[SOLVED] 8pin to 2x6pin converter?

Feb 15, 2019
7
0
10
0
So, the title almost explains everything, but my question is whether I could use some kind of adapter(or something similar) to turn the 8pin(coming from the PSU) into 2x6pin. I only have 1 available 8pin, but my GPU requires 2x6pin. All help is appreciated.
 

Math Geek

Champion
Herald
you should be ok with simply splitting the 8-pin into 2 6-pins. system is low powered and the gpu's won't pull 100% of their possible power anyway.

you can get an 8-pin splitter like i linked to and be ok powering the second card.

like everyone else though i do suggest a better psu for long term use though. just because the documentation lists lots of great buzzwords does not mean it actually has them. i don't see any professional reviews for that psu so i can't know for sure how good it is.
 

Math Geek

Champion
Herald
they are right. the psu should have the connections needed or be replaced.

normally folks ask about trying to turn 1 6-pin into 2 8-pins and other nonsense. but in your case, you could actually do it if you wished to. the 8-pin gives 150w (or is supposed to) and a 6-pin gives 75w. so splitting the 8-pin is the same amount of power just different connections.

consider though that your 750w psu should have 4 x 8-pins anyway tells me it may not even be able to handle the 150w possible draw since it did not include the connections for it. theoretically it is possible but in reality i'd do it short term and order a new better quality psu that has all the needed connections.
 
Feb 15, 2019
7
0
10
0
If your running a setup like that , then you should have all the correct cables to run it. A decent 750w would have those connections for two cards.
The PSU has 2x8pins. One of them is powering my rx 480. And the r9 380(that I want to add to the system and use for faster rendering) requires 2x6pins. As I said all help is appreciated. If it's not possible with my current PSU, I would appreciate it, if you could recommend me a PSU that will get the job done.
 
Feb 15, 2019
7
0
10
0
they are right. the psu should have the connections needed or be replaced.

normally folks ask about trying to turn 1 6-pin into 2 8-pins and other nonsense. but in your case, you could actually do it if you wished to. the 8-pin gives 150w (or is supposed to) and a 6-pin gives 75w. so splitting the 8-pin is the same amount of power just different connections.

consider though that your 750w psu should have 4 x 8-pins anyway tells me it may not even be able to handle the 150w possible draw since it did not include the connections for it. theoretically it is possible but in reality i'd do it short term and order a new better quality psu that has all the needed connections.
Is there a way to "check" if the 8pin is giving 150w of power? And how do I "split" the 8pin?
 

Math Geek

Champion
Herald
the adapter you asked about would split the 8-pin into 2 6-pins. easy to find. you only need 6-pins so just break of the +2 and you're good to go.

https://www.amazon.com/Express-Adapter-Graphics-splitter-TeamProfitcom/dp/B0796NVNY7


as far as a way to check would be to use a power meter and load up the connection. like reviewers do when testing products. in general though, if the psu is capable of providing the power, then it gives the connection. if not, then it leaves it off. super low end junk psu's though don't care and would put 600w worth of connections on a 250w psu cause it looks good and folks will buy it.

what is the EXACT psu model you have? take a pic of the label on the side of the psu if you need to. plus what are the rest of the system specs? all this together, will tell me if it's a good idea or not. once i know what kind of power draw you already have vs the psu's capabilities.
 
Feb 15, 2019
7
0
10
0
the adapter you asked about would split the 8-pin into 2 6-pins. easy to find. you only need 6-pins so just break of the +2 and you're good to go.

https://www.amazon.com/Express-Adapter-Graphics-splitter-TeamProfitcom/dp/B0796NVNY7


as far as a way to check would be to use a power meter and load up the connection. like reviewers do when testing products. in general though, if the psu is capable of providing the power, then it gives the connection. if not, then it leaves it off. super low end junk psu's though don't care and would put 600w worth of connections on a 250w psu cause it looks good and folks will buy it.

what is the EXACT psu model you have? take a pic of the label on the side of the psu if you need to. plus what are the rest of the system specs? all this together, will tell me if it's a good idea or not. once i know what kind of power draw you already have vs the psu's capabilities.
Thanks for all the help. Since I am no PSU expert, I just bought what seemed best for the price. And just in case, I checked the box it came in, to make sure that I don't misspell it's name or something. The PSU I bought is named Njoy Woden 750, 80 Plus Gold, ATX, PFC Activ. I will even send a link to the product's homepage https://www.njoy.ro/PSU/woden-750#overview. EDIT As for the rest of my system specs: i5 7600, xfx rx480 8gb, 16gb of ram, b250 gigabyte motherboard(I do not remember it's exact model), hyper 212 evo CPU cooler and 6 case fans.
 
Last edited:

Math Geek

Champion
Herald
actually a pretty nice looking psu. big red flag is when you can't find the label info anywhere on the psu's product page. but i found it elsewhere and the psu provides 612w on the 12v rail which is where most of the pc power goes these days. a quality psu would provide 100% of the available power to the 12v rail and then even more for the minor rails. they are combining the 12v and minor rails together to get total power. better than many we see here for sure. rest of the specs look ok overall.

what are the rest of your pc specs? cpu, gpu and so on so can compute power needs.
 
Feb 15, 2019
7
0
10
0
actually a pretty nice looking psu. big red flag is when you can't find the label info anywhere on the psu's product page. but i found it elsewhere and the psu provides 612w on the 12v rail which is where most of the pc power goes these days. a quality psu would provide 100% of the available power to the 12v rail and then even more for the minor rails. they are combining the 12v and minor rails together to get total power. better than many we see here for sure. rest of the specs look ok overall.

what are the rest of your pc specs? cpu, gpu and so on so can compute power needs.
i5 7600(locked, non-K), xfx rx480 8gb, 16gb of ram, b250 gigabyte motherboard(I do not remember it's exact model), hyper 212 evo CPU cooler and 6 case fans. EDIT 2tb seagate hard drive and one 120gb kingston ssd.
 

Math Geek

Champion
Herald
you should be ok with simply splitting the 8-pin into 2 6-pins. system is low powered and the gpu's won't pull 100% of their possible power anyway.

you can get an 8-pin splitter like i linked to and be ok powering the second card.

like everyone else though i do suggest a better psu for long term use though. just because the documentation lists lots of great buzzwords does not mean it actually has them. i don't see any professional reviews for that psu so i can't know for sure how good it is.
 
Feb 15, 2019
7
0
10
0
you should be ok with simply splitting the 8-pin into 2 6-pins. system is low powered and the gpu's won't pull 100% of their possible power anyway.

you can get an 8-pin splitter like i linked to and be ok powering the second card.

like everyone else though i do suggest a better psu for long term use though. just because the documentation lists lots of great buzzwords does not mean it actually has them. i don't see any professional reviews for that psu so i can't know for sure how good it is.
Well, I'll get the splitter and see how it handles it. And maybe even change to a better psu over time. Once again, thank you for all the help. You even went out of your way to check how the psu performs and even my components's overall power draw. I appreciate it all. Have a nice morning/day/evening.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS