[SOLVED] 8 year old office pc lifespan

May 7, 2021
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Hello. I have, about a year ago, bought an 8 year old used office pc with good specs. I also bought it because it was an SFF computer, so it wasn't very large. However, after upgrading the RAM, GPU, and Hard Drive, I noticed something on the old disk before it failed. The disk had been on for 7 years.

The PC has good specs and could likely fit into a gaming tier, but I'm worried more about the components' lifespans.

It's an HP Z220 SFF workstation, with an I5-3470 @ 3.2G

I upgraded it from Windows 7 to Ubuntu 20.04, and the idle for all components except for the hard drive is around 37c, but during gaming they can go up to 60c.

(The hard drive is around 30c all the time)

Should I be concerned about having to replace my mobo or CPU soon?
 
May 7, 2021
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These office builds are typically quite rugged. I would imagine that unless you do something to it, or an electrical storm (etc.) this machine will continue working long into obsolescence.
Okay good. I use the PC for playing Kerbal Space Program a lot. I'm thinking about upgrading the CPU to an I7 which supports the motherboard soon.
 

punkncat

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Okay good. I use the PC for playing Kerbal Space Program a lot. I'm thinking about upgrading the CPU to an I7 which supports the motherboard soon.
I would check to be sure that:

The motherboard is the SAME one as offered with the i7 (if it was offered as such)
That your PSU can actually handle the more power hungry CPU.
Check to see if you have clearance for a better CPU fan inside that case, as well.

3770 should be a decent improvement for the machine and offer a bit more life out of it. In a Dell that I recently did this to I found that adding the i7 actually forced me to remove a 750ti as it wouldn't power up on both. The project was not of a type that a new PSU was 'in budget' (or desire).
 
May 7, 2021
76
7
35
0
I would check to be sure that:

The motherboard is the SAME one as offered with the i7 (if it was offered as such)
That your PSU can actually handle the more power hungry CPU.
Check to see if you have clearance for a better CPU fan inside that case, as well.

3770 should be a decent improvement for the machine and offer a bit more life out of it. In a Dell that I recently did this to I found that adding the i7 actually forced me to remove a 750ti as it wouldn't power up on both. The project was not of a type that a new PSU was 'in budget' (or desire).
Okay, I have the GT 710 for a GPU. The PSU is 240W and I have around 100 watts to spare.
 

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