News Adata Teams Up with Gigabyte & MSI for 64GB DDR5-8400 Memory Modules

hannibal

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Intel market share is still 80% vs 20% of AMD, so memory makers will tune their new memory first to Intel platforms. But amd 20% is still big enough that memory makers are also interested in getting to AMD rigs. But the pure mass of Intel makes it so that they will get the first dip, even AMD is leading in the technology wise at this moment.
The transition is easy to both. They both need new platform for ddr5, so no difference in there. in AMD platform the infinity cache speed ratio vs memory speed still remains to be important. So the best memory speed is one that is near 1800 Mhz to 2000 Mhz internally. Because ddr4 is douple rate the "good" amd memory for current platform is 3600 to 4000 (douple the io speed speed)

NamesMemory clockI/O bus clockTransfer rateTheoretical bandwidth
DDR-200, PC-1600100 MHz100 MHz200 MT/s1.6 GB/s
DDR-400, PC-3200200 MHz200 MHz400 MT/s3.2 GB/s
DDR2-800, PC2-6400200 MHz400 MHz800 MT/s6.4 GB/s
DDR3-1600, PC3-12800200 MHz800 MHz1600 MT/s12.8 GB/s
DDR4-2400, PC4-19200300 MHz1200 MHz2400 MT/s19.2 GB/s
DDR4-3200, PC4-25600400 MHz1600 MHz3200 MT/s25.6 GB/s
DDR5-4800, PC5-38400300 MHz2400 MHz4800 MT/s38.4 GB/s
DDR5-6400, PC5-51200400 MHz3200 MHz6400 MT/s51.2 GB/s

So good ddr5 to amd are about ddr5 7200 to ddr5 8000 range. That means also that first ddr5 4800 are no good for amd zen prosessors! You need to have higher end variants. At least ddr 6400 before it start to get even with ddr4 platform that can run infinity cache at higher speed.
 
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salgado18

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Sounds very good on paper, but it's been a long while since CPUs were bottlenecked by RAM. The real world benefit of going from DDR4-2666 to DDR4-4000 (a 50% increase) is around 10% in the best cases. I like fast RAM? Definitely, but I hope it doesn't lead to unnecessary cost increases, since the benefit is hardly there.
 

gg83

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Jul 10, 2015
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Sounds very good on paper, but it's been a long while since CPUs were bottlenecked by RAM. The real world benefit of going from DDR4-2666 to DDR4-4000 (a 50% increase) is around 10% in the best cases. I like fast RAM? Definitely, but I hope it doesn't lead to unnecessary cost increases, since the benefit is hardly there.
Thats exactly what I was just thinking. Nobody recommends more than 16gb at normal speeds for the average user. Will software have to change in order to utilize the speed and bandwidth?
 
The real world benefit of going from DDR4-2666 to DDR4-4000 (a 50% increase) is around 10% in the best cases.
People get all giddy about MHz and MT/s, but forget to take CAS latency into the equation. Sure, it still doesn't relate 1:1 with real-world performance, but:
  • DDR4-2400, CAS 16 = 13.33ns latency
  • DDR4-3600, CAS 18 = 10ns latency
Aside from the 50% transfer rate increase, the actual latency only improves by 33%. In the real world, yes, the actual performance difference is far below 10%.
Getting past my level of knowledge, but as I understand, you're not throwing a bit of data into system RAM and then retrieving it immediately. That stuff should be caught in the CPU cache(s). This is further exacerbated by multi-threaded workloads where waiting on one specific RAM call doesn't stall the whole pipeline.
 

dan1991Ro

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Oct 1, 2019
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Let me ask you guys a few questions.
1.If the density is increased,does that mean you could get a 32 GB set for cheaper than right now?Does it mean we will have more dram at a lower price or not?
2.Will a single 16 gb ddr5 stick be equal to 2x8 ddr4 ram?(they say its supposed to be split in half ?,2 channels per stick,i dont really understand thatm sorry if my question is bad)
3.Will increased dram density or whatever they call it mean that phone ram will increase because they can cram more of it in,less space concerns?And 6-8-12 Gb ram for phones will become the standard?
 

Jesse_20

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Dec 11, 2015
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Let me ask you guys a few questions.
1.If the density is increased,does that mean you could get a 32 GB set for cheaper than right now?Does it mean we will have more dram at a lower price or not?
2.Will a single 16 gb ddr5 stick be equal to 2x8 ddr4 ram?(they say its supposed to be split in half ?,2 channels per stick,i dont really understand thatm sorry if my question is bad)
3.Will increased dram density or whatever they call it mean that phone ram will increase because they can cram more of it in,less space concerns?And 6-8-12 Gb ram for phones will become the standard?
  1. Density does not really impact price/GB. It's simply how much you can fit on a single chip.
  2. Depends on what you are measuring. 16GB of DDR4 will hold the same amount of data that 16GB of DDR5 will hold. In that respect, they are equal. As for speed, DDR5 is going to be much faster transferring that data in and out of the memory chip. In this respect, DDR5 is better.
DDR5 will likely cost more than DR4, so in this respect, DDR4 will be better. Ultimately, your system will be designed to use one or the other, but not both. Older systems will stay with DDR4 (or DDR3/2 if old enough), or use DDR5 for the brand new chipsets and processors coming out next year.
3) The memory talked about here is for desktop and laptop computers, and does not correlate to phone memory at all. They are entirely different beasts. Phone memory is more like a usb flash drive/SSD/NVME/HDD than a DDR4 (or 5) stick of Ram in that it "Stores" information even if the device is turned off, whereas DDR4 and DDR5 loses all data in them if the power is cut. You will see larger capacity storage in phones eventually, but that cannot be derived from this article.