8mm camcorder capture to DVD

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What are the effective video and audio bitrates of an 8mm analog
camcorder tape? I would like to convert my 8mm tapes to DVD, but don't
want to waste space by using unnecessarily high bitrates. Ideally, I'd
like to copy an entire 2hr tape onto a single DVD.

My first attempt at 8000kbs video and 256kbs audio was successful, but
produced a file that is nearly twice the capacity of a DVD. If I drop
down to 4000kbs video and 128kbs, will I noticeably sacrifice quality?

Since Hollywood can put a multi-million dollar movie on a single DVD
without, I figure there's got to be a decent way for me to put two
hours of home videos on a DVD as well. Any suggestions?
 
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Brian Berns wrote:
> What are the effective video and audio bitrates of an 8mm analog
> camcorder tape? I would like to convert my 8mm tapes to DVD, but don't
> want to waste space by using unnecessarily high bitrates. Ideally, I'd
> like to copy an entire 2hr tape onto a single DVD.
>
> My first attempt at 8000kbs video and 256kbs audio was successful, but
> produced a file that is nearly twice the capacity of a DVD. If I drop
> down to 4000kbs video and 128kbs, will I noticeably sacrifice quality?
>
> Since Hollywood can put a multi-million dollar movie on a single DVD
> without, I figure there's got to be a decent way for me to put two
> hours of home videos on a DVD as well. Any suggestions?

Your on the right track Brian,

Here's some FAQs though:

Hollywood's DVDs are not the same as the consumer DVD. Consumer
writable DVDs are DVD-5 format (4.7gig), and allot of Hollywood DVDs are
DVD-9 format (9.5gig). As of right this minute, they are currently just
now selling writtable DVD-9 format writers, but it will be some time
before this gets to the consumer market. (Hollywood dreads this.. )

You could save some space by using VBR (Variable Bit Rate), instead of a
CBR (Constant Bit Rate). This effetely slows down the bit rate on low
motion scenes, and ups the bit rate on faster scenes. This requires
more time burning as the encoder will go over the encode 2+ times, but
the results can be worth it if your bargaining for space on the DVD.

Also.. consider encoding the sound in a compressed format such as AC3 or
Dolby Digital. This can save you a ton of space for the sound file, and
you can place more video on the DVD.

Which bit rate to use? Unfortunately, your going to have to do trial
and error, and make many many coasters just like the rest of us to find
that happy medium on your system.

Hope this helps out a bit.

-Richard