Build Advice Advice on building a new system ?

Zork283

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I am designing a new PC with a $4000 budget. I was saving for over a year for the new Zen4 CPUs, but it seems the Intel outperforms it.
I want a system that will be upgradable and still be decent in 7 years. The plan is to order most of the parts on either Black Friday or Cyber Monday except for the GPU, which doesn't come out until December.
I am looking for some feedback on this build:

https://pcpartpicker.com/list/YJhPH2

CPU: Intel Core i9-13900K 3 GHz 24-Core Processor
CPU Cooler: ARCTIC Liquid Freezer II 420 RGB 68.9 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler
Motherboard: Asus ROG STRIX Z790-F GAMING WIFI ATX LGA1700 Motherboard
RAM: G.Skill Ripjaws S5 64 GB (2 x 32 GB) DDR5-5600 CL28 Memory
GPU: RX 7900 XTX
Storage: Samsung 990 Pro 2 TB M.2-2280 PCIe 4.0 X4 NVME Solid State Drive
PSU: SeaSonic PRIME TX-1000 1000 W 80+ Titanium Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply
Case: Fractal Design Define 7 ATX Mid Tower Case

I want to either get the best RAM that the system can handle. 64GB is very overkill for my needs. However, the 32GB DIMMs seem to mostly come in pairs, and the ones that are listed single in pcpartpicker have higher First Word Latencies and CAS Latiencies. I want to be able to eventually upgrade this to 128GB of the best ram. So my question here is: Are these 10ns latencies and timings the best that can come out with DDR5 and work with a i9-13900K? I think the only alternative would be to get 16GB DIMMs and then discard them in a few years when there is better/cheaper ram.

I am not going to overclock, and think cooling is very important to maintain the lifespan of these components. Also, the new CPUs are limited by thermals, so I wanted the best cooler. I chose the case for cooling and for having good expandability. I am not well versed on cases, so please feel free to point out any issues with my choice. I am going from a Thermaltake V3 Black Edition which is already large and this new case is sigificantly larger than that.
I threw in an optical drive just so that I can access software on disks. I just used a CD a few hours ago to install a printer driver so I still find some use from being able to access them.

I think that at some point I may add a USB PCIe card to the PCIe x 1 slot. Also, there are no PCIe Gen 5 GPUs so should I just leave that slot empty until one comes out? If that is the case then maybe I should just skimp on the GPU and just get something to hold me over for a couple of years and then get the GPU for the PCIe Gen 5 slot. I could just get a RX 6700, RX 6700XT or maybe a A770. I just don't want to spend $1000 on a component that will be replaced in 2 or 3 years. My current system has a 980Ti so anything will be a huge upgrade for me.

I chose a PSU larger than I need to provide headroom for future upgrades.

Is this an optimal build? This is only my second time building a PC, so any thoughts, suggestions and feedback would be appreciated.
 
Primary purpose of this PC is what?

Secondary or tertiary purpose?

I assume you want to spend 4K now and are willing to upgrade repeatedly over the next 7 years, rather than buy a set of parts and don't change those parts for 7 years unless they fail. Am I wrong?
 
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Zork283

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Primary purpose of this PC is what?

Secondary or tertiary purpose?
This is a replacement for my primary PC. I use it for gaming, but I don't typically use the high settings, and I currently only have 1080p 60Hz monitors, though I wil . I have been putting off upgrading for years and have been saving money. It is long past due to be replaced, and I was waiting over a year for the Zen4 CPUs. The three biggest performance problems I have at the moment are : 1. I am getting crashes and the minidump says MEMORY_CORRUPTOR: ONE_BIT so I think my aging memory is the cause 2.that my 8 year old PC doesn't run Elite Dangerous Odyssey well. and 3. I have started experimenting with The Bibites (artifical life with neural network brains that are trained via NEAT) and would like to be able to run the simulation at larger scales and higher speeds. however, The Bibites do not at this time make much use of the GPU, so I am willing to wait a few years before buying a big GPU. Also, I would like a more energy efficient system and newer chips have much better performance per watt. It is my understanding that more cooling results in better performance per watt.

Basically, the reason I am willing to spend so much now is that I want this new computer to last for many years without having to upgrade again. I am also going to add components to it over time (more SSDs mostly SATA, so I don't require all the m.2 slots that come with the motherboard). I already have a 4TB Sata SSD that I am going to add more too it. I am much less concerned with optimizing performance now as I am with having a system that can be upgraded over the years. In my old computer, I started with a basic GPU and then a few years later bought a 980TI for it. I also added RAM over its lifespan, but I had to keep buying the same type of RAM I started with or I would have to replace the RAM I already had bought.

Speaking of the motherboard, I got an Asus sabertooth Z97 Mk2 motherboard 8 years ago and I just want something with that has as much reliability , durability, build quality, and expandibility as that. I started with 8Gb of ram, and now have 32. With various upgrades I was able to keep this PC going strong for all this time.
 

Zerk2012

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I am designing a new PC with a $4000 budget. I was saving for over a year for the new Zen4 CPUs, but it seems the Intel outperforms it.
I want a system that will be upgradable and still be decent in 7 years. The plan is to order most of the parts on either Black Friday or Cyber Monday except for the GPU, which doesn't come out until December.
I am looking for some feedback on this build:

https://pcpartpicker.com/list/YJhPH2

CPU: Intel Core i9-13900K 3 GHz 24-Core Processor
CPU Cooler: ARCTIC Liquid Freezer II 420 RGB 68.9 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler
Motherboard: Asus ROG STRIX Z790-F GAMING WIFI ATX LGA1700 Motherboard
RAM: G.Skill Ripjaws S5 64 GB (2 x 32 GB) DDR5-5600 CL28 Memory
GPU: RX 7900 XTX
Storage: Samsung 990 Pro 2 TB M.2-2280 PCIe 4.0 X4 NVME Solid State Drive
PSU: SeaSonic PRIME TX-1000 1000 W 80+ Titanium Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply
Case: Fractal Design Define 7 ATX Mid Tower Case

I want to either get the best RAM that the system can handle. 64GB is very overkill for my needs. However, the 32GB DIMMs seem to mostly come in pairs, and the ones that are listed single in pcpartpicker have higher First Word Latencies and CAS Latiencies. I want to be able to eventually upgrade this to 128GB of the best ram. So my question here is: Are these 10ns latencies and timings the best that can come out with DDR5 and work with a i9-13900K? I think the only alternative would be to get 16GB DIMMs and then discard them in a few years when there is better/cheaper ram.

I am not going to overclock, and think cooling is very important to maintain the lifespan of these components. Also, the new CPUs are limited by thermals, so I wanted the best cooler. I chose the case for cooling and for having good expandability. I am not well versed on cases, so please feel free to point out any issues with my choice. I am going from a Thermaltake V3 Black Edition which is already large and this new case is sigificantly larger than that.
I threw in an optical drive just so that I can access software on disks. I just used a CD a few hours ago to install a printer driver so I still find some use from being able to access them.

I think that at some point I may add a USB PCIe card to the PCIe x 1 slot. Also, there are no PCIe Gen 5 GPUs so should I just leave that slot empty until one comes out? If that is the case then maybe I should just skimp on the GPU and just get something to hold me over for a couple of years and then get the GPU for the PCIe Gen 5 slot. I could just get a RX 6700, RX 6700XT or maybe a A770. I just don't want to spend $1000 on a component that will be replaced in 2 or 3 years. My current system has a 980Ti so anything will be a huge upgrade for me.

I chose a PSU larger than I need to provide headroom for future upgrades.

Is this an optimal build? This is only my second time building a PC, so any thoughts, suggestions and feedback would be appreciated.
You could of got the printer driver online I haven't used a DVD drive in a few years.

The case need to have much better airflow (mesh front) for the high end parts your using.

The video card has not been released so no benchmarks yet don't get stuck on that.

You can get a good PSU for less and the same with the M.2 drive.

OK for your use your spending about double what you need to spend, anything you buy today will be outdated in a few years. 1080p monitor look for a nice RTC 3070ti it should last some time, 13700K, 32GB of memory.
 
Basically, the reason I am willing to spend so much now is that I want this new computer to last for many years without having to upgrade again. I am also going to add components to it over time
Hmmmm........

You want it to last many years without upgrading...............but you are going to add components over time.

At some point, those 2 things become contradictory.

Assuming motherboard and CPU do NOT fail within your stated 7 years, is it your intent to NOT change them during that time period?

Or are you willing to change motherboard/CPU say every 2 or 3 years?

I don't know to what degree your anticipated work load is CPU horsepower dependent, but staying anywhere near the leading edge is going to be difficult if you don't change CPU and quite possibly motherboard. Sockets change. The fact that you want to spend 4K now implies you want to be near the leading edge.

One idea:

Spend maybe 3K now, not 4K.

Put the saved 1K in your pocket. Re-evaluate your position in 2 or 3 years and reach for the 1K at that time if unhappy.

That might enable you to stay in the upper reaches for a longer time and help you avoid the law of diminishing returns.....you might not get much additional benefit right now by spending 4K rather than 3K.
 
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Zork283

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Hmmmm........

You want it to last many years without upgrading...............but you are going to add components over time.

At some point, those 2 things become contradictory.
I meant without upgrading the CPU/Motherboard. I was planning on not doing much except upgrading the GPU and only installing new RAM and hard drives.

After speaking with a friend I managed to get the cost down. I also switched to the Ryzen9 7950X because it is on sale
https://pcpartpicker.com/list/3xC6Fg

My plan is still to put the RX 7900 XTX GPU in it so that will add $1k to the price, which would bring it to 3k.
I really like the powersupply and the more efficient titanium power supply will actually pay for itself in saved electricity. Also SeaSonic PSUs are very reliable.
 
I meant without upgrading the CPU/Motherboard. I was planning on not doing much except upgrading the GPU and only installing new RAM and hard drives.


I really like the powersupply and the more efficient titanium power supply will actually pay for itself in saved electricity. Also SeaSonic PSUs are very reliable.
I would be cautious about buying a new board and new RAM now and then later on adding more new RAM, rather than total replacement of all RAM. Not sure if that's what you mean.

Yeah Seasonic power supplies are typically quite reliable.

Using your local power rates per KWH, have you done the calculation of how much money Titanium would save you in a year...based on how many hours you operate and at what load in a year and the difference in efficiency between Titanium, Platinum, and Gold?

I have no idea about your power rates. Mine are around 17 cents per KWH, year round average.
 

Zork283

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I would be cautious about buying a new board and new RAM now and then later on adding more new RAM, rather than total replacement of all RAM. Not sure if that's what you mean.

Yeah Seasonic power supplies are typically quite reliable.

Using your local power rates per KWH, have you done the calculation of how much money Titanium would save you in a year...based on how many hours you operate and at what load in a year and the difference in efficiency between Titanium, Platinum, and Gold?

I have no idea about your power rates. Mine are around 17 cents per KWH, year round average.
Titanium would save me around $13 per year over gold, which over 8 years comes to $105. As for adding new RAM later, I will make sure it is the same make and model as what I am getting now.
 

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