Question 5900x which core is the one that boosts to 4.8GHz?

emitfudd

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I use MSI Afterburner to monitor my CPU and GPU temps while gaming. In the past I have always set it to monitor core 0. I know some cores run hotter than others on most chips but since the 5900x only boosts to 4.8GHz on a single core it would make sense to monitor THAT core. Anybody know which one it is. I know I could set Afterburner to monitor all the core temps but I don't want to clutter up my screen that much which is why I usually just monitor one core.
 
I use MSI Afterburner to monitor my CPU and GPU temps while gaming. In the past I have always set it to monitor core 0. I know some cores run hotter than others on most chips but since the 5900x only boosts to 4.8GHz on a single core it would make sense to monitor THAT core. Anybody know which one it is. I know I could set Afterburner to monitor all the core temps but I don't want to clutter up my screen that much which is why I usually just monitor one core.
More precisely: it only boosts on a single core at a time. It may very well boost on all cores at separate times.

Get HWInfo64 and follow instructions in this thread to set it up to be responsive and catch more of the CPU's action. Now monitor each core's clock...or multiplier either works. You can right click on each cores sensor reading and create a graph on the desktop to monitor each core. You should see how they boost much better that way.

Ryzen 5000 is much, much better at boosting with many CPU's all cores hitting max boost clocks very frequently. My 3700X is very early silicon so only six cores are hitting 4400Mhz max boost clocks, but three of those frequently hit 4425. And I have to enable PBO to get even that.
 

emitfudd

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More precisely: it only boosts on a single core at a time. It may very well boost on all cores at separate times.

Get HWInfo64 and follow instructions in this thread to set it up to be responsive and catch more of the CPU's action. Now monitor each core's clock...or multiplier either works. You can right click on each cores sensor reading and create a graph on the desktop to monitor each core. You should see how they boost much better that way.

Ryzen 5000 is much, much better at boosting with many CPU's all cores hitting max boost clocks very frequently. My 3700X is very early silicon so only six cores are hitting 4400Mhz max boost clocks, but three of those frequently hit 4425. And I have to enable PBO to get even that.
I think my best bet is to set Afterburner to monitor all the core temps. I just won't set them all to display in the OSD while gaming. I'll try HWInfo64 too. The more information the better.
 

emitfudd

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I installed Ryzen master and it shows cores 2 and 11 as the fastest. I noticed my maximum core speed is listed as 4900MHz. I also observed this when I ran Timespy. I let Ryzen master do the auto oc and it said max core speed was 5050MHz. I turned it back to the default setting for now. At least I got a good chip.
 
I installed Ryzen master and it shows cores 2 and 11 as the fastest. I noticed my maximum core speed is listed as 4900MHz. I also observed this when I ran Timespy. I let Ryzen master do the auto oc and it said max core speed was 5050MHz. I turned it back to the default setting for now. At least I got a good chip.
I can imagine cores 2 and 11 aren't the ONLY cores boosting to 4900; maybe not even to 5050 with autoOC. ALL cores in gen 3 and 4 CPU's are ranked and the OS prioritizes work to the cores accordingly with the scheduler. It's called CPPC.

But keep in mind that while the scheduler may prioritize the cores based on ranking order the processor's boosting algorithm decides when, how high and for how long to boost a core based on things like thermal headroom and power/core current margins. It makes sense that the 'better' cores should be able to work with lower power draw and temperature so the algorithm responds with a little higher boost. You can affect those margins with PBO or just putting on really good CPU cooling but both together are ideal.
 
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emitfudd

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I can imagine cores 2 and 11 aren't the ONLY cores boosting to 4900; maybe not even to 5050 with autoOC. ALL cores in gen 3 and 4 CPU's are ranked and the OS prioritizes work to the cores accordingly with the scheduler. It's called CPPC.

But keep in mind that while the scheduler may prioritize the cores based on ranking order the processor's boosting algorithm decides when, how high and for how long to boost a core based on things like thermal headroom and power/core current margins. It makes sense that the 'better' cores should be able to work with lower power draw and temperature so the algorithm responds with a little higher boost. You can affect those margins with PBO or just putting on really good CPU cooling but both together are ideal.
I'm using a 360mm AIO and it is keeping things pretty cool. I will most likely leave the CPU at stock speeds. Boosting to 4.9 is amazing to me at these "normal" temps. I had to delid my 7700K to keep the temps decent with the same cooler. I had it OC'd to 5.0GHz and it still ran hotter than this one does. Cool temps, stock speeds and only .1GHz difference. I am happy with that.
 

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