Question 6-pin to 8-pin or 6-pin to 4-pin

kivestkristjan

Prominent
Jan 19, 2019
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I got a new PC today, but it has one 6-pin and one 4-pin connector. My RX 570 uses 8-pin so
I want to know if its better to use an adapter that converts 6-pin to 8-pin or an adpater
that converts 6-pin to 4-pin and also use that other 4-pin that my PSU has to connect with my GPU
My PSU is 500W

-Thanks!
 

King_V

Distinguished
Neither.

An 8-pin connector means that the card using it expects to be able to draw up to 150W from it. A 6-pin, the card expects to draw up to 75W from it.

Converting a 6-pin cable to plug into an 8-pin connector means the card could well draw far more power than the 6-pin wiring is designed for. At best, this will cause a crash. Maybe a PSU failure. At worst, a fire.

The 4-pin connector is not intended for video cards. Don't use it.

The ONLY acceptable adapter would be one that converts TWO 6-pin connectors into a single 8-pin connector.

You need a new power supply. That a 500W PSU doesn't have a single 8-pin (also offered as a 6+2 connector), or a pair of 6-pin connectors, tells me that it's probably not a very good one.

What is the exact brand and model of your PSU?
 
Reactions: John Chesterfield

King_V

Distinguished
  1. As a 500W that doesn't have either a single 8-pin, or a pair of 6-pin connectors, it's likely no good. Even Dell's 460W PSUs come with a pair of 6-pin connectors.
  2. I have never heard of Technoware. That immediately makes me suspicious.
  3. Looking at the label, it only provides 336W on the 12V rail. The vast majority of the power used by modern PCs is off the 12V rail. For all intents and purposes, it's a 336W PSU, and given that kind of shady practice, I would not trust it to power a calculator, much less a PC of any kind.
The PSU is the life-blood of your system. It will keep your system running for years, and protect it from power anomalies, if it's a good one. If it's a bad one, it will fail AND possibly damage your expensive components. A particularly bad one can be a fire hazard.

However, one of the most common mistakes made is to not use a good quality PSU. Unfortunately, there are a lot of bad PSUs out there, some of which try to outright misrepresent what they're capable of supporting.

Take a look at the first link in my signature for recommendations. Replace that PSU immediately!
 
Reactions: The Big Technowski
Jan 8, 2020
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If you want to experiment just for fun, just to see if you can boot - login windows yeah go ahead.
Expect to get no video output signal. Worst case scenario to listen a strong puff coming from the power supply and the PSU's protections will most probably save the rest of your NEW system (If they have some good electronic components inside and no bad soldering). Do you like to gamble?

If it is a good practice, definitely no. This is what @King_V is explaining above. Your card can demand max 200+W, the 6 pin can provide 75W, an 8-pin connector can provide 150W.

Your PSU uses the same 12V line irrespectivelly how many connectors you gonna adapt upon the graph.card. If the line is unable to provide the requested power with ease, then you invite into your PC system a number of troubles, even if you succeed to have a video output from your card, in the long run you compromise your PC components.

I would returned the PSU back if it is new and with some more money I would bought a better PSU with higher wattage.
 

bignastyid

Titan
Moderator
If you want to experiment just for fun, just to see if you can boot - login windows yeah go ahead.
Expect to get no video output signal. Worst case scenario to listen a strong puff coming from the power supply and the PSU's protections will most probably save the rest of your NEW system (If they have some good electronic components inside and no bad soldering). Do you like to gamble?
You are assuming the PSU has adequate protections. That's a pretty low quality PSU and protections is just one of the many places these manufactures cut costs. The worst case scenario is it kills the system and/or catches fire.
 
Jan 8, 2020
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You are assuming the PSU has adequate protections. That's a pretty low quality PSU and protections is just one of the many places these manufactures cut costs. The worst case scenario is it kills the system and/or catches fire.
Thus I wrote this....
(If they have some good electronic components inside and no bad soldering). Do you like to gamble?
I don't understand where do we disagree with? Except if you mean (with the underline sentence) that the PSU will lack even the basic protections . How many Power Supply Units for computers have you seen the last 5+ years (and generally in your life) that pass the IEC ISO's & regulation for the trading zone of EU and US market and they don't even have the basic protections.
 

bignastyid

Titan
Moderator
My problem is with this
Worst case scenario to listen a strong puff coming from the power supply and the PSU's protections will most probably save the rest of your NEW system
That is not the "worst case" scenario. Worst case scenario the unit has inadequate protections(common on generic units like what the op has) and fries the whole rig. And yes it is quite possible to get generic garbage that has horribly inadequate protection in the US and UK. Raidmax(for example)is still in business and selling units with poor/inadequate protections.
 
Jan 8, 2020
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We can debate as much as you like, who has the most possible worst case scenario is just a theory. Still you don't answer my question. Does this Raidmax is selling fire hazardous PC power supply units agains all the IEC ISO regulations?
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
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There is no real 'debate'.
While a known substrandard PSU, such as the renowned RAIDMAX, or the OP's pile of junk, may work short term OK on a basic system with a low power draw...once you start adding components and 'adapters'...all bets are off.

Safety circuitry? Are you will to bet your components on such a device?
I wouldn't.
 

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