Acclerated speed of precessor and as a result of that. speed of fan

Tariq01

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Oct 14, 2011
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Hello,I have Dell GX620 pc having 3.6GB processor 1 GB Ram.Ihave upgraded my hard drive 500GB.I have widows 7 64bits.The problem is the processor works at 100% speed which make the fan to run faster. A noise is created.I fear it will damage the processor or the other part of computer.Please help me in this regard.Note when I install Widows xp and 40 GB Ram the pc work normally.is Windows 764bits incompatible or WD 500GB hard drive.Please help meI am waiting anxiously.Tariq
 
That's an old computer. Also what do you mean the processor runs at 100% speed? Do you mean when your playing games using some other program? Or does it work at 100% speed doing nothing?

If your doing nothing and your CPU is at 100% - most likely you have a virus. Also have you checked your task manager and the performance tab?

Sounds like your Heat sink might be getting cruddy. Shut off your computer, open up the case, and carefully use a vacuum to suck up and dust bunnies and grime and gunk.

You could also probably take off your heat sink and re-apply thermal paste. You will need some thermal paste though (which im guessing you don't have).
 

Energy96

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OMG.

DON'T EVER USE A VACUUM IN A PC!!!!!!!!!!

Using a vacuum in a PC is like setting off a massive ESD storm inside your PC, if you don't kill anything on contact at the very least you will cause components to degrade and shortening their lifespan. It's worse than dragging a cat across your carpet and then shoving it inside your case.


Use compressed air in a can or other such device to blow it out safely.
 
Uhh I use a plastic/rubber hose. So there is no issue with static. Also - i've used it many many times - and NEVER EVER HAD A PROBLEM USING A VACUUM.

Who told you to never use a vacuum? Whoever it was, is wrong. So don't comment with ridiculous out of this world thoughts.

You just have to be careful when using the vacuum not to damage components (also, you have to make sure you disconnect your computer).
 

bwhiten

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Vacuum hoses, especially insulating varieties, generate more static than a metal one would. You need to read more about it. Just because you have had no problem YET, doesn't mean you wont in the future or that you have not already damaged something, just not to the point you've noticed. Research it.
 
Ok I don't know where you guys live, or what kind of junk is sitting in your computers, but using a vacuum is fine.

By the way, using compressed air is not good either. It actually compacts the dust into corners which can cause over heating.

Oh well i'm done here. Good luck.
 

Energy96

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You are grossly misinformed and I really suggest you read up on the subject matter.

Plastic hoses? You realize carpet is also made of essentially plastic right? yet it is one of the largest sources of ESD in a home. Something doesn't have to be metal in order to create ESD, in fact many of the biggest sources are not made of metal. It would actually be better to use a metal hose that is grounded than a plastic one.

You could probably somewhat safely vacuum the fans and or filters of a PC case fairly safely if you were extremely cautious but I would not recommend putting a vacuum anywhere near the inside of a PC case. I saw a video on youtube a few years back that was taken in a pitch black room of what is happening when you use a vacuum and it looked like a mini elecrical storm all over the area near the end of the hose.

You have either been EXTREMELY lucky, and possibly live in a very humid environment which will help a little, or you haven't kept a PC long enough for it to degrade.
 

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