Question 6600XT question

sparkling1337

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May 2, 2018
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I was looking at the 6600 XT model comparison here:

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G2Ro4Ca_M4M&ab_channel=HardwareUnboxed


The store I am buying my PC from only has a couple of these cards. The MSI card did the best in the test but the reviewer said the card was missing the "dual bar support" which he claimed was a crucial feature. The other two top performing GPUs are missing from the store I am planning on buying the GPU from. There are some other ones though which didn't do as well in the comparison review. My question is, is this dual bar support really all that important?
 

sparkling1337

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May 2, 2018
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"Dual BIOS support" (aussie accent). Not a big deal IMO.

Can we just get a list of the cards that are available and their prices? Right now you're just asking us if the MSI GamingX is a good card (it is).
Sure these are all of the cards available:
gyazo .com/df830d0e52ace8bc852b26b706d22b7b

(remove the spaces because the website doesn't let me post the link)
 

sparkling1337

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I'd say look at the Sapphire Pulse, Sapphire Nitro, and MSI Gaming X
Thanks! One more thing unrelated to this. I heard some guy on the net say that the RDNA3 will require a new motherboard so am I stuck with this GPU for good? I am buying a whole setup with the GIGABYTE X570 AORUS X570 motherboard. Since all of the better GPUs are extremely overpriced (maybe except for the overkill 6900 XT) I thought I might upgrade eventually once the new generation comes out.
 

PEnns

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"One more thing unrelated to this. I heard some guy on the net say that the RDNA3 will require a new motherboard "

No, that's totally wrong info.

The GPU doesn't care about the motherboard and will work with almost any motherboard from the last 10 years (possibly even older).

The CPU does. But not the GPU
 

tennis2

Judicious
Yeah, like PEnns stated, there's no reason RDNA3 would require a new mobo. GPUs are backward compatible on PCIe.

I may not have all the details, but they may be referring to PCIe5.0. You're also not going to see much/any difference from a (wired) x16 (full 16 lanes) GPU going from PCIe3.0 to PCIe5.0 even for the foreseeable future. The consensus is that PCIe5.0 bandwidth benefits will be better realized on storage and IO needs rather than [single] GPUs.

Where the PCIe revision (PCIe3.0 vs PCIe4.0 in this case) starts to matter is on GPUs like the AMD RX-6500XT that AMD [nonsensically] wired as an x4 configuration (only uses 4 of the available 16 lanes in the PCIe socket). Even then, you only really see the difference when you exceed the available VRAM on the card. Because the 6500XT is a "budget" card, AMD determined that 4GB VRAM was enough, and for most 1080p usage, it generally is (for now). But it's not difficult to exceed 4GB for benchmarking purposes, and has a very questionable shelf-life for future games.

FYI, the 6600XT is wired x8.

What this really shows is that (perhaps in light of the global chip shortage) GPU makers are realizing [small] cost benefits of leveraging copious bandwidth afforded by PCIe4.0 (and PCIe5.0 in the future) and "optimizing" wired lanes accordingly. Just a guess, but I'd imagine those decisions would be made assuming PCIe4.0 for a couple GPU generations. The 6500Xt and 6600Xt were perhaps a little premature on that PCIe4.0 assumption.
 
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