[SOLVED] A little confused about how my drive shows up as in Disk Manager. Please advice.

Moribund

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OK, this is going to be a bit complex because of some history so bear with me.
I buy a lot of drives for my clients, both for servers (I do IT for some of my travel agency clients as well as residential computer related services). A few years back I started having issues with some Seagate hard drives I purchased. I had to return a bunch of them as they were dead on arrival. So I had a Seagate person mail me a 6 TB hard drive to sort of make up for the crappy drives I've been getting.

I was either the unluckiest person alive or... but that drive had some very odd issues. One time it stopped getting recognised by any of my computers, and I eventually narrowed it down to a Seagate-Seagate firmware conflict. Apparently the 6 Tb drive wouldn't work when paired with another model of Seagate drive which I had in all 3 of my machines. So I started only using it in my main desktop paired with a Samsung Evo SSD and a WD 3 TB drive. But that drive was always very odd. Although every conceivable program from Crystal Disk Info to Speedfan would give it flying colours and although it passed the manufacturer's Long Test it would often take a whole minute to spin up. Sometimes whenever I played music from it - the player would stall and then resume again. However - all the tests still came back fine. (Of course I do realise this doesn't exclude possible hardware issues).

Lately it started giving me I/O errors when plugged through a USB 3 enclosure (enclosure seems to work fine with other drives). So I opened it again in Disk manager and lo and behold: - I realised that when I was recently re-installing my Windows 10, I forgot to remove that 6 TB Seagate drive and of course, - it now had a small Microsoft partition in it. I didn't think it could be the reason for its issues, but I decided to use the CMD Diskpart to remove that partition and extend the much larger partition over it. So I did that.

However, - after the intermittent message flashing and then immediately disappearing about it supposedly not having enough space to extend the partition, - now it shows up in Disk Manager with a yellow-brownish or dirty green border and the colour square at the bottom labels it as "simple volume". There are no options to convert it back from simple volume.

What exactly did I do wrong, and what are the implications? I don't have that much experience with Disk Manager, I prefer to use other software and CMD for working with drives.

Grateful for any advice.

Thanks in advance
 

Lutfij

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yellow-brownish or dirty green border
That seems like the description of a drive in Dynamic Disk mode, not a Basic Disk. I tend to use EaseUS Partition Manager to deal with drives that have issues with partitions. I feel like Windows does grant you tools but other app's are more...intuitive.

Are you sure that the issue is with the Seagate drives or that the BIOS just needed updating on respective platforms to root out instability/compatibility issues?
 

Moribund

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You think BIOS may be the issue? It's just that this problem never occurred to any other drives, just that 6Tb Seagate one. My 3 TB WD "MyBook" is doing just fine, my 4TB SATA - connected Seagate is OK too. And right now that the disk in question (the 6TB Seagate Drive) has the rusty green colour of a dynamic disk - it appears to be readable and usable. Right now that it's connected via SATA it doesn't appear to "fall asleep" and then having difficulties waking up. At least not yet? How likely is this to be BIOS if it's just one drive, and I literally have dozens of others connected on regular basis every week without any issues when I deal with client data?
 

Moribund

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Yeah. Left it alone for like 20 minutes. By now it should be inaccessible and give me I/O error, but since I removed that Windows partition and it somehow became a dynamic disk, so far so good? Are there any other not so well known implication of it being a dynamic disk that I should be aware of?
 

itrip

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I had the same issue with my 10TB Seagate ( just that I deleted the extra partition and extended the volume and it became an dynamic) I did not like that, don't know why but seems odd, so I gave the drive a letter again, copied all my files somewhere ells and formatted and partitioned the drive in question again, and low and behold it was simple again but again with an extra partition (MSR or something) well now I have just left it like that, mine is only 15mb large, besides my drive works flawlessly.

But I might be looking to better the situation as well.

Oh and to add the MSR or whatever partition of my drive doesn't show in disk management, rather only in windows setup.

I might create an thread for my issue alone if it interferes with what's going on here with the Op's issue.
 
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Moribund

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I had the same issue with my 10TB Seagate ( just that I deleted the extra partition and extended the volume and it became an dynamic) I did not like that, don't know why but seems odd, so I gave the drive a letter again, copied all my files somewhere ells and formatted and partitioned the drive in question again, and low and behold it was simple again but again with an extra partition (MSR or something) well now I have just left it like that, mine is only 15mb large, besides my drive works flawlessly.

But I might be looking to better the situation as well.

Oh and to add the MSR or whatever partition of my drive doesn't show in disk management, rather only in windows setup.

I might create an thread for my issue alone if it interferes with what's going on here with the Op's issue.
itrip - Why would it have that extra partition if you re-formatted your drive? "MSR" is the 16 MB Windows partition. For partitions Windows 10 creates (like recovery) - you cannot get rid of it via Disk Manager. You need to use DISKPART via CMD or use a third party program. But if you were able to format the entire drive I honestly don't see how that extra partition could possibly show up.

You had "the same issue" meaning your drive gave you I/O errors when left alone for over 20 minutes?
 

itrip

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Yes in those images you can see that, the drive in question had its volume extended, ( thus the green yellow color) {dynamic} for the most part undesirable result.

Just go ahead and delete it and create a new volume (but for as to how exactly do that on a larger than 2TB drive we'll need to learn how to do it without creating a additional part)

Just don't do anything if you still have files on it you might want to keep.
itrip - Why would it have that extra partition if you re-formatted your drive? "MSR" is the 16 MB Windows partition. For partitions Windows 10 creates (like recovery) - you cannot get rid of it via Disk Manager. You need to use DISKPART via CMD or use a third party program. But if you were able to format the entire drive I honestly don't see how that extra partition could possibly show up.

You had "the same issue" meaning your drive gave you I/O errors when left alone for over 20 minutes?
No , no I/O errors just the extra partition. Sorry I'm not helping your resolve your issue much, as I also trying to resolve my own issue with my drive, mush less of a problem.
 

Moribund

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Yes in those images you can see that, the drive in question had its volume extended, ( thus the green yellow color) {dynamic} for the most part undesirable result.

Just go ahead and delete it and create a new volume (but for as to how exactly do that on a larger than 2TB drive we'll need to learn how to do it without creating a additional part)

Just don't do anything if you still have files on it you might want to keep.
I do have files I want to keep - did you look at the image? If you create a GPT drive rather than MBR - Windows 10 will be able to see more than 2 Tb without needing to create extra partitions. Why do you call it "undesirable"? The need to mount/dismount?
 

itrip

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I do have files I want to keep - did you look at the image? If you create a GPT drive rather than MBR - Windows 10 will be able to see more than 2 Tb without needing to create extra partitions. Why do you call it "undesirable"? The need to mount/dismount?
Undesirable, I'd rather have simple partitions, not dynamic, don't know why but rather not, looks odd too.

Yes I looked at your image.

I believe I did create an as by default GPT, with win 11 setup and then later retried with disk management, same result.
 

Moribund

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6TB device, about 1/2 full.
Dynamic Disk.

If its working, I'd leave it.

But....you DO have a known good backup of this data, correct?
Most of it is indeed backed up on 2 other drives, at least things I would really worry about losing. But yeah, I would prefer not to have to format it again if I could avoid it. There is some voluminous data there that isn't terribly important but it's just over 1.4 TB, so it would take a long while to copy back and forth. Not to mention copy back the backed up data too. It just kinda worries me that I have no explanation for the previous I/O errors, as I don't believe that partition created by Windows could cause it and the hang ups.
 

itrip

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Most of it is indeed backed up on 2 other drives, at least things I would really worry about losing. But yeah, I would prefer not to have to format it again if I could avoid it. There is some voluminous data there that isn't terribly important but it's just over 1.4 TB, so it would take a long while to copy back and forth. Not to mention copy back the backed up data too. It just kinda worries me that I have no explanation for the previous I/O errors, as I don't believe that partition created by Windows could cause it and the hang ups.
Now that's the part I wondering about too, If can eliminate the other partition one can find out if my drive has oddities not yet know because of it.
 

Moribund

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Now that's the part I wondering about too, If can eliminate the other partition one can find out if my drive has oddities not yet know because of it.
Easier said than done. Run CMD as administrator.
Type diskpart hit enter
Type list disk hit enter
Type select disk (look in Disk Manager under Manage in Computer which number it is) hit enter
Type list partition Hit Enter
Type select partition (again look which partition number you need to select)
Hit Enter
Type delete partition override
Hit enter
Now you can extend the larger partition in Disk Manager or look up in Google how to do that in diskpart. I'm just too lazy to type it up ;-))
 

itrip

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Easier said than done. Run CMD as administrator.
Type diskpart hit enter
Type list disk hit enter
Type select disk (look in Disk Manager under Manage in Computer which number it is) hit enter
Type list partition Hit Enter
Type select partition (again look which partition number you need to select)
Hit Enter
Type delete partition override
Hit enter
Now you can extend the larger partition in Disk Manager or look up in Google how to do that in diskpart. I'm just too lazy to type it up ;-))
Thx, isn't there a GUI ,with what one can click your way to glory instead, seems like it can easily go wrong the other way, if you have to change something so delicate with text commands, so eighties, aren't we in the twenties now already, thanks anyways for that.. might check it out besides. seems safest so far, don't want to screw up my perfect install.
 

Moribund

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And the result, of those commands are to be not getting stuck with a dynamic volume again, I doubt that,
Did you get the dynamic volume after you expanded the partition? If so, - and if you don't have a lot of data on the 10 tb drive - then copy the data you consider important and get rid of both partitions, then do a fresh GPT format. Should do the trick. Dynamic volume is no big deal though, it'll work fine too. The reason I inquired about it in my case was because the result is was wholly unintentional (I don't get the same when I expanded smaller volume Seagate and WD drives, and also because of the errors which preceded the expansion.

And yeah. you can also use GUI of AOMEI, EaseUS, etc. I'm just more comfortable and faster with text commands personally. Old habits die hard ))
 

itrip

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In the end of my endeavor encouraged by this thread and my other thread also here in storage section of toms hardware, I had opted for the fresh GPT format, I never wanted a dynamic partition, and me having ended up with one at one point or another in my endeavor was totally by mistake, and an unwanted outcome.

See this thread here how I solved mine, As for if this solves the random I\O that I "heard" with my drive is yet to be seen: [SOLVED] - Knowledgeable HDD partition advice required. | Tom's Hardware Forum (tomshardware.com)

I did this not only to have a better manageable disk for my pc, but also to seek if there was perhaps less I\O when the drive is inactive because of the additional MSR partition that is now not the case anymore, Funny thing is that when I first got this drive (It's a secondhand part) that it had a whopping 150GB MSR partition and then with my attempts it shrunk to 150Mb and then to 15mb and finally to not having that at all, very odd indeed, all well ends well, Totally MSR free and running with a 100% desired disk and partition now.
 
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Moribund

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Yeah, but over there your issue was that you formatted using Windows Installer, so of course it created a hidden Windows partition. And, to be fair, - sure, there actually is a way to use Windows installer to erase the previous MBR/Recovery partition completely. You simply go ahead and delete that partition using Windows installer, or delete all partitions leaving unpartitioned space, - then you shut the PC down by holding the power button and voila - you can now either expand your left over partition (if the drive was GPT formatted to begin with), or re-format the drive as GPT in Disk Management. A somewhat cumbersome way of doing it, but it will work. When the UEFI came about - it sure created a lot of confusion with people, particularly the message: "this disk cannot be used to install Windows on" and frankly, I have an issue with Microsoft just "taking over" a physically separate drive you're NOT installing Windows on (and I've done my share of just forgetting I had another drive connected to my machine) but alas, things are the way they are.

By the way, after unintended conversion to a dynamic disk - my drive still tends to "fall asleep" (even when set to "always on") and takes about 10-20 seconds to wake up. But it's not a minute or longer the way it used to be, and also, so far - no I/O errors. So I suspect I will leave it the way it is for now. But that drive always behaved a little off, even before I accidentally left it in the machine when installing Windows. When that firmware conflict happened out of the blue I got really frustrated and I think I was a little harsh on the Seagate guy (I was polite however). Poor dude tried to save the Seagate reputation on Tom's Hardware and ran into his own company's software policy issues LOL.
 

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