Question Accidentally increased voltage to my laptop. Did I damage it?

csaxon

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Jun 5, 2018
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My inspiron 7567 (i7 7700HQ), has been having overheating issues which I can decrease by undervolting the CPU to -0.110mv.

Last night when I entered the value in again and then left the laptop on idle overnight so make sure that no BSOD appeared.

When I came up the next morning the idle temperature was 50C which was a little high, so I checked XTU program and I accidentally overvolted (+0.110mv) not undervolted. I checked what the max temp the laptop had reached overnight and it was 81C as it had done it's scheduled virus scan and maintenance.

I am now really worried that, I may have damaged something with the increased voltage. Could I have?
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Check the applicable temperature and voltage ranges.

Even if high they may have been within allowed limits and all could be well.

And if they did go out of spec there may have been some damage but not enough to disable or otherwise break the laptop.

Could cause a failure if exceeded again. No way to really know.
 
My inspiron 7567 (i7 7700HQ), has been having overheating issues which I can decrease by undervolting the CPU to -0.110mv.

Last night when I entered the value in again and then left the laptop on idle overnight so make sure that no BSOD appeared.

When I came up the next morning the idle temperature was 50C which was a little high, so I checked XTU program and I accidentally overvolted (+0.110mv) not undervolted. I checked what the max temp the laptop had reached overnight and it was 81C as it had done it's scheduled virus scan and maintenance.

I am now really worried that, I may have damaged something with the increased voltage. Could I have?
I can't imagine only 110mV could have stressed the part excessively. Most laptop CPU's are based on desktop CPU silicon but optimized for lower power consumption in their application. In otherwords: it's the desire for lower power consumption that dictates the lower voltages they operate at, not the silicon's safety.

The more important thing is temperature since laptops don't have adequate cooling under the best of conditions. I don't know Intel parts very well, but I can't believe 81C is going to be damaging either since most modern silicon can easily handle upwards of 100-110C without damage (although stability is another matter).

But like that, it's obvious that battery life will be bad... and setting it on a lap may not be an option :)

EDIT: consulting Intel's spec. for the part, Tjunction is 100C so 81C is perfectly safe.
 

FullTank

Reputable
Apr 7, 2015
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No you did not damaged laptop in any way, as user above said, the critical temp for a laptop is 100-110, and even then the throttling would hit in, which would protect the laptop from self damage. :)
 

csaxon

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Jun 5, 2018
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I started undervolting because temps kept reaching 100C under load, so definitely not going to deliberately over-volt. I was just worried that the extra voltage might of damaged something (when I'm already having major laptop issues)
 

zx128k

Upstanding
Nov 23, 2019
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Takes awhile to degrade a CPU. You have to put silly voltage into it and then load the CPU to degrade it quickly and/or kill the cpu outright. The voltage has to be really very silly to degrade or kill the cpu by just having that voltage set. So there is a good chance you will be okay.

You will need to replace the thermal paste (clean out all the dust) to fix your overheating issues and hopefully avoid touching the vcore at all.
 

csaxon

Prominent
Jun 5, 2018
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Takes awhile to degrade a CPU. You have to put silly voltage into it and then load the CPU to degrade it quickly and/or kill the cpu outright. The voltage has to be really very silly to degrade or kill the cpu by just having that voltage set. So there is a good chance you will be okay.

You will need to replace the thermal paste (clean out all the dust) to fix your overheating issues and hopefully avoid touching the vcore at all.
I'm having the thermal paste done tomorrow, although the technician doubts that's the cause. What do you mean by avoiding the vcore?
 

zx128k

Upstanding
Nov 23, 2019
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I'm having the thermal paste done tomorrow, although the technician doubts that's the cause. What do you mean by avoiding the vcore?
If you are overheating most of the time with laptops its dust related. If you can get the temps under control then you won't have to lower vcore.
 

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