Question Adaptive/offset voltage mode

Corgoi

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Apr 12, 2019
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So basically if I set voltage mode to Adaptive, is the voltage going to go up and down based on the cpu load, but never go above the vCore - is that right?

Also, my understanding of Offset mode is this:
The vCore is going to be the maximum load voltage (as in the case of adaptive mode) and the offset would be the maximum voltage it can substract from the vcore in case of low-load consitions.
So for example if vCore is 1.35 and offset is .05 then the idle voltage would be 1.30 and full load 1.35 right?

I'm asking that about the offset mode since from what I've read it seems to be like this:
You set the vcore, which is gonna be the maximum voltage, and it's gonna be like and adaptive mode, but the offset always substracts that value from the voltage, so basically the voltage is ALWAYS lower than the cpu thinks it should be, based on the load, which makes no sense to me and seems like the most unuseful thing in the world, why would you use a voltage thay is smaller than it should be and can cause unstability?

I know I'm not getting this right, I'd like a more detailed explanation of these voltage modes
 
"Your CPU will request some voltage from the motherboard. That voltage is called "VID" and let's say it is between 0.9 (idle) and 1.15 V (max turbo). Offset mode adds a flat amount of voltage to the entire range. If you put a +0.20 V offset into your BIOS, the motherboard will supply VID + 0.20 V to the CPU, meaning 1.1 to 1.35 V in our little example. Adaptive I am less sure about, but I think it gives you a linear correlation between idle VID and max boost VID, which you set manually. You could set your motherboard to have 1.35 V max boost voltage in adaptive mode and it'd supply 0.9 V (= default VID) while the CPU idles and 1.35 V at max boost clocks (after OC). I'm assuming it is linear because it'd explain certain stability issues that occur when using adaptive mode only, simply because the voltage requirements for the CPU are not linear functions of the frequency.

Here are a couple of glorious paint illustrations:

  • manual mode
  • offset mode
  • adaptive mode [Note: Default VID does not necessarily have to be a simple exponential function the way I drew it here. It might have irregularities which cause adaptive mode to drop below VID or the stable voltage at that frequency in certain sections of the function, causing to the instabilities experienced when working with adaptive mode.]"
 

Corgoi

Great
Apr 12, 2019
139
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"Your CPU will request some voltage from the motherboard. That voltage is called "VID" and let's say it is between 0.9 (idle) and 1.15 V (max turbo). Offset mode adds a flat amount of voltage to the entire range. If you put a +0.20 V offset into your BIOS, the motherboard will supply VID + 0.20 V to the CPU, meaning 1.1 to 1.35 V in our little example. Adaptive I am less sure about, but I think it gives you a linear correlation between idle VID and max boost VID, which you set manually. You could set your motherboard to have 1.35 V max boost voltage in adaptive mode and it'd supply 0.9 V (= default VID) while the CPU idles and 1.35 V at max boost clocks (after OC). I'm assuming it is linear because it'd explain certain stability issues that occur when using adaptive mode only, simply because the voltage requirements for the CPU are not linear functions of the frequency.

Here are a couple of glorious paint illustrations:

  • manual mode
  • offset mode
  • adaptive mode [Note: Default VID does not necessarily have to be a simple exponential function the way I drew it here. It might have irregularities which cause adaptive mode to drop below VID or the stable voltage at that frequency in certain sections of the function, causing to the instabilities experienced when working with adaptive mode.]"
Thanks, but i'm still not sure about the offset mode

So for example if the VID it's 1.15v and you want it to be 1.35v then why set a .2v offset when you can just set the VID to 1.35v in another mode lol
 

Corgoi

Great
Apr 12, 2019
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Offset is simple, if you set voltage to 1.2V and offset to 0.5v, the CPU with EIST and other functions can do 0.7V without load and 1.7V on load.
View: http://i.imgur.com/fLydiRW.png

View: http://i.imgur.com/RuUNzGj.png

View: http://i.imgur.com/03HTWvd.png

These pictures explain pretty well tho.
I still don't get it with the offset mode I might be an idiot

let me do a big recap tell me if I got this straight

So the Vcore setting in the bios is actually not Vcore, its the vid, which is the desired voltage for the cpu
And the actual vcore is the real voltage you get at a certain point

On manual mode, the vcore will always be equal to the vid (at least theoretically)

On adaptive mde, the vcore will change depemding on the load but never be higher than the vid

On offset mode, there's a negative and positive offset. The vcore is also gonna be adaptive but it's gonna stay between the 'vid-negative offset' and 'vid+positive offset' numbers, depending on the load.

But, your offset mode picture doesn't show that. It shows that there's only one offset value (positive) , the vid is adaptive, and the vcore is always bigger than the vid with the amount of volts you set as offset

So, specifically in ypur graph's case:
The idle vid is .9, but you wish it would be 1.1v, so you add .2 offset
But my question is. WHY would you do that when you can just set the vid to 1.1v? That makes no sense to me and that's why I think the graph is not correct


So is that all right?
 
You're not, Even tho I clearly do not understand it.
Offset might be only good when you finish overclocking via manual mode, you know the voltage and the VID will change as you enable the EIST since I do not have it enabled.
Offset might does same as default. Follows the voltage of the VID of the chip depending on load and the increased +/- or decreased voltage upon your selected voltage from the manual overclock voltage.
 

Corgoi

Great
Apr 12, 2019
139
2
85
0
You're not, Even tho I clearly do not understand it.
Offset might be only good when you finish overclocking via manual mode, you know the voltage and the VID will change as you enable the EIST since I do not have it enabled.
Offset might does same as default. Follows the voltage of the VID of the chip depending on load and the increased +/- or decreased voltage upon your selected voltage from the manual overclock voltage.
Yeah that's what I was thinking aswell. Overclocking via manual mode and then setting offsets
Anyways, thanks a lot for the answers!
 
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