Question 5900x overheating problem with Neptwin RGB cooler

Jan 13, 2022
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Hello there, recently, I've swapped 5600x to 5900x and everything was fine, it booted normally, although it showed "vga" and took longer time to boot, but it still booted without a problem into the windows, however, the temps were something that really caught my eye, as if you open say opera, it will jump from 40-50's C to 70-76's C , which is not my cup of tea, since it's pretty hot for such a low usage cpu, so now all kinds of thoughts running through my head as to what could have caused that sort of amount of heat... I mean, I was very delicate during the installation, only touched the sides, never the bottom, also I was wearing an ESD bracelet, and also, I've tried to kind of clean socket little bit, but it turned out, that, I'm only gonna spread it more, so I've left it what it was and just inserted the cpu into the socket. So yeah, it's either the cooling is not enough, or I've applied thermal paste incorrectly which I redid 3rd time ( I thought I had it too much), so any ideas where could I start looking for a solution ?

MSI B550M Pro Vdh ( Latest bios installed, except for the newly released BETA one)
RTX 3060 Manli
32 GB Vengeance 3000Mhz
AeroCool 750W RGB
1 TB GYGABYTE NVME
500 GB Samsung Nvme
Windows 11-64 bit 22000.856

It's after I took the 5600x, I was using MX-4 By the way.

https://prnt.sc/s3ek-8hAnAY2

That's after I've repasted it 2nd time

https://prnt.sc/O_dMDpaeRN7g
https://prnt.sc/O7s1rXU0nk5Y
 
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...it will jump from 40-50's C to 70-76's C ...
That Neptwin RGB looks big enough to do a decent job. You're placing way too much thermal paste on the CPU. Only a small pea size dot is needed. Cleaning the excess off the board, especially the socket, might be a good idea but don't try too hard. It's very easy to damage the contacts in the socket.

Those temps are normal for 5900X CPU's and typical even of fairly light processing as a single core boosts briefly to max clock and registers a high temp - the hottest spot in the CPU - when it does. That's just the way Ryzen CPU's work.

No idea what you're using to monitor temps with but HWInfo64 has CPU Die (average) temp reading. That reading averages the hot spot temps and shows you the true thermal state of the die...and look at the average column of that sensor reading to see the temp as it changes over time. This will give you a much better idea of the CPU temp than looking at hot-spot sensors.

You can expect the average temps to peak up in the 80-85C range with super heavy, all core work. Something like Cinebench 20 for a half hour or so. That is, if your Neptwin cooler is as good as it is big. If not it's not unlikely to hit as high as 90C. AMD's told us this is normal and expected.

 
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Jan 13, 2022
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That Neptwin RGB looks big enough to do a decent job. You're placing way too much thermal paste on the CPU. Only a small pea size dot is needed. Cleaning the excess off the board, especially the socket, might be a good idea but don't try too hard. It's very easy to damage the contacts in the socket.

Those temps are normal for 5900X CPU's and typical even of fairly light processing as a single core boosts briefly to max clock and registers a high temp - the hottest spot in the CPU - when it does. That's just the way Ryzen CPU's work.

Not sure what you're using to monitor temps with. Get HWInfo 64 and look for the CPU Die (average) temp reading. That reading averages the hot spot temps and shows you the true thermal state of the die...and look at the average column of that sensor reading to see the temp as it changes over time. This will give you a much better idea of the CPU temp than looking at hot-spot sensors.
Yeah man I was using hwmonitor and ryzen master for comparison, it was very small difference maybe up to ~5C, well I've tried my best to clean the socket, but like you said, its very delicate, so I was just trying to clean it just a little bit, as for the temps, yeah but during occt it did jumped to 80's.
 
Yeah man I was using hwmonitor and ryzen master for comparison, it was very small difference maybe up to ~5C, well I've tried my best to clean the socket, but like you said, its very delicate, so I was just trying to clean it just a little bit, as for the temps, yeah but during occt it did jumped to 80's.
Don't worry too much about excess paste as it won't harm anything. That is, so long as it doesn't get packed into one of the tiny socket holes in the CPU socket. That's easy to do if not really careful.

OCCT is actually much worse than Cinebench. It's not a realistic load, in fact far beyond worse-case. So if it's only hitting mid 80's then you pretty good IMO.

Use Cinebench if you want to know what it's like doing a real workload. There's also some Blender sample image renders you can run for a different sort of processing load, or a Handbrake x264 render of some really long videos. They are real world representative of what the system has to easily handle with stability with a long service life.
 
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Reactions: MEMOFLEX and KyaraM
Jan 13, 2022
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Don't worry too much about excess paste as it won't harm anything. That is, so long as it doesn't get packed into one of the tiny socket holes in the CPU socket. That's easy to do if not really careful.

OCCT is actually much worse than Cinebench. It's not a realistic load, in fact far beyond worse-case. So if it's only hitting mid 80's then you pretty good IMO.

Use Cinebench if you want to know what it's like doing a real workload. There's also some Blender sample image renders you can run for a different sort of processing load, or a Handbrake x264 render of some really long videos. They are real world so representative of what the system has to easily handle to have long service life and be stable.
Well, yeah it reached 85C on extreme and I shut it off imediatelly, from what I heard, if there was a paste in the socket or in the pins, pc wont boot at all, or it would be crash and errors, is that correct?
 
Well, yeah it reached 85C on extreme and I shut it off imediatelly, from what I heard, if there was a paste in the socket or in the pins, pc wont boot at all, or it would be crash and errors, is that correct?
Read that article I linked above...don't be afraid of 85C, or even 90C. Even if not desireable to operate there (mainly because of much lowered performance since it's not boosting as high) it's designed and built for that.

It depends on the particular socket or sockets that get damaged. It might not boot or it might operate in an impaired state such as loss of one memory channel or be unstable in use.
 
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Yeah I just did, the article was very helpful by the way, and how you would brush it the socket if that was the amd one?
 
Yeah I just did, the article was very helpful by the way, and how you would brush it the socket if that was the amd one?
I would use a cotton swab, possibly moistened in isopropyl alcohol, and wipe it off around the edges. Always wipe away from the socket holes. Anything in the area with all the holes, just leave it. Use a lot of swabs, wipe once or twice then discard and get new.

But your socket picture doesn't look bad, I'd just leave it. Maybe wipe off the handle since it's kind of bad getting on your fingers and spreading it all over.
 
Jan 13, 2022
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I would use a cotton swab, possibly moistened in isopropyl alcohol, and wipe it off around the edges. Always wipe away from the socket holes. Anything in the area with all the holes, just leave it. Use a lot of swabs, wipe once or twice then discard and get new.

But your socket picture doesn't look bad, I'd just leave it. Maybe wipe off the handle since it's kind of bad getting on your fingers and spreading it all over.
Yeah it is sticky like the toothpaste 😃Yeah I use 96% alcohol so I just paper towel and cotton swabs to clean it, but its still pretty hard to clean it completely.
 
Yeah it is sticky like the toothpaste 😃Yeah I use 96% alcohol so I just paper towel and cotton swabs to clean it, but its still pretty hard to clean it completely.
It's not harmful and this isn't a time or place to let your OCD take control so use good judgment for where to get it off. These forums are packed with people who've cleaned their computer to death, don't be one of those!
 
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It's not harmful and this isn't a time or place to let your OCD take control so use good judgment for where to get it off. These forums are packed with people who've cleaned their computer to death, don't be one of those!
Yeah I know 😄its is a bit of an OCD, but people are very helpful in here, so I am not alone then😄 but since the pc components are quite fragile and delicate, it puts you in a bit of panic mode ya know😄
 
Hello there, recently, I've swapped 5600x to 5900x and everything was fine, it booted normally, although it showed "vga" and took longer time to boot, but it still booted without a problem into the windows, however, the temps were something that really caught my eye, as if you open say opera, it will jump from 40-50's C to 70-76's C , which is not my cup of tea, since it's pretty hot for such a low usage cpu, so now all kinds of thoughts running through my head as to what could have caused that sort of amount of heat... I mean, I was very delicate during the installation, only touched the sides, never the bottom, also I was wearing an ESD bracelet, and also, I've tried to kind of clean socket little bit, but it turned out, that, I'm only gonna spread it more, so I've left it what it was and just inserted the cpu into the socket. So yeah, it's either the cooling is not enough, or I've applied thermal paste incorrectly which I redid 3rd time ( I thought I had it too much), so any ideas where could I start looking for a solution ?

MSI B550M Pro Vdh ( Latest bios installed, except for the newly released BETA one)
RTX 3060 Manli
32 GB Vengeance 3000Mhz
AeroCool 750W RGB
1 TB GYGABYTE NVME
500 GB Samsung Nvme
Windows 11-64 bit 22000.856

It's after I took the 5600x, I was using MX-4 By the way.

https://prnt.sc/s3ek-8hAnAY2

That's after I've repasted it 2nd time

https://prnt.sc/O_dMDpaeRN7g
https://prnt.sc/O7s1rXU0nk5Y
Just a note on repasting: For Ryzen and the nature of the layout of the CCX under the IHS, for the larger core heavy procs (5900x/5950x) it's best to use the credit card/spread method, or 4 dots.
 
Jan 13, 2022
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Just a note on repasting: For Ryzen and the nature of the layout of the CCX under the IHS, for the larger core heavy procs (5900x/5950x) it's best to use the credit card/spread method, or 4 dots.
You mean like like, put some paste on it and then spread it ? same with the small dots ?
 
So for the card spread, put a line on it and use a card or spatula to spread it thinly over the entire IHS. Then be careful wiping away any over residue. Might take a couple of goes to get it right. Then replace cooler back on with criss cross the screws from one diagonal to the other.

The dot method is different. If you imagine the (rough) square shape of the chip IHS and place 4-5 small dots (or more, you can do 6 or up to 9 on a ThreadRipper) Then you simply place the cooler back, but screw the screws in from one corner to another. The pressure of tightening the screws diagonally, will even the paste out over the entire IHS.

This video gives a good illustration of the different methods. The line method is also used, some with one single line, and then with an X shape. Try them and see what give best results: Best Thermal Paste application visually explained : pcmasterrace (reddit.com)
 
Jan 13, 2022
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So for the card spread, put a line on it and use a card or spatula to spread it thinly over the entire IHS. Then be careful wiping away any over residue. Might take a couple of goes to get it right. Then replace cooler back on with criss cross the screws from one diagonal to the other.

The dot method is different. If you imagine the (rough) square shape of the chip IHS and place 4-5 small dots (or more, you can do 6 or up to 9 on a ThreadRipper) Then you simply place the cooler back, but screw the screws in from one corner to another. The pressure of tightening the screws diagonally, will even the paste out over the entire IHS.

This video gives a good illustration of the different methods. The line method is also used, some with one single line, and then with an X shape. Try them and see what give best results: Best Thermal Paste application visually explained : pcmasterrace (reddit.com)
Hmm I see, but if you twist a little or move the cooler while already applied on the cpu (since I have to secure it with screws and it's not really easy to not move anything), does that makes it a do over then ?
 
Hmm I see, but if you twist a little or move the cooler while already applied on the cpu (since I have to secure it with screws and it's not really easy to not move anything), does that makes it a do over then ?

Hmmm, possibly. I'm not sure of the advantage that a twist might bring. It's no harm to try it as is. If you find it's not what you expect, then try again. Applying pressure with just the cooler alone, may give a better spread than adding a twist in.
 
Hmm I see, but if you twist a little or move the cooler while already applied on the cpu (since I have to secure it with screws and it's not really easy to not move anything), does that makes it a do over then ?
The paste is very compliant (gooey) when fresh and will easily spread out when squeezed by the CPU screws. I don't see a reason it should need a do-over if it's just a twist and not completely removed. The big problem with needing to repaste is if you move the cooler (even a twist) when the paste is old and dried out. That leaves cracks in the dried paste that won't refill (like it will when fresh and gooey) and probably less effective.

Don't stress yourself about a perfect application. The difference between close enough and absolutely perfect is less than a degree. Considering how dynamically Ryzen operates you'd never notice that in use.
 
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The paste is very compliant (gooey) when fresh and will easily spread out when squeezed by the CPU screws. I don't see a reason it should need a do-over if it's just a twist and not completely removed. The big problem with needing to repaste is if you move the cooler (even a twist) when the paste is old and dried out. That leaves cracks in the dried paste that won't refill (like it will when fresh and gooey) and probably less effective.

Don't stress yourself about a perfect application. The difference between close enough and absolutely perfect is less than a degree. Considering how dynamically Ryzen operates you'd never notice that in use.
Yeah I know, I just put the paste on it and screw it tightly, it actually gone around 5C~ less when I've opened the chrome or opera, but in games in did jumped to 79C~ or so. As for AIO, if I put 360mm radiator in front of the case, then the rest of the compoents would be warm, since I only have space for 2 fans on tops of the case so 360mm wouldnt fit, so should I put 240mm on top instead?
 
Applying method is irrelevant of CPU core configuration and cooler as long as whole IHS is covered with enough paste AFTER cooler is installed and tightened properly, it's pressure will do final spread. Whole IHS is made of material that conducts heat as fast as possible so it should be covered edge to edge. Only consideration is to prevent air baubles as they are insulator. A proper sized blob in the center will let cooler base to make as good contact as possible as neither cooler base or CPU are perfectly flat.
Too little paste means improper coverage but too much means just a possible mess.
 
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Yeah I know, I just put the paste on it and screw it tightly, it actually gone around 5C~ less when I've opened the chrome or opera, but in games in did jumped to 79C~ or so. As for AIO, if I put 360mm radiator in front of the case, then the rest of the compoents would be warm, since I only have space for 2 fans on tops of the case so 360mm wouldnt fit, so should I put 240mm on top instead?
Temperature of air coming from properly sized radiator is just few degrees above ambient and more of air coming from radiator means lover temp. Those few degrees have little impact on really hot parts like GPU and that can be compensated by proper case ventilation. Front radiator as intake helps keeping CPU cooler while having little to no impact to case temps.
Whole idea of cooling in the case is to have as much air going thru as practicable and that means having enough exhaust to balance the intake. a bit of positive pressure in the case may mean better air flow distribution to parts that are not directly exposed to air stream. That's where case configuration comes into play and is more important than sheer number of fans.
 
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Temperature of air coming from properly sized radiator is just few degrees above ambient and more of air coming from radiator means lover temp. Those few degrees have little impact on really hot parts like GPU and that can be compensated by proper case ventilation. Front radiator as intake helps keeping CPU cooler while having little to no impact to case temps.
Whole idea of cooling in the case is to have as much air going thru as practicable and that means having enough exhaust to balance the intake. a bit of positive pressure in the case may mean better air flow distribution to parts that are not directly exposed to air stream. That's where case configuration comes into play and is more important than sheer number of fans.
I was thinking of maybe putting D15S, I've always wanted to try the Noctua cooler, but I'm not exactly sure about the space it's gonna cover, especially the pcie 16x slot that is next to a CPU, however, when I looked at the compatibility list, it shows that my mobo is fine with the cooler, does that include the gpu as well ?
 
... when I looked at the compatibility list, it shows that my mobo is fine with the cooler...
Do you mean Noctua's compatibility list? if it's listing your motherboard as being compatible I should think that means they're saying it won't interfere with the GPU once installed. But equally important is whether it fits in your case without interfering with the side cover. Also that your memory will fit under the fans as there are some DIMM kits with high profile heatsink/RGB decorations that may not.

And lastly: the biggest problem you can have with an air cooler is getting case ventilation right. It's easy for the GPU's exhaust to wind up being drawn into the CPU cooler and those things are just as effective using that hot air to heat up the CPU. You want to make certain there's a good draft of cool outside air from the front fans for the CPU cooler to use.
 
Just reading and in my opinion you used FAR too much paste. Take the cooler off, clean off the cooler, then clean off the top of the cpu. I’d probably use a q tip dipped in alcohol to clean around the socket.

I have a 5900x as well, I am using this case, with 6 fans installed.


For a cooler I’m using the vetroo v5 like this one. But I’ve got 2 fans on it and using a push pull configuration.

https://www.newegg.com/vetroo-v5/p/13C-00F3-00002

Also using Arctic silver mx4 like you. When you apply paste, put a dot about the size of a small pea or a grain of rice in the center, use your finger to spread the paste in a thin layer over the cpu surface.

Mount the cooler like normal and see what you get. With this setup my idle temp is in the 20s usually. Under a full load of cinebench r23 or a 10 pass run of Intel burn test I’m staying right at 70-72 under load. In fact I did almost that well using the same method with a wraith prism stock cooler. So your big thing is airflow.

However when you use as much paste as you used, you are insulating the cpu and slowly cooking it. You just need enough to let it make good contact with the cooler and fill in any gaps. If you put too much on your temps will actually go up and could harm the cpu.

In summary….

  1. Clean your cpu, cooler and possibly socket and remove all paste(at least most)
  2. Apply a lot less paste and mount the cooler again
  3. Check the airflow setup in your case as well the more cool air you get flowing the less heat that will build up and make it easier for your cpu cooler to do it’s job.
 

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