[SOLVED] Advice on Setting up two home WiFi network

Sep 13, 2019
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I am currently using:
1) an Arris SB6190 Cable Modem connected to a 4-port Gigabit Switch.
2) The Switch has
a) A Samsung Smart TV is hardwired to the switch and
b) A Google WiFi that is used to directly connect a Ring Doorbell and several Ring Floodlight Cameras (Without the Ring Chime Pro Extenders) as well as the regular tablets, cell phones and computers.

Problem: My Google mesh WiFi gets knocked offline frequently.
a) Partly due to a Signal/Noise Ratio higher than most (The Cable Company is going to troubleshoot that) and
b) Partly due to a compatibility issue with Ring Products with the Google mesh WiFi (According to Google Technical support.

I am thinking to separate isolate the Ring Network like this:
Hard wired to the Switch:
a) Samsung Smart TV
b) Google WiFi for everything except the Ring products
c) A new Standard 802.11 ac dual band gigabit WiFi router connected to the Ring Chime Pro Network Extenders and the Cameras.

Question:
Will the Standard 802.11 ac router and the Google mesh WiFi co-exist without making another problem? Any thoughts from anyone setting up two home WiFi and Mesh WiFi in the same sandbox?
 
I can not see how you got that to work.

Your connection must go modem--router--switch. You only get a single IP from most ISP and a router is the device that allows you to share that ip. A switch connected to the router will only allow a single device to get a IP and the other devices will not work.

The first thing to remember is mesh is just another name for repeater it has all many of the problems the other systems have. You do not want to use any form or repeater if there are other options. Part of your wifi problems is having all these different devices transmitting extra radio signals.

Best if you can run with 1 central router and all your equipment connect to it. The next option is what is called a AP. This is a remote radio connected via ethernet. You so called mesh units can run as AP also. Only as your very last resort do you use repeaters. Placement is critical they must be placed where they can get good signal but still retransmit the signal to the remote devices.
 
I can not see how you got that to work.

Your connection must go modem--router--switch. You only get a single IP from most ISP and a router is the device that allows you to share that ip. A switch connected to the router will only allow a single device to get a IP and the other devices will not work.

The first thing to remember is mesh is just another name for repeater it has all many of the problems the other systems have. You do not want to use any form or repeater if there are other options. Part of your wifi problems is having all these different devices transmitting extra radio signals.

Best if you can run with 1 central router and all your equipment connect to it. The next option is what is called a AP. This is a remote radio connected via ethernet. You so called mesh units can run as AP also. Only as your very last resort do you use repeaters. Placement is critical they must be placed where they can get good signal but still retransmit the signal to the remote devices.
 
You get one IP address from the modem so the Google Mesh should work fine until you turn on the TV, LoL.

Your one device it sees should be the router, which can redistribute the connection to hundreds of devices. A managed switch could do the same, if for some reason you really don't want an AP in the same box as the router. Because it's cheaper and usually easier to set up, most people would use a router next to the modem and wire the Mesh AP on the other side of the house. A single wired Mesh device is just going to function as an AP with no repeating.
 

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