Acer Nitro 50 Desktop Review: Budget Gaming With Compromises

Th_Redman

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Why are almost every pre-built desktop computer containing such a crap power supply? Wouldn't it be more practical and attractive to the consumer to include a Tier 1 PSU?
 

arajigar

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I think that this PC is an insult. No rear fan included?, for all gods new and old´s sake. And TH_REDMAN´s right, that PSU does not look any good, overall if it must give power to that GPU. Also the case is uglier than the back of a fridge... i´ll pay 500€, no more, and then I´ll put all the useful hardware on a true PC chasis, because..yuck, this one suck b***s!!!
 

Because the average consumer buying a pre-built system doesn't care about the power supply. If one company is putting a $100 PSU in their system, then their competitors will use a $30 PSU, and either put the money saved toward components that make their system perform better, or simply sell their PC for less, while making the same profit.

And for the most part, these lower-end PSUs will work just fine. In the example of this system, a 65 watt TDP processor and 120 watt graphics card are not going to be pushing this PSU to its limits, and I would be surprised if the power draw ever reached much more than half its stated capacity.

As for the rest of the system though, it seems a bit overpriced for what you get. Initially, I read the specs and thought it might actually be pretty decent for $800. Then I read the part about it being $1200 as configured. : | For $1200, a gaming desktop should arguably have 16GB of RAM and an SSD in place of that Optane cache, or a better graphics card than a 1060. The i7 also seems like a bit of a waste when paired with a mid-range card like that, and something like an i5-8400 or Ryzen 2600 would have allowed them to improve other components that would have more of an impact on gaming performance. Self-building a system, you could do a lot more for $1200, such as something along these lines...

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 2600 3.4GHz 6-Core Processor ($160.98 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: ARCTIC - Freezer 33 eSports ONE (Black/White) CPU Cooler ($31.81 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock - B450 Pro4 ATX AM4 Motherboard ($69.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill - Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($139.89 @ OutletPC)
Storage: Samsung - 860 Evo 500GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($86.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate - Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($58.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Video Card: MSI - GeForce GTX 1080 8GB DUKE OC Video Card ($474.98 @ Newegg)
Case: Thermaltake - Core G21 Tempered Glass Edition ATX Mid Tower Case ($29.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: EVGA - SuperNOVA G3 650W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($59.77 @ B&H)
Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit ($94.89 @ OutletPC)
Total: $1208.28
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-10-11 23:25 EDT-0400

So, for someone willing to shop around online and spend a day putting a system together themselves, for roughly the same price after rebates, nearly everything is significantly improved, aside from perhaps the processor. The Ryzen 2600 is on sale for about half the price of an i7-8700 though, has the same number of cores and threads, and can be overclocked, albeit not quite to the 8700's performance level. With the limited cooling in that reviewed system, that 8700 might have trouble maintaining its maximum boost clocks though, and ultimately either of these CPUs should handle games quite well. There's also a tower cooler to keep the overclocked processor running quietly, and a B450 motherboard that should allow for some overclocking. Then, there's 16GB of DDR4-3200 RAM, which is double the amount in the reviewed system, and more than 8GB will likely be necessary for smoothly running some games within the next couple years. For storage, the hard drive capacity has been doubled to 2TB, and a 500 GB SSD should allow for a more responsive system and faster loading of games installed to it. Then, perhaps most noteworthy in terms of performance gains, there's a GTX 1080 with a triple-fan cooler, which should be able to push far higher frame rates than a 1060, especially at resolutions above 1080p. At the moment, the case is quite cheap after rebate, and even has tempered glass and a reasonably nice looking interior, though any inexpensive case would likely be at least as good as the one in the review here. The power supply is also notably better, with a higher capacity and 80+ Gold efficiency.

The reviewed system is decidedly "mid-range" as configured, while it's possible to get gaming performance that would be considered "high-end" for about the same amount of money when building a system yourself.
 

Olle P

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What Cryoburner said. No targeted customer gives a sh*t about the PSU.

There's a fan in the PSU. Will be sufficient to provide an airflow.

As typical for these pre-built computers it's off balanced and not optimised to actually provide good performance for the money. It's optimised for marketing buzz words ("Optane", "Core i7", ...)
The tested setup is the top of that line, and the only version with GTX 1060. Next step down is RX 580 (4GB) and no Optane, which just makes it even more off balance as a gaming computer.
Much better pairing the GTX 1060 with a Core i5 (or Ryzen 5 2600), 2x4GB RAM and a 1TB SSHD while removing the Optane memory.
 

Kridian

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And it'll be a rude awakening after their box melts due to a crappy PSU. It's like the ONE THING not to skimp on!
 

arajigar

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There's a fan in the PSU. Will be sufficient to provide an airflow.
O-o-o-o-o-oh, man, It´s evident that or you use liquid cooling or you have not build so many PCs. Excuse me, but 1 rear fan is a MUST if you don´t want temps skyrocket, even very basic builts of 1999 needed that. Also, the PSU fan will, and not be, EVER a valid exhaust for the PC case, read about it. I am sure that your intentions saying that are not bad in any manner, but inaccuracy will lead to trouble. ;)
 

Olle P

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Are you totally unaware that the original ATX standard from Intel (see below) stipulated that the PSU should be used to evcuate the air?
Given that the PSU is designed for the task and has a sufficiently powerful fan that isn't slowed down to a bare minimum all the time it will be sufficient (and noisy). Been there and done that!
The thermals were okay, but the noise very annoying.

Intel ATX PSU design guide (version 0.9, 1998):
4.3 Airflow / Fan
In general, exhausting air from the chassis enclosure via a power supply fan at the rear panel is the preferred system-level airflow solution. ...
It is suggested that an 80 mm ball bearing fan be used in conjunction with a thermally sensitive fan speed control circuit to balance system-level thermal and acoustic performance. ...
 

arajigar

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Are you totally unaware that the original ATX standard from Intel (see below) stipulated that the PSU should be used to evcuate the air?
Given that the PSU is designed for the task and has a sufficiently powerful fan that isn't slowed down to a bare minimum all the time it will be sufficient (and noisy). Been there and done that!
The thermals were okay, but the noise very annoying.
Yes, what times those when the upper mounter PSU takes hot air from the inside of the case!! those ovens called Athlon brought summertime to your room on winter afternoons, awww.

I am sure Intel is aware of how actually almost NONE of the cases have the PSU mounted on top of the case. :D

Anyway, I am sure a simple 120 mm fan counld do better cooling than the PSU fan.
 

Olle P

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The 50W Athlon didn't add more heat than what a Core i3 will provide today.

The PSU does have a 12 cm fan so that point is covered!
What I see as a real cooling problem is the open grill for a fan below the PSU. There this computer will probably get a loop of air passing through the PSU over and over again not contributing to flow in the lower parts of the case. Closing that grill should improve cooling.
 

arajigar

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Oh, Athlons are Hot as a pole dancer, my dear friend XD, They need a good airflow design to not reach 70 degrees celsius on high loads (map compiling, for example, it takes hours using 100% of the CPU horsepower).

But...You´re 100% right. So right Olle!! I guess if a Intake 120 mm should add fresh air there and force, repeat FORCE the direction of the airflow.
 

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