Question 5900x Cooling

fpga123

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I am rebuilding my PC from a Skylake to my first AMD build with 5900x slowly due to rising prices. But the temps are beyond normal and hitting the ceiling with load. I have built systems all my life but this is a first encountering a processor which actively tries to reach the ceiling.

Specs:
AMD Ryzen 9 5900x
Gigabyte Aorus x570
Zotac 1060

Cooling:
XPG Levant 240mm AIO in exhaust configuration top side
ASUS TUF GT501 Casing in stock configuration of 3x120mm intakes in front and 1x140mm exhaust at the back
Thermal Grizzly Conductonaut

Temps:
Room: 28 C
Package: 55-65 browsing/media, 75-86 gaming, 90+ with compression etc
GPU: 40-45 idle, 50-65 gaming

I will be buying a 3070 Ti in the coming months. I am considering buying better fans and perhaps changing the AIO with a 360mm one. Noise isn't something I care about.

Market is very limited here so we have select companies with limited selection available. Currently I can pick up Lian Li SL/AL Uni Fans and their Galahad SL 360mm AIO. There are also some Cooler Master AIOs available but for some reason there are no fans available from them.

Please give advice on what I can do?
 

Phaaze88

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AMD designed Ryzen 5000 with a more aggressive boost algorithm that the previous gens:
That's why you see that behavior.

Please give advice on what I can do?
A number of things you can try before jumping on a purchase:
1)Remove that rear exhaust fan. Now there's 2 sources of room air to feed through the cooler.
2)Remove the top panel's filter. It's really there for when you're not using the PC, to keep out dust that falls from above.
3)Move the AIO to front intake. Position the fans behind the radiator to pull air inside. The 3 front fans, move to the top as exhaust.

4)That's not Kryonaut, but Conductonaut?
Did you 'paint' it on the cooler block, and over the entire cpu IHS?
Did the package come with a validation certificate?
Hmm, maybe I should've made this as number 1 instead...
 
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fpga123

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AMD designed Ryzen 5000 with a more aggressive boost algorithm that the previous gens:
That's why you see that behavior.


A number of things you can try before jumping on a purchase:
1)Remove that rear exhaust fan. Now there's 2 sources of room air to feed through the cooler.
2)Remove the top panel's filter. It's really there for when you're not using the PC, to keep out dust that falls from above.
3)Move the AIO to front intake. Position the fans behind the radiator to pull air inside. The 3 front fans, move to the top as exhaust.

4)That's not Kryonaut, but Conductonaut?
Did you 'paint' it on the cooler block, and over the entire cpu IHS?
Did the package come with a validation certificate?
Hmm, maybe I should've made this as number 1 instead...
I'll try the configurations. As for Conductonaut, yes I had painted it over both completely and it did come with a validation certificate.
 

fpga123

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AMD designed Ryzen 5000 with a more aggressive boost algorithm that the previous gens:
That's why you see that behavior.


A number of things you can try before jumping on a purchase:
1)Remove that rear exhaust fan. Now there's 2 sources of room air to feed through the cooler.
2)Remove the top panel's filter. It's really there for when you're not using the PC, to keep out dust that falls from above.
3)Move the AIO to front intake. Position the fans behind the radiator to pull air inside. The 3 front fans, move to the top as exhaust.

4)That's not Kryonaut, but Conductonaut?
Did you 'paint' it on the cooler block, and over the entire cpu IHS?
Did the package come with a validation certificate?
Hmm, maybe I should've made this as number 1 instead...
Well the configs didn't do anything positive. The first and second didn't make any difference, the third I couldn't do as the front was too far away and tubes were short. As these have failed. I guess I ought to look forward for the purchase next month.

Should I buy the fans first and only after consider the AIO?
I have seen in reviews that the 360mm AIO doesn't really make much of a difference over a 240mm one, is that true in your experience?
 
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Should I buy the fans first and only after consider the AIO?
I have seen in reviews that the 360mm AIO doesn't really make much of a difference over a 240mm one, is that true in your experience?
that depends on aio used , different aio, different performance...same rule as with air coolers

as far as radiator size goes, generally 240mm aio is weaker than best aircooler (noctua nh-d15), 280mm aio is on pair with nh-d15, 360mm aio beats nh-d15 by a bit (not by much tbh)
https://www.techradar.com/reviews/amd-ryzen-9-5900x
hjere in this review they had 360mm aio and got 86C
 
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fpga123

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that depends on aio used , different aio, different performance...same rule as with air coolers

as far as radiator size goes, generally 240mm aio is weaker than best aircooler (noctua nh-d15), 280mm aio is on pair with nh-d15, 360mm aio beats nh-d15 by a bit (not by much tbh)
https://www.techradar.com/reviews/amd-ryzen-9-5900x
hjere in this review they had 360mm aio and got 86C
Air coolers are currently in short supply and top out at ~$50, while AIOs are abundant in the market where I live. In the cooler market, only Cooler Master, Lian Li and XPG are easily sourced.
 

Phaaze88

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Well the configs didn't do anything positive. The first and second didn't make any difference, the third I couldn't do as the front was too far away and tubes were short. As these have failed. I guess I ought to look forward for the purchase next month.
They did nothing? Ok. What if you:
Grab a desk or table fan, remove the chassis side panel, and aim the fan inside the PC.
Run the fan on high and check load temperatures again.

If that hardly changes, that's your liquid metal application, not the AIO.
 
Air coolers are currently in short supply and top out at ~$50, while AIOs are abundant in the market where I live. In the cooler market, only Cooler Master, Lian Li and XPG are easily sourced.
A few more things to try: it's really sad your tubing won't allow you to mount the radiator on the front panel. Have you considered putting the fans between the panel and the radiator? that might give you a little more room to reach. Front mount is probably one of the best for a radiator since it uses cool outside air for the CPU.

You might also try undervolting the CPU with curve optimizer, it can help with temperatures although it mostly helps improve performance at similar temperatures. The improved performance will let you set a platform thermal limit to around 85C so it never goes above that set point and performance will most likely remain the same.

Also, keep in mind Ryzen 5000 is designed to run up to 90C. AMD has told us that it uses it keep pushing performance up to 90C so long as it's not power or current limited.
 

JeffreyP55

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I am rebuilding my PC from a Skylake to my first AMD build with 5900x slowly due to rising prices. But the temps are beyond normal and hitting the ceiling with load. I have built systems all my life but this is a first encountering a processor which actively tries to reach the ceiling.

Specs:
AMD Ryzen 9 5900x
Gigabyte Aorus x570
Zotac 1060

Cooling:
XPG Levant 240mm AIO in exhaust configuration top side
ASUS TUF GT501 Casing in stock configuration of 3x120mm intakes in front and 1x140mm exhaust at the back
Thermal Grizzly Conductonaut

Temps:
Room: 28 C
Package: 55-65 browsing/media, 75-86 gaming, 90+ with compression etc
GPU: 40-45 idle, 50-65 gaming

I will be buying a 3070 Ti in the coming months. I am considering buying better fans and perhaps changing the AIO with a 360mm one. Noise isn't something I care about.

Market is very limited here so we have select companies with limited selection available. Currently I can pick up Lian Li SL/AL Uni Fans and their Galahad SL 360mm AIO. There are also some Cooler Master AIOs available but for some reason there are no fans available from them.

Please give advice on what I can do?
I use a ID-Cooling Auraflow 360mm liquid cooling with my 5950x. Before upgrading from a 240mm I had a 5600x. Now the 5950x, EVGA RTX 3080tI FTW3 ultra. The 5950x is a busy processor and idle temps wander from 41c-5xc. The 240mm was borderline cooling. The 5600x was ~31c at idle. 5950x no manual OC all auto. DOHP that's it. CPU speed is all over the map depending on load. I have seen 5+GHz. Never see temps running stress tests past 79c. Nutty CPU. LoL.
 
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Karadjgne

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Nothing wrong with your temps. It's a Ryzen, not an intel, so throw out any preconceived notions of temps as such, they don't apply.

Gpu is a little warm, but that could be attributed to airflow, dirt in the heatsink, an OC etc. You'd need to manually control your intakes at a specific partial gpu load and see if/when/how much gpu temps change. It could just be you have airflow fans in front and require more pressure balanced fans to actually get the air to the gpu.
 
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fpga123

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They did nothing? Ok. What if you:
Grab a desk or table fan, remove the chassis side panel, and aim the fan inside the PC.
Run the fan on high and check load temperatures again.

If that hardly changes, that's your liquid metal application, not the AIO.
I'll make pics of the liquid metal application for you to judge.
 

fpga123

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Nothing wrong with your temps. It's a Ryzen, not an intel, so throw out any preconceived notions of temps as such, they don't apply.

Gpu is a little warm, but that could be attributed to airflow, dirt in the heatsink, an OC etc. You'd need to manually control your intakes at a specific partial gpu load and see if/when/how much gpu temps change. It could just be you have airflow fans in front and require more pressure balanced fans to actually get the air to the gpu.
I was trying to get it to top off below 90 so all its potential can be cashed in.
 

fpga123

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I use a ID-Cooling Auraflow 360mm liquid cooling with my 5950x. Before upgrading from a 240mm I had a 5600x. Now the 5950x, EVGA RTX 3080tI FTW3 ultra. The 5950x is a busy processor and idle temps wander from 41c-5xc. The 240mm was borderline cooling. The 5600x was ~31c at idle. 5950x no manual OC all auto. DOHP that's it. CPU speed is all over the map depending on load. I have seen 5+GHz. Never see temps running stress tests past 79c. Nutty CPU. LoL.
I have checked that the casing fans top off at 1400 rpm so i guess the ones am planning to buy will make a difference with their 1800 rpm capacities.
 

Phaaze88

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I don't have a fan like that. Only a big one in the ceiling.
Fiddlesticks...


What if you go into bios, disable the turbo boost and check thermals again?
[Looking at the manual, Gigabyte calls it Core Performance Boost? Bios > Advanced Mode > Tweaker tab > Advanced Cpu Settings, it should be there. Disable it, save, exit, and test.]
None of the cores should go over 3.7ghz. If it's still getting hot after that...
 
Hi
When I installed my 5900x and tested it before adjusting the Mobo limits of Ppt, Tdc, Edc and Curve Optimizer it ran way hotter.
After watching some YouTube videos,
1 caught my attention and I followed his lead and my temps came down by about 10-12c running Cb R23.
When opening simple tasks with Hwinfo64 open I can see it boost to 5.050-5.075ghz.
When I play Ghost Recon BreakPoint depending what is going on I have seen it hit 4975ghz.
Now when running cbr23 it tops out @74-76c depending on my room temp with a Corsair H150i Elite Capellix (360mm)

Here is the video
View: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=nvVs_6Sr3wU&feature=youtu.be


Good luck !!!!!!!!!!!
 
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Karadjgne

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I have checked that the casing fans top off at 1400 rpm so i guess the ones am planning to buy will make a difference with their 1800 rpm capacities.
No. Fans don't work that way for the most part. A fan has 2 properties, static pressure and cfm. Those properties can change with design. So it's possible to have a fan that's 50cfm/0.5mh at 1000rpm and a different fan that's 50cfm/0.5mh at 2000rpm. Run both fans at 1000rpm and the second fan will get closer to 30cfm/0.05mh instead.

Having 3 distinct variances in fans (high cfm, high pressure and balanced) you'll need to decide what's necessary. Generally for case fans, intakes should be high pressure or balanced, and exhausts should be high cfm. There's a need to get air all the way across the case to the gpu at intake, pressure does that cfm doesn't. There's a need to move maximum air out and cfm dies that pressure us useless.

For rads, you'll need balanced, high sp is good, pushes the air between the fins, but without sufficient amount of cfm, you get a lot of force and little air moving.

Fan design dictates how air moves in a case, not simply rpm.
 
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fpga123

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Fiddlesticks...


What if you go into bios, disable the turbo boost and check thermals again?
[Looking at the manual, Gigabyte calls it Core Performance Boost? Bios > Advanced Mode > Tweaker tab > Advanced Cpu Settings, it should be there. Disable it, save, exit, and test.]
None of the cores should go over 3.7ghz. If it's still getting hot after that...
Even under load it didn't increase above 61C with PBO disabled.
 

fpga123

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No. Fans don't work that way for the most part. A fan has 2 properties, static pressure and cfm. Those properties can change with design. So it's possible to have a fan that's 50cfm/0.5mh at 1000rpm and a different fan that's 50cfm/0.5mh at 2000rpm. Run both fans at 1000rpm and the second fan will get closer to 30cfm/0.05mh instead.

Having 3 distinct variances in fans (high cfm, high pressure and balanced) you'll need to decide what's necessary. Generally for case fans, intakes should be high pressure or balanced, and exhausts should be high cfm. There's a need to get air all the way across the case to the gpu at intake, pressure does that cfm doesn't. There's a need to move maximum air out and cfm dies that pressure us useless.

For rads, you'll need balanced, high sp is good, pushes the air between the fins, but without sufficient amount of cfm, you get a lot of force and little air moving.

Fan design dictates how air moves in a case, not simply rpm.
I know all this. When I talk about the rpm that means that the front has high pressure fans, the back with a high air flow fan. Haven't seen any middle ground products though. They are either of the two.
 

fpga123

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Hi
When I installed my 5900x and tested it before adjusting the Mobo limits of Ppt, Tdc, Edc and Curve Optimizer it ran way hotter.
After watching some YouTube videos,
1 caught my attention and I followed his lead and my temps came down by about 10-12c running Cb R23.
When opening simple tasks with Hwinfo64 open I can see it boost to 5.050-5.075ghz.
When I play Ghost Recon BreakPoint depending what is going on I have seen it hit 4975ghz.
Now when running cbr23 it tops out @74-76c depending on my room temp with a Corsair H150i Elite Capellix (360mm)

Here is the video
View: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=nvVs_6Sr3wU&feature=youtu.be


Good luck !!!!!!!!!!!
Man this has been the best advice in this thread. I have been able to reduce temps to 87C with cbr23. Gone the days of 94C temps. Idle temps also fell by 14C to 41C.
 
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Phaaze88

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Even under load it didn't increase above 61C with PBO disabled.
...
Gone the days of 94C temps.
Umm, what have you been using to monitor this cpu's temperatures? Max operating temperature is stated to be 90C for the 5900X: https://www.amd.com/en/products/cpu/amd-ryzen-9-5900x

Haven't seen any middle ground products though.
Noctua NF-A12x25, NF-A14
be quiet! Silent Wings 3(120mm), Silent Wings 3(140mm high speed)
Arctic P12, P14
^Those are a few that draw a balance between SP and AF... at least as far as 100% of their rpm is concerned, but not many people do that, so that's mostly a moot point. Below 100%, the middle ground is up in the air.
 
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fpga123

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Umm, what have you been using to monitor this cpu's temperatures? Max operating temperature is stated to be 90C for the 5900X: https://www.amd.com/en/products/cpu/amd-ryzen-9-5900x


Noctua NF-A12x25, NF-A14
be quiet! Silent Wings 3(120mm), Silent Wings 3(140mm high speed)
Arctic P12, P14
^Those are a few that draw a balance between SP and AF... at least as far as 100% of their rpm is concerned, but not many people do that, so that's mostly a moot point. Below 100%, the middle ground is up in the air.
On CPUID hwmonitor, the max temps have regularly registered over 90C temps on the package and CCD #0. Essentially those are momentary spikes, not consistent temps.

As for the products, none of those brands are available in the market in my country unfortunately.

Regardless, are you also of the opinion that swapping of fans won't amount to anything substantial, cosnidering an eventual 3070's addition to the system?
 

Phaaze88

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On CPUID hwmonitor, the max temps have regularly registered over 90C temps on the package and CCD #0. Essentially those are momentary spikes, not consistent temps.
That's going to lead to a little confusion, since AMD has them running based on an average.
Is there a CPU(Tctl/Tdie) reading like HWINFO has? Probably better to switch over to HWINFO if it doesn't.


Regardless, are you also of the opinion that swapping of fans won't amount to anything substantial, cosnidering an eventual 3070's addition to the system?
I'm a bit torn, honestly.
I know 240mm AIOs can handle the entire Ryzen 5000 lineup fine - maybe not all of them, since one of the most discerning differences between AIOs are the fans used.
The Levante AIO did get a decent conclusion from a TPU review(tested with 8700k), but it uses round frame fans, which are less efficient than square framed on radiators, at least when used as push.

It's a bummer that an external fan wasn't on hand for that cooling test I suggested. That one about disabling Core Performance Boost was on a whim, and doesn't accurately reflect how you'll use the cpu at all.

The 3070Ti will add much more heat(~200w) inside the chassis than the 1060 that the AIO will have to deal with... I would rather move it to the front - if it were possible.
 

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