[SOLVED] Advice z690 more long-lived, long-lasting and reliable over time

Grealish01

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good evening, i know that the title is a bit limited as it is impossible to classify the z690s with this criterion as they came out 3 months ago. But what I would like to try to understand which is the most reliable brand that has statistically produced motherboards over time with the lowest possible error rate and with fewer problems and breaks among all manufacturers, which have lasted a long, long time.
 

Karadjgne

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There's no way to answer the question. Even failure rates are suspect. Failure rates are typically a ratio of the amount of RMA's received for any given product.

Take for instance the Corsair CX-430. Extremely cheap psu that was decent for what it was and was intended for. Mass produced like crazy. It's actual failure rate was massively higher than its reported failure rate, Corsair counted failures as being returns, but as cheap as it was and as popular world wide, actual returns were minimal. If it broke, ppl just junked it and bought something else. A warranty return on a $30 psu and the turn around time simply wasn't worth the effort. The amount of returns vs amount of sales, the reported failure rate was tiny by comparison.

That didn't make it a good buy, a quality item, nor reliable and dependable for a gaming pc.

Also take volume into consideration, especially with reddit, YouTube, Tom's etc available. If you assume a 1% failure rate, seems small, tiny even, but if 1 million boards are sold, that's 10,000 unhappy ppl, many of which will post their woes. If only 100,000 boards are sold, that's a measly 1000 unhappy ppl, so a Lot less woeful stories hit the web, and the board looks like a much better deal in comparison.

Everything made by man has a failure rate, things break, happens, and there's no saying when. Asus has a decent track record, mid-grade or better MSI is good, Gigabyte same, ASRock was decent but seem to be slipping lately. I'd stay away from the budget offerings, to lower prices vs competitors, corners by necessity get cut more than is healthy.
 
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Grealish01

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Jan 22, 2022
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good evening, i know that the title is a bit limited as it is impossible to classify the z690s with this criterion as they came out 3 months ago. But what I would like to try to understand which is the most reliable brand that has statistically produced motherboards over time with the lowest possible error rate and with fewer problems and breaks among all manufacturers, which have lasted a long, long time.
if you know of sites (like Puget systems) that analyze the error rates of mobos you would do me a favor if you would link them here in thred
 
in the sense that it must have many power phases? you mean that
Yes but you can't necessarily go on that as different motherboards will use different quality components and manufacturers can be a little naughty in how they market things. I would pick a board that is well reviewed and confirmed to be of good quality. I would not pick the cheapest Z690 you can find.
 
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Karadjgne

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Ambassador
There's no way to answer the question. Even failure rates are suspect. Failure rates are typically a ratio of the amount of RMA's received for any given product.

Take for instance the Corsair CX-430. Extremely cheap psu that was decent for what it was and was intended for. Mass produced like crazy. It's actual failure rate was massively higher than its reported failure rate, Corsair counted failures as being returns, but as cheap as it was and as popular world wide, actual returns were minimal. If it broke, ppl just junked it and bought something else. A warranty return on a $30 psu and the turn around time simply wasn't worth the effort. The amount of returns vs amount of sales, the reported failure rate was tiny by comparison.

That didn't make it a good buy, a quality item, nor reliable and dependable for a gaming pc.

Also take volume into consideration, especially with reddit, YouTube, Tom's etc available. If you assume a 1% failure rate, seems small, tiny even, but if 1 million boards are sold, that's 10,000 unhappy ppl, many of which will post their woes. If only 100,000 boards are sold, that's a measly 1000 unhappy ppl, so a Lot less woeful stories hit the web, and the board looks like a much better deal in comparison.

Everything made by man has a failure rate, things break, happens, and there's no saying when. Asus has a decent track record, mid-grade or better MSI is good, Gigabyte same, ASRock was decent but seem to be slipping lately. I'd stay away from the budget offerings, to lower prices vs competitors, corners by necessity get cut more than is healthy.
 
Last edited:

Grealish01

Great
BANNED
Jan 22, 2022
224
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There's no way to answer the question. Even failure rates are suspect. Failure rates are typically a ratio of the amount of RMA's received for any given product.

Take for instance the Corsair CX-430. Extremely cheap psu that was decent for what it was and was intended for. Mass produced like crazy. It's actual failure rate was massively higher than its reported failure rate, Corsair counted failures as being returns, but as cheap as it was and as popular world wide, actual returns were minimal. If it broke, ppl just junked it and bought something else. A warranty return on a $30 psu and the turn around time simply wasn't worth the effort. The amount of returns vs amount of sales, the reported failure rate was tiny by comparison.

That didn't make it a good buy, a quality item, nor reliable and dependable for a gaming pc.

Also take volume into consideration, especially with reddit, YouTube, Tom's etc available. If you assume a 1% failure rate, seems small, tiny even, but if 1 million boards are sold, that's 10,000 unhappy ppl, many of which will post their woes. If only 100,000 boards are sold, that's a measly 1000 unhappy ppl, so a Lot less woeful stories hit the web, and the board looks like a much better deal in comparison.

Everything made by man has a failure rate, things break, happens, and there's no saying when. Asus has a decent track record, mid-grade or better MSI is good, Gigabyte same, ASRock was decent but seem to be slipping lately. I'd stay away from the budget offerings, to lower prices vs competitors, corners by necessity get cut more than is healthy.
thanks, very clear the concept. Regarding the Track record between MSI, Asus and gigabyte which is the best?
 

USAFRet

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Mar 16, 2013
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Statistics mean little, when it is YOUR device that fails.

According to BackBlaze, the 16TB Toshiba Enterprise has 0.00% fail.

Yet....I have a replacement for mine, being delivered today.
Failed after 7 months.
Was under no extreme stress or heat...just in the NAS box as one might expect of an Enterprise drive.
 

Why_Me

Champion
what are the differences of the vrm?
Usually the Asus Prime series boards lack in the VRM category but not so much with their Z690 boards. I'm pleasantly surprised.

https://www.asus.com/Motherboards-Components/Motherboards/TUF-Gaming/TUF-GAMING-Z690-PLUS-WIFI-D4/
14+1 DrMOS, six-layer PCB, ProCool sockets, alloy chokes and durable capacitors for stable power delivery.

https://www.asus.com/Motherboards-Components/Motherboards/PRIME/PRIME-Z690-P-D4/
14+1 DrMOS, 8+4 pin ProCool connector, alloy chokes and durable capacitors for stable power delivery.
 
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