choice. If productivity/creativity is a preeminent consideration then 5950X is the true and undisputed king of desktop CPU's right now.
 
Last edited:

mikewinddale

Reputable
Dec 22, 2016
274
29
4,840
24
The Ryzen has PCIe 4.0, so I say go with that for future-proofing.

Gaming doesn't require a ton of cores. So sure, 2 extra cores are nice, but I think PCIe 4.0 is more important if you want maximum performance with future graphics cards and SSDs.

I'll add that the Ryzen supports ECC, as long as the motherboard does - and many boards do. Check the technical specifications tab on the manufacturer's page and see if it mentions ECC. If you want your system to last a long time, then ECC means you have one less component to worry about. ECC is slightly slower - about 2% - but I think it's worth the extra reliability. Kingston makes DDR4-3200 ECC UDIMM.
 
If you don’t want to upgrade for a few years, buy the most powerful cpu you can afford. Why do you think all these years later guys are still running i7 4770 or i7 6700 chips? They were some of the best at the time.

https://www.reddit.com/r/pcmasterrace/comments/jbk5vb View: https://www.reddit.com/r/pcmasterrace/comments/jbk5vb/i9_10850k_vs_ryzen_7_5800x/


Bit of a discussion there. Seems like in some things today the ryzen is better, but in a few years will extra cores on the i9 be beneficial? Either setup will probably be great. In 3-4 years you’ll probably be thinking of upgrading anyway.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY