Question 9600K CPU solder reliability/prefomrance

Apr 29, 2019
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Hi All,

I want to buy a 9600K for my gaming PC, but I have been somewhat concerned about the CPU solder reliability for some time after reading this article: https://overclocking.guide/the-truth-about-cpu-soldering/ . I know it's an old one, but it's still physics and the die size is smaller than Ryzen, so the latter may be less susseptible to that kind of damage. I may be over exagerating, but as I intend to use it for 4+ years I want to know the opinion of more knowledgable and experienced people.
What do you think? Is it a valid concern and I should get a 8600K with thermal paste? I would like the clock speeds of the 9600K though and I do not want to delid. Or maybe get a 9700 non-K and also forget about it entirely?

PS. I do not intend to overclock, maybe after 3 years, but I will see how it performs, but that's unlikely as I want to play only on 60 fps.
 

Gam3r01

Titan
Moderator
Here is the only thing you need to get from that article:
"Micro cracks occur after about 200 to 300 thermal cycles. A thermal cycle is performed by going from -55 °C to 125 °C while each temperature is hold for 15 minutes. The micro cracks will grow over time and can damage the CPU permanently if the thermal resistance increases too much or the solder preform cracks completely. "

A processor would never undergo this sort of thermal cycling that leads to the failure they describe.

And my favorite closing statement:
"However, I doubt that Intel will come back with soldered “small DIE CPUs”. Skylake works great even with normal thermal paste so I see no reason why Intel should/would change anything here."

Intel did indeed come back around after subpar results with TIM.
 
Reactions: Sharpman85
Apr 29, 2019
12
0
10
0
Here is the only thing you need to get from that article:
"Micro cracks occur after about 200 to 300 thermal cycles. A thermal cycle is performed by going from -55 °C to 125 °C while each temperature is hold for 15 minutes. The micro cracks will grow over time and can damage the CPU permanently if the thermal resistance increases too much or the solder preform cracks completely. "

A processor would never undergo this sort of thermal cycling that leads to the failure they describe.

And my favorite closing statement:
"However, I doubt that Intel will come back with soldered “small DIE CPUs”. Skylake works great even with normal thermal paste so I see no reason why Intel should/would change anything here."

Intel did indeed come back around after subpar results with TIM.
Indeed, but since the die isgetting smaller and smaller that's a point of concern, although as you have pointed, there is no way those conditions would be present in any home gaming system, more likely with extremem overclockers, but not normal usage.
 
Apr 29, 2019
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Those conditions would likely never be seen even under LN2 conditions either, 125C is beyond the thermal limit, and -55C would never be sustained at that low of a temp.
It seems that the article may not be relevant to CPU usage then and be purely academic in those cases, but they did have die size failure rates so they must have tested it at some point.
 

Gam3r01

Titan
Moderator
Yes, it was more so just a counter article to all the ones discussing the poor TIM quality in intel processors, but has no real merit on real world use.
The unlabeled axis on the graphs dont help either.
 
Apr 29, 2019
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Yes, it was more so just a counter article to all the ones discussing the poor TIM quality in intel processors, but has no real merit on real world use.
The unlabeled axis on the graphs dont help either.
Yes, seems that way. Maybe there is no need to worry about this.
 

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