Question A USB gen 3 on/off switch?

TLTH

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Hello. I have an external audio interface connected to my PC, and because the USB ports are set to provide power even when the PC is turned off/sleeping (and it seems you can't choose only specific ports to pause power so it's either all of them have continuous power or having the wireless keyboard/mouse unable to wake the PC up) the interface is always turned on and kept somewhat warmer than I would've liked when it's summer.

So instead of having to remove either side of the USB every time, I'd rather have some sort of intermediate extender that doesn't impede power and data transfer and features an on/off switch. I searched and only found 1 such listing on eBay for an off-brand item that only ships within Australia.

Does anyone know a recommended option for this? Thanks in advance.
 

TLTH

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Any USB Hub with on/off switch like this will do, it's compatible with power and data transfer.

I suppose this is an option, but what I had in mind because I just need it for this one peripheral is like a small intermediary between on of the ports and the cable which has a button. It would be something like this eBay listing I mentioned:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/USB-3-0-USB-3-Inline-On-Off-Switch-/154368580357

Also, is there any chance such hubs introduce less reliable connection or data transfer? As this audio interface is for recording musical instruments at as low a latency as possible, I wonder if this might have a detrimental effect.
 

lvt

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I suppose this is an option, but what I had in mind because I just need it for this one peripheral is like a small intermediary between on of the ports and the cable which has a button. It would be something like this eBay listing I mentioned:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/USB-3-0-USB-3-Inline-On-Off-Switch-/154368580357

Also, is there any chance such hubs introduce less reliable connection or data transfer? As this audio interface is for recording musical instruments at as low a latency as possible, I wonder if this might have a detrimental effect.
The eBay item will work too but the Hub lets you select what to turn off.

I have one that I use everyday, it's just a Hub with a switch so no problem whatsoever. I even put my USB WiFi on it.
 

TLTH

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The eBay item will work too but the Hub lets you select what to turn off.

I have one that I use everyday, it's just a Hub with a switch so no problem whatsoever. I even put my USB WiFi on it.
Yeah, but I only look for the audio interface to have an on/off option. The thing is that audio recording requires very consistent data transfer, and this is why I don't know whether the hubs might have an effect that is possibly miniscule for other applications but for music recording is a problem.
 

USAFRet

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Yeah, but I only look for the audio interface to have an on/off option. The thing is that audio recording requires very consistent data transfer, and this is why I don't know whether the hubs might have an effect that is possibly miniscule for other applications but for music recording is a problem.
Buy one from somewhere with a strong return policy.
Amazon, 30 days, no questions asked.

Try it....if it fails, return it.
 

TLTH

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Buy one from somewhere with a strong return policy.
Amazon, 30 days, no questions asked.

Try it....if it fails, return it.
I read around and several places where people about this specific utilization of a USB hub said it made issues with audio recording quality.

The issue is also that the interface works data transfer wise under the USB 2 protocol, but for power consumption they recommend to connect it to a USB 3 port. I don't know if USB hubs with several ports that are made to share power from one port on the PC actually send standard voltage per hub port, even when only one port is used.

I don't know if that's actually possible but I just thought on something the disconnects the power within one USB cable, without any data/power rerouting in any way.
 

TLTH

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Thats why I said try it from somewhere with a good return policy.
Rather than fleabay and a listing that states - "Seller does not accept returns "
I'm not from the USA and even though Amazon shipping is quite reliable, ordering from there can take several weeks and then the return process in case it's not good is still a bit of a hassle.

I guess my other option would just be buying a small USB extender and disconnecting from it whenever I shut down the PC. The issue is that I don't want to damage the USB ports on the PC/interface by reconnecting it hundreds of times, so a USB extender—which probably shouldn't introduce any artifacts if it's in the same USB standard as the cable (correct me if I'm mistaken)—is more perishable in case it fails instead of a port.
 

lvt

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A permanent solution is to use a PCI-E to USB 3.0 expansion card (2-port or 4-port).

The card's USB ports are powered only when the PC is running.

You can buy one for the same price of a USB Hub.

 

TLTH

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Or you just use a piece of extension cable that you can manually disconnect.

Yeah, that was my suggestion in my last comment. But is it possible a short additional cable would add an interference to the power delivery or data transfer? I know the added distance is of no issue physically but will the additional connection points create an effect due to perhaps some microcontroller they have there? I don't know exactly how does a USB connection operate and whether the signal is worked on in some manner when it reaches a port.
 

lvt

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Yeah, that was my suggestion in my last comment. But is it possible a short additional cable would add an interference to the power delivery or data transfer? I know the added distance is of no issue physically but will the additional connection points create an effect due to perhaps some microcontroller they have there? I don't know exactly how does a USB connection operate and whether the signal is worked on in some manner when it reaches a port.
There is no micro-controller in an USB cable.

What audio equipment do you have BTW?
 

TLTH

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No problem, you still are within the optimal USB cable length.
OK, so I guess this is my best option.
But what do you think about something like a USB A USB B to USB C adapter? Do they somehow need to "intervene" with the signal which could make it a bad option or it's like the USB extension cords?

Because if I buy something like this:
https://www.aliexpress.com/item/1005002467575639.html

I could just plug the adapter to the Babyface Pro and have a USB C cable go to the USB C port on the back of my PC. Then if I want to turn the device off I can unplug it from the adapter instead of the port itself (although that might still cause some jiggly motion within the interface's USB port which is also something I'm trying to avoid in order to extend the port's life).
 
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lvt

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OK, so I guess this is my best option.
But what do you think about something like a USB A to USB C adapter? Do they somehow need to "intervene" with the signal which could make it a bad option or it's like the USB extension cords?

Because if I buy something like this:
https://www.aliexpress.com/item/1005002467575639.html

I could just plug the adapter to the Babyface Pro and have a USB C cable go to the USB C port on the back of my PC. Then if I want to turn the device off I can unplug it from the adapter instead of the port itself (although that might still cause some jiggly motion within the interface's USB port which is also something I'm trying to avoid in order to extend the port's life).
The data that comes from your audio is digital, regardless how you transfer the data to the PC it will be the same unless you convert it to something else (but it's not the scope of this discussion).

Personally I would use a short extension USB cable with type A as it's more practical, maybe more robust too.
 

TLTH

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The data that comes from your audio is digital, regardless how you transfer the data to the PC it will be the same unless you convert it to something else (but it's not the scope of this discussion).

Personally I would use a short extension USB cable with type A as it's more practical, maybe more robust too.
I know it's digital, but digital signals can still go through detrimental processes depending on how they were handled. So the question was whether a USB A USB B to C adapter should also be completely transparent to the signal?
 
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TLTH

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OK, so I found on AliExpress for a couple of dollars a USB B 2.0 to USB C adapter. Again, I don't know if the adapter can be power capped if it's not up to some standard, so I'm waiting to see whether the seller has answers. But my question now is whether the fact that the USB C port on my PC is 3.2 gen 2, which means it should offer up to 20 volts, could pose a risk when connecting/disconnecting from the audio interface which is always drawing power. The Babyface Pro only calls for 5 volts, so is there any chances for dangerous voltage spikes from a 3.2 gen 2 port across many connections/disconnections?
 

lvt

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OK, so I found on AliExpress for a couple of dollars a USB B 2.0 to USB C adapter. Again, I don't know if the adapter can be power capped if it's not up to some standard, so I'm waiting to see whether the seller has answers. But my question now is whether the fact that the USB C port on my PC is 3.2 gen 2, which means it should offer up to 20 volts, could pose a risk when connecting/disconnecting from the audio interface which is always drawing power. The Babyface Pro only calls for 5 volts, so is there any chances for dangerous voltage spikes from a 3.2 gen 2 port across many connections/disconnections?
The USB C port only delivers what the equipment asks for, your audio device is not capable of using 20V so it won't happen.

But if you are so anxious, stay with regular USB port. The manual says it works fine with USB 2.
 

TLTH

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The USB C port only delivers what the equipment asks for, your audio device is not capable of using 20V so it won't happen.

But if you are so anxious, stay with regular USB port. The manual says it works fine with USB 2.
Yeah, but this is why I'm asking what happens during the moments the cable is plugged in or out, whether is there any chance for an voltage spike? Or it simply won't ask for any electricity until the device already knows that it wants to ask for it at specific rates?

Anyway the company recommends USB 3 for power purposes (although not necessarily the newest version).
 

lvt

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Yeah, but this is why I'm asking what happens during the moments the cable is plugged in or out, whether is there any chance for an voltage spike? Or it simply won't ask for any electricity until the device already knows that it wants to ask for it at specific rates?

Anyway the company recommends USB 3 for power purposes (although not necessarily the newest version).
USB 3.0 (including Type-C) has the same 5V as USB 2.0, only higher power (~1A vs 0.5A)

Only USB C/PD can deliver higher voltage.

Not all motherboards have Type C/PD, you should check with your motherboard's specs.
 

TLTH

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USB 3.0 (including Type-C) has the same 5V as USB 2.0, only higher power (~1A vs 0.5A)

Only USB C/PD can deliver higher voltage.

Not all motherboards have Type C/PD, you should check with your motherboard's specs.
My motherboard is Gigabyte B550 Aorus Pro AC.

From the manual:
"USB Type-C™ Port
The reversible USB port supports the USB 3.2 Gen 2 specification and is compatible to the USB 3.2 Gen 1 and USB 2.0 specification. Use this port for USB devices".

So it is 3.2 Gen 2, which means it should comply to the higher voltage standard. But again, the question is whether that matters.

Although I now look at the exact specs of the motherboard and it says under USB:
"CPU:
  • 3 x USB 3.2 Gen 1 ports on the back panel
  • 1 x USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-A port (red) on the back panel"
That probably doesn't matter much but the direct connection to the CPU should be the most stable with the lowest latency, no? So perhaps I will connect it to one of these 3.2 Gen 1 ports using an A to C cable (with the Babyface Pro having a B to C female adapter as I said). I can't find exact specs, but it is said that 3.2 Gen 1 is basically 3.0 and 3.0 is specified for 5 volts.
 

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