[SOLVED] Access denied to files on internal laptop drive when mounted on desktop

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Commendable
Dec 8, 2016
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They say that the path to hell is paved with good intentions. I was at my elderly neighbors' place and noticed their Asus X555 laptop bulging badly enough that the trackpad had separated from the top cover. I pointed out that it was time for a new battery which they ordered. I replaced it and Windows 10 was glacially, unusably slow. I hated the idea of their shelling out megabucks to Geek Squad (although I actually didn't know how much it would have been). I figured that I could mount the drive on my X99 desktop and have a look at it.

Initially, I could see the various OS folders but wasn't able to get into my neighbor's user folder. This made sense to me. I went into Properties and ran Check Disk more than once along with Optimize. It was late at night but I don't recall it finding any errors. The next morning, I tried booting the laptop and reached the blue screen with the various repair options. None of the non-destructive ones worked. I don't know how Windows was configured, i.e. whether it is or was possible to rollback to a given recovery point.

Since my neighbor uses a minimum of apps, my next thought was to backup just his user folder, reinstall Windows and then copy back his docs. Now I'm getting Access Denied when I try to view the contents of the drive. I've gone to the Security tab in Properties and tried to give myself permission per the attached screenshot.

Windows seems to be applying them to a zillion files including those in the User folder, however, it has thrown out around 40 error messages. I've posted a few examples. Only one was in the User folder. At the end of the process, I still have no access to the contents of the drive.

Is there something obvious that I'm doing wrong?

Thanks for your help.

Max
 

macphoto

Commendable
Dec 8, 2016
7
0
1,510
0
I'm really more of a Mac than a PC user (which probably shows). I'm wondering whether I could get around this permissions issue by mounting the drive externally to my MBP or maybe creating a Linux rescue flash drive.
 
Having run into this problem many times before (and with Windows only allowing you to take ownership of things one at a time), I found the easiest solution was to just use an OS that ignores permissions such as XP.

It's best to copy all the documents to a FAT32 device too, as that effectively strips any permissions attached to the files from them.
 
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macphoto

Commendable
Dec 8, 2016
7
0
1,510
0
You need to invoke "Take Ownership" of those locations.
Which is subtly different that the simple Permissions thing.
You need to invoke "Take Ownership" of those locations.
Which is subtly different that the simple Permissions thing.
Thanks, Titan, that did the trick. This may not have been the most efficient way but it took two steps. First, I made myself the owner of the folder and clicked my way through the error messages (maybe not forty but still quite a few) while Windows did its thing for several minutes. I applied the changes, closed out and restarted. I still didn't have access. Then it occurred to me to add myself as a user with the maximum privileges and went through the routine again. This time, after restarting, I had access.

In the end, I reinstalled Windows and found that the data had been preserved in a dedicated folder for the old installation. So all of this hadn't strictly been necessary. But if the drive had been damaged and needed to be reformatted, I suppose that it would have been.

Thanks again.
 

macphoto

Commendable
Dec 8, 2016
7
0
1,510
0
Having run into this problem many times before (and with Windows only allowing you to take ownership of things one at a time), I found the easiest solution was to just use an OS that ignores permissions such as XP.

It's best to copy all the documents to a FAT32 device too, as that effectively strips any permissions attached to the files from them.
Good to know. I'll keep this in mind in the future.
 

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