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Question Advice on external hard drive after bad experience

britpoprule

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Jul 5, 2015
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Hi everybody,
I wanted to ask for advice about the purchase of a new external hard drive. Coming from the bad experience of an external hard drive that died because the platter got scratched by the head, after a fall), I wanted to ask if there are external hard drives with a different system, (for example like the internal SSD drives on my macbook pro, which I guess wouldn't have that problem).
Thanks a lot.
 
Jul 9, 2019
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First of all , external hard drives are just like normal HDDs and you need to be little more carefull with them . But , good option is too buy an SSD and SATA to USB adapter .
 
Jul 9, 2019
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Well I say its safer but not better if you dont have usb 3.0 port or if you dont get SATA to USB 3.0 mainly because of perfomance and speed . Also SSD is 2.5" and quite thin so its going to be very portable as well
 
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britpoprule

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Well I say its safer but not better if you dont have usb 3.0 port or if you dont get SATA to USB 3.0 mainly because of perfomance and speed . Also SSD is 2.5" and quite thin so its going to be very portable as well
You suggest to buy an internal SSD drive and then use an adapter.
Is it cheaper than buying an external SSD drive?
 

Satan-IR

Honorable
SSDs have no mechanical/moving parts and are less prone to damage from a fall.

There are external SSDs too and depending on on how much you want to spend there are different capacities. They don't require an adapter. You would need to buy an adapter if you get a regular SATA SSD and want to connect it via USB.

Although you'd be limited to the speed of the USB bus and can't really benefit SSD speeds with them on all machines/devices for example those that have USB 2.0 support.

Unless you can get models that support USB 3 or 3.1 (gen. 2) or Thunderbolt 3 (USB-C 3.1 Gen 2 ) to use with your MacBook Pro which I think has that port. Or connect them to devices with USB C / 3.1 gen 2 ports.

Not 100% sure on this but I think in many cases TRIM does not work over USB on external SSDs. Which is essential in proper function and longevity of SSDs. I'd ask @USAFRet to kindly verify this whenever he can.
 

britpoprule

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Checking prices on amazon uk
1) WD Blue 3D NAND Internal SSD 2.5 Inch SATA - 1 TB
£121
+ the adapter around £15
https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B073SBQMCX/ref=twister_B07SSC2LB6?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1

or
2) Samsung SSD 860 QVO 1TB
£99.80
+ the adapter
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Samsung-SSD-860-QVO-1TB/dp/B07KSHCG3R/ref=sr_1_3?crid=2E6S40TNRV6JV&keywords=ssd+1tb&qid=1562710717&s=gateway&sprefix=ssd+,aps,140&sr=8-3&th=1

or
3) Kingston SSD A400 Solid State Drive (2.5 Inch SATA 3), 960 GB
£89.97
+ the adapter
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Kingston-SA400S37-960G-Solid-State/dp/B079XC5PVV/ref=sr_1_15?crid=2E6S40TNRV6JV&keywords=ssd+1tb&qid=1562710717&s=gateway&sprefix=ssd+,aps,140&sr=8-15

OR
4) The price of this external/portable hard drive
Samsung MU-PA1T0B/EU Portable SSD T5 1TB
£153
https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B074M774TW/ref=ox_sc_saved_title_1?smid=A3LVFI2KQNHQU4&psc=1

In conclusion solution 4 is better than 1 or 2. To save £20/30 I guess it's not worth the hassle. Much better an external hard drive.
But with solution 3 I would save around £50.
What do you think?
 
Jul 9, 2019
15
0
10
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Checking prices on amazon uk
1) WD Blue 3D NAND Internal SSD 2.5 Inch SATA - 1 TB
£121
+ the adapter around £15
https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B073SBQMCX/ref=twister_B07SSC2LB6?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1

or
2) Samsung SSD 860 QVO 1TB
£99.80
+ the adapter
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Samsung-SSD-860-QVO-1TB/dp/B07KSHCG3R/ref=sr_1_3?crid=2E6S40TNRV6JV&keywords=ssd+1tb&qid=1562710717&s=gateway&sprefix=ssd+,aps,140&sr=8-3&th=1

or
3) Kingston SSD A400 Solid State Drive (2.5 Inch SATA 3), 960 GB
£89.97
+ the adapter
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Kingston-SA400S37-960G-Solid-State/dp/B079XC5PVV/ref=sr_1_15?crid=2E6S40TNRV6JV&keywords=ssd+1tb&qid=1562710717&s=gateway&sprefix=ssd+,aps,140&sr=8-15

OR
4) The price of this external/portable hard drive
Samsung MU-PA1T0B/EU Portable SSD T5 1TB
£153
https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B074M774TW/ref=ox_sc_saved_title_1?smid=A3LVFI2KQNHQU4&psc=1

In conclusion solution 4 is better than 1 or 2. To save £20/30 I guess it's not worth the hassle. Much better an external hard drive.
But with solution 3 I would save around £50.
What do you think?
Well if price is your main factor , I would go with option 3 and plus , I will say this again , you will not need to worry about SSD if it falls because as comment about yours stated , SSD doesnt have any mechanical parts inside which can be easily damaged .
 

Satan-IR

Honorable
Checking prices on amazon uk
1) WD Blue 3D NAND Internal SSD 2.5 Inch SATA - 1 TB
£121
+ the adapter around £15
https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B073SBQMCX/ref=twister_B07SSC2LB6?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1

or
2) Samsung SSD 860 QVO 1TB
£99.80
+ the adapter
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Samsung-SSD-860-QVO-1TB/dp/B07KSHCG3R/ref=sr_1_3?crid=2E6S40TNRV6JV&keywords=ssd+1tb&qid=1562710717&s=gateway&sprefix=ssd+,aps,140&sr=8-3&th=1

or
3) Kingston SSD A400 Solid State Drive (2.5 Inch SATA 3), 960 GB
£89.97
+ the adapter
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Kingston-SA400S37-960G-Solid-State/dp/B079XC5PVV/ref=sr_1_15?crid=2E6S40TNRV6JV&keywords=ssd+1tb&qid=1562710717&s=gateway&sprefix=ssd+,aps,140&sr=8-15

OR
4) The price of this external/portable hard drive
Samsung MU-PA1T0B/EU Portable SSD T5 1TB
£153
https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B074M774TW/ref=ox_sc_saved_title_1?smid=A3LVFI2KQNHQU4&psc=1

In conclusion solution 4 is better than 1 or 2. To save £20/30 I guess it's not worth the hassle. Much better an external hard drive.
But with solution 3 I would save around £50.
What do you think?
If price is not an issue, go for the 4) Samsung which is meant as an external storage device and you won't have to go through the hassle of finding the right adapter/enclosure and connecting it.

Kingston SSDs can't compare with Samsung when it comes to longevity and quality and well performance is a function of quality. Otherwise Kingston would put a higher price tag on them so somehow in order to remain competitive in the market they have to be cheaper.

Anyway it's your choice and the difference is not really small. If you don't want to spend that much I'd suggest get the 2) Samsung not others.
 
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popatim

Titan
Moderator
Not 100% sure on this but I think in many cases TRIM does not work over USB on external SSDs. Which is essential in proper function and longevity of SSDs. I'd ask @USAFRet to kindly verify this whenever he can.
You'll need an external enclosure with UASP and a usb3 connection to get trim over usb. My Sabrent dock does.
SSD's do have an internal 'Garbage Collection" routine that works somewhat like Trim but you'll need to leave the drive " powered up and not being used" regularly to get it to run; just like in the days before Trim. LoL
 
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Satan-IR

Honorable
You'll need an external enclosure with UASP and a usb3 connection to get trim over usb. My Sabrent dock does.
SSD's do have an internal 'Garbage Collection" routine that works somewhat like Trim but you'll need to leave the drive " powered up and not being used" regularly to get it to run; just like in the days before Trim. LoL

Yes I was thinking there was an abbreviated word for the technology and wanted to tell OP unless the adapter/enclosure has that but couldn't remember it lol. UASP! Thanks.
 

popatim

Titan
Moderator
That depends on you. You know how 'prone' accidents are where you are. I use HDD's and BDR's for my backup media. I've too much data (family photo's & videos) to store on the cloud and SSD's do not have the retention capability that an HDD has. They can start corrupting data in as little as a couple weeks unless refreshed.
 

britpoprule

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Jul 5, 2015
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That depends on you. You know how 'prone' accidents are where you are. I use HDD's and BDR's for my backup media. I've too much data (family photo's & videos) to store on the cloud and SSD's do not have the retention capability that an HDD has. They can start corrupting data in as little as a couple weeks unless refreshed.
I only had one external hard drive (Western Digital My Book Studio), and never had a problem with it. Unfortunately due to the design which made it stand like a tower (rather than lye down flat), after many years, it fell flat on the table and the heads were damaged etc.
I suppose that a hard drive with a safer design it would be much safer.
So I understand that you would go with a HDD or BDR rather than an SSD.
PS
What is a BDR?
 

cat1092

Distinguished
Dec 28, 2009
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Regardless of drive purchased, the best way to get an external is build it yourself, as the retail packaged ones of today does not have a SATA interface if disassembled. Meaning if a retail one model, if dropped & something like a solder joint breaks, the drive is useless & data lost. One would have to pay far more than the drive is worth to recover any data & the charge will be higher than that of a traditional SATA based model.

Purchase any 3.5" recommended brand (based on reviews) 1 to 2TB HDD on pomo & a 3.5" USB 3.0 powered enclosure. Of if you prefer smaller, go with a 2.5" drive & enclosure, it'll be self powered from the USB port. You'll likely be limited to mainly 1TB tops with the 2.5" enclosures (& you need capacity). The cost of enclosure will also be less with 2.5", although with either choice, make sure the body is metal, as plastic ones will cause the drive to overheat during long backups. The metal helps to get of heat faster.

I don't recommend a SSD for backup, unless there's an eSATA port on the computer (& enclosure has an eSATA port to connect), because w/out a SATA connection, there'll be no TRIM or garbage collection. Both are needed for performance & longevity of the drive. Yes I know SSD's are at all time lows in pricing, however many of these are of low quality (some w/out physical DRAM) & won't last long as a backup drive. Am not sure why some of the OEM's are introducing these for portable use due to the lack of TRIM & GC being available. Maybe their goal is to sell more drives due to short lifespan.

I still have my first two SSD's in usage since 2012 (128GB Crucial m4 & 180GB Intel 330), installed in notebooks & running fine. If these were in enclosures, would be dead today. The Crucial m4 still has 98% lifespan & Intel 330 100%.

Here's a couple of recommendations.

https://www.amazon.com/Seagate-BarraCuda-Internal-Drive-3-5-Inch/dp/B07H2RR55Q/ref=sr_1_9?keywords=3.5"+HDD+external+enclosure&qid=1566121567&s=electronics&sr=1-9

Fast drive, great price for 2TB!

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00UAA4J6G?aaxitk=w9qcgExm2AnVjkN78FEEWw&pd_rd_i=B00UAA4J6G&pf_rd_p=9420597b-7dad-4cbd-a28d-7d676ac67378&hsa_cr_id=5475279960701&sb-ci-n=productDescription&sb-ci-v=Inateck 3.5 Hard Drive Enclosure, Aluminum USB 3.0 Sata HDD Enclosure, FE3001

That's the type of USB 3.0 port which is best, there's another slim type cable that gives trouble. Any that's shaped like this is good.

Good Luck! :)

Cat
 

britpoprule

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Jul 5, 2015
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I'm sorry friends, but I'm still confused.
I'd like to buy a 2TB and it looks like there's some promotions on amazon at the moment.
I've been reading again your posts but due to my ignorance I would like to ask a few things again.

Normal hard drives have mechanical parts, so they can fail, but compared to SSDs they are more reliable in keeping data intact through the years.
(What do you think of this Toshiba?)
https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07994QL95/ref=twister_B07SPXSPZ7?_encoding=UTF8&th=1

SSDs do not have mechanical parts, but data can become corrupt easily? What does it mean? And does it happen automatically, even if you don't do anything wrong?
(What do you think of this Samsung? 2TB costs £243 but 1TB costs £113. So maybe if I buy two 1TB it would be cheaper than buying the 2TB).
https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B074M774TW/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?smid=A3P5ROKL5A1OLE&th=1

Thanks a lot
 

Gam3r01

Titan
Moderator
Given that youve already killed one external HDD from a drop, I would go SSD just for safety.

Sure an HDD might last longer/hold data longer without use, but these devices shouldnt be your only copy of the info.
HDD or SSD, if it dies replace it and backup the data again from the other storage location.

For me, it makes far more sense to have an external SSD (though I cant afford one yet), lets say some emergency arises and you have to leave now. You can throw an SSD in a bag and get out, an HDD would be exponentially more likely to fail due to rough handling. Im not concerned about random failure rates, because my important pictures live on my HDD, laptop HDD, external HDD (eventually SSD), and phone. The chances of all 4 locations failing at the same time is near impossible.
 

britpoprule

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Jul 5, 2015
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Given that youve already killed one external HDD from a drop, I would go SSD just for safety.

Sure an HDD might last longer/hold data longer without use, but these devices shouldnt be your only copy of the info.
HDD or SSD, if it dies replace it and backup the data again from the other storage location.

For me, it makes far more sense to have an external SSD (though I cant afford one yet), lets say some emergency arises and you have to leave now. You can throw an SSD in a bag and get out, an HDD would be exponentially more likely to fail due to rough handling. Im not concerned about random failure rates, because my important pictures live on my HDD, laptop HDD, external HDD (eventually SSD), and phone. The chances of all 4 locations failing at the same time is near impossible.
Thanks for the answer.
Just for the record, if my hard drive hadn't had that vertical tower design, that no other hard drive has, I doubt that I would have ever killed it. It didn't fall on the floor. It fell flat on the same table it was standing.

Going back to the Samsung SSD, would you buy two 1TB or one 2TB.
Buying two 1TB would make me save about £16, not that much.
 

Gam3r01

Titan
Moderator
Well that does sound like a bad design.

As for the SSD: That depends on your specific need. Its going to be more trouble trying to manage data on two drives, think years down the line "okay which drive was it on again?" as well as more wear and tear on the ports swapping them around. Two drives would be ideal for a backup, having a copy on both drives.

How much data do you have to back up? If its anywhere close to 1TB you would probably want the larger drive.
 
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