[SOLVED] A question on AIO's

Hey all,

Quick question on AIO coolers. In my own mind I have the answer from research, and having an AIO in my current gaming system.

It's my understanding that when an AIO is functioning correctly, there should be one warm pipe, and one cold/cooler one. This makes sense to me. As the coolant absorbs the heat from the CPU it travels to the rad, heat is expelled, coolant (colder) goes back to CPU, rinse repeat. Is this right?

I've offered this advice on a few threads only to be told that, no, both pipes should be warm. So I'm trying to figure out if that's the case. Every resource I've looked at says the same thing:

CPU Cooler: Liquid Cooling Vs. Air Cooling - Intel
How to buy and install a closed-loop CPU liquid cooler for PCs | PCWorld

Any feedback is appreciated.
 
Last edited:

USAFRet

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Thanks for the reply. Yes, I've linked that one in my thread. That's why I was wondering. It really suggests it's cooler. But as @USAFRet said, the difference seems minimal. I wonder is that 0.2c variance enough to re-absorb heat and remain efficient.
Yes.

The tube FROM the CPU to the RAD is wamer, but not so you'd notice.
Equilibrium.


1.2C difference in the skin temp of the pipes.


0.5C


Equal


Measured with these devices:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01H1RDJOI

Bottom line - If there is a noticeable temp difference, something in the circuit has failed.
 
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USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
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It's my understanding that when an AIO is functioning correctly, there should be one warm pipe, and one cold/cooler one.
Actually, not really. Not so you tell by hand.

Generally, the liquid is moving through the system fast enough it reaches equilibrium.

I've tested this with a Cryorig A80.

2x USB powered thermometer probes, reading the skin temp of each tube.

Under light load, there was at most maybe 0.2C difference between Supply and Return.
Under heavy load (Prime95 or similar), maybe a 3-4C difference, until it too eventually stabilizes.
 
Reactions: Roland Of Gilead
Actually, not really. Not so you tell by hand.

Generally, the liquid is moving through the system fast enough it reaches equilibrium.

I've tested this with a Cryorig A80.

2x USB powered thermometer probes, reading the skin temp of each tube.

Under light load, there was at most maybe 0.2C difference between Supply and Return.
Under heavy load (Prime95 or similar), maybe a 3-4C difference, until it too eventually stabilizes.
Thanks for the reply. So, would that stand too in the case of a failing AIO?
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
161,054
13,284
176,090
24,450
Thanks for the reply. Yes, I've linked that one in my thread. That's why I was wondering. It really suggests it's cooler. But as @USAFRet said, the difference seems minimal. I wonder is that 0.2c variance enough to re-absorb heat and remain efficient.
Yes.

The tube FROM the CPU to the RAD is wamer, but not so you'd notice.
Equilibrium.


1.2C difference in the skin temp of the pipes.


0.5C


Equal


Measured with these devices:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01H1RDJOI

Bottom line - If there is a noticeable temp difference, something in the circuit has failed.
 
Reactions: Roland Of Gilead
Yes.

The tube FROM the CPU to the RAD is wamer, but not so you'd notice.
Equilibrium.


1.2C difference in the skin temp of the pipes.


0.5C


Equal


Measured with these devices:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01H1RDJOI

Bottom line - If there is a noticeable temp difference, something in the circuit has failed.
Okay, understood. Thanks for that.

Was wondering how to put it to other forum questions, in terms of when it's failing, so now I know how it should operate normally, and with very little variance, my advice might be more accurate.

Cheers all for the replies.
 

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