Question 5900X Cooling

Sep 17, 2021
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Hello I am trying to reduce the fan noise on my AIO
Fractal Design Celsius S36 - 360 mm Radiator - Silent Liquid CPU Cooler - PWM - Intelligent Controls - 3x Fractal Design Dynamic X2 PWM GP-12 120Mm Silent Fans,the 5900x is not overclocked, I was wondering if replacing the 3 stock fans on the radiator for Noctua NF-A12X25 fans would make a big improvement in lower temps and noise as MSFS2020 pushes the CPU temps above 70 degrees and produces noticeable noise.
Also I was wondering if it would be better to swap out the radiator all together and go with a D15, my only concern is becauseI have a rtx3080 msi suprimx is so heavy already i dont really want to add more weight into the system.
Thanks in advance.
 

Phaaze88

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For noise, you should've settled for a 140mm class air cooler, or 280mm AIO, as well as 140mm chassis fans - 200mm, if your chassis supports it.
Coolers that use 140mm fans offer the best balance of performance to noise.

For now, go into bios and set a custom fan curve that runs the fans as high as you can comfortably tolerate.
The same works for the 3080 with Afterburner.

You won't see a big improvement in thermals due to the combination of:
-Ryzen 5000's very aggressive turbo boost; the cpu will still seek higher clock speeds, even at 85C. This is by design, and your comfort zone will only conflict with that.
-The higher thermal density of the 7nm dies beneath the IHS.
-The 3080 Suprim X dumping its waste heat into the chassis.

i dont really want to add more weight into the system.
It's a misconception that was debunked years ago. The mounting hardware on modern air coolers allows it to share its load with the motherboard, which shares the load with the chassis, thanks to the standoffs.
Better support than what that big ol' gpu has.
 
Sep 17, 2021
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thank you for your reply, do you think i would benifit from changing from a 360 radiator with 120mm fans on it to a 420 with 140mm .
My case id a define 7 so no problem with the size.
its got 2 140mm fans at the front with space for another.
 

Phaaze88

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Not unless you really feel like spending at least 130USD for one of those 420mm coolers...
You won't really solve the temperatures that way, because the source of the problem with this cpu lies under the IHS.
"It's well known that the 5800x has heat issues, because its got the same TDP as the 12 core 5900x, but half the actual die space to dissipate that heat.
This means no matter how big a cooler you slap onto these chips, they just overheat and run close to 80C as the solder AMD used just cant get the heat out fast enough."
^This also means that some of the heat gets lost in the socket, instead of going up through the heatspreader > thermal paste > cpu cooler cold plate, to get properly cycled out.
The 5800X doesn't pull that much power at all, yet it's got people putting in coolers suited for 11700Ks and HEDT chips to try and brute force the temperatures down...
 
Sep 17, 2021
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Hi Phaaze88 my cpu is a 5900x, I have checked and my case wont take a 420mm so I would need to swap out the case, I have read good reviews on the Artic freezer 420mm AIO and if there is a big difference between The Fractal S360 AIO and the Artic 420 then I dont have a problem with the cost.
 

Phaaze88

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Gamers' Nexus has reviewed the LF II 420:
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xCxqITPtXXA

The noise normalized thermals starting at 12:56 is likely closer to what you'd run the fans at - at least, compared to 100%, but there's still other factors, like fan pitch and sound profile.
For example: Noctua's NF-F12(22.4dBA) have a lower noise rating than their A14(24.6dBA). But I can comfortably run a set of A14s in my chassis at 100%.
I can't do it with the F12s; they are pretty annoying at high rpms. I have to turn 'em down to 70-75% before I'm comfortable with them.
So there's more to it than noise level - there's also your own ears, but that can't be universally measured. Even then, I'd suggest going with larger fans most of the time, as they generally move more air at the same rpm and have a more pleasant sound profile while doing so.

In the video, there's not a significant difference between them.
Also, those numbers are deltaT over ambient, and not the actual temperature. Since the recorded ambient was 21C, you add those on top of that.


Is there an unmentioned ram clearance problem? I'd understand, as the LF IIs are a bit thicker than the norm(38mm Vs 27-30mm).
 
Sep 17, 2021
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Gamers' Nexus has reviewed the LF II 420:
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xCxqITPtXXA

The noise normalized thermals starting at 12:56 is likely closer to what you'd run the fans at - at least, compared to 100%, but there's still other factors, like fan pitch and sound profile.
For example: Noctua's NF-F12(22.4dBA) have a lower noise rating than their A14(24.6dBA). But I can comfortably run a set of A14s in my chassis at 100%.
I can't do it with the F12s; they are pretty annoying at high rpms. I have to turn 'em down to 70-75% before I'm comfortable with them.
So there's more to it than noise level - there's also your own ears, but that can't be universally measured. Even then, I'd suggest going with larger fans most of the time, as they generally move more air at the same rpm and have a more pleasant sound profile while doing so.

In the video, there's not a significant difference between them.
Also, those numbers are deltaT over ambient, and not the actual temperature. Since the recorded ambient was 21C, you add those on top of that.


Is there an unmentioned ram clearance problem? I'd understand, as the LF IIs are a bit thicker than the norm(38mm Vs 27-30mm).
Yes I have seen in a few forums the AF 420 wont fit , ram or io shield
 

Phaaze88

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Roger that. Then it's either:
A)Work with what you got - run the fans as high as you can comfortably tolerate.

B)Look at 280mm units instead. AIOs are largely the same. It's generally the fans and some cosmetics that set them apart.
OH, and some models move the pump around[trying to get around Asetek's patent]. This can affect your mounting options.
Take Msi's MAG Coreliquid Rs for example. The pump is in the radiator - do not mount it at the top. The Coreliquid Ks are Asetek's, but they're stupid expensive for some reason...
Then there's be quiet's Pure Loop as another example, which has it in a little cylinder on the tubing itself. Since it's in the middle of the loop regardless, it shouldn't matter how you mount the rad.

C)Look at 140mm class air coolers. Not far behind a 280mm AIO, but are more affordable and the sound profile is just as good.
A good option for a backup cooler to an AIO.
 

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