[SOLVED] 650w psu and 500va voltage stabilizer

Sep 17, 2021
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I have a pc that had a generic 500w psu, recently it started making weird noises so i'm on the process of replacing it. To replace it i got a Corsair CV 650w bronze psu, it's the best one i could afford, but my voltage stabilizer can only do 500va
http://www.atomlux.com.ar/web/Estabilizadores-de-tension-Linea-R-Atomlux.php
(This is what i'm talking about, the R500@. sorry i dunno how they're called in english)
My pc doesn't use nowhere near 650w (don't even have a dedicated gpu) it was fine with a 500w one. Will i need a new stabilizer?.
i do have another stabilizer that says 1200va/600w, it's currently being used by a pc that requires even less, so i could swap them around if needed. But i rather not, the cable is too short for the way i have my pc setup.

EDIT: i think they're called AVR, It's not a UPS
 
Last edited:

Paperdoc

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We all have learned that Watts = Volts x Amps. And yet, with UPS's and AVR's, the VA rating is MUCH higher than the actual Watts rating for the outputs. I don't understand why, but that's life.

Your change of PSU will NOT change the power that your computer uses from the wall source. Although it is higher rated, that is the MAX power output limit. What is actually used depends on what your computer requires. You have not changed that. Assuming you also do not have any big change in the work you do with it, then whatever worked before should still work.

However, IF you upgrade to higher-power parts or start doing heavy gaming you never did before, that would change the workload. IF that were to happen, then that swap of AVR units would be a good idea - fit the lower-rated one to the computer with the lower workload ans power consumption.
 

Paperdoc

Champion
Ambassador
We all have learned that Watts = Volts x Amps. And yet, with UPS's and AVR's, the VA rating is MUCH higher than the actual Watts rating for the outputs. I don't understand why, but that's life.

Your change of PSU will NOT change the power that your computer uses from the wall source. Although it is higher rated, that is the MAX power output limit. What is actually used depends on what your computer requires. You have not changed that. Assuming you also do not have any big change in the work you do with it, then whatever worked before should still work.

However, IF you upgrade to higher-power parts or start doing heavy gaming you never did before, that would change the workload. IF that were to happen, then that swap of AVR units would be a good idea - fit the lower-rated one to the computer with the lower workload ans power consumption.
 

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