System32_76

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Jul 29, 2019
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Hello everyone, I'm wondering if it's ok to use an air compressor for cleaning out PCs?

I know using vacuums have ESD risks and since I'll be constantly cleaning out PCs,
I don't want to keep buying canned air all the time.
 

gardenman

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Thank you for the info, but my main concern was if air compressors generate ESD or not. Do they do that?
I can't say for sure, but it's my guess that anything that can hold a charge can cause ESD, including air compressors... and compressed air cans. Maybe this thread will help: https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/does-air-compressor-produce-esd/

I have in the past used vacuum cleaners and compressed air at the same time. I've never had any ESD problems.

ESD is over hyped. Be careful, watch what you are doing, ground yourself when possible and you'll never have any problems. An easy way to ground yourself is by leaving the PC plugged in and touching the metal shroud of the PSU.
 

gardenman

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That will depend on the pressure coming out of the nozzle. Some are adjustable. If it's too much, it could very well damage the motherboard or other parts within the PC. There's no way to determine what "too much" will be. Each motherboard or PC part is made differently and can take varying amounts of air pressure before damage. Some compressor's also have water or moisture in the air.

There are other "middle of the road" options. Look up "XPOWER Duster" or "DataVac Duster". There are other such dusters too.
 

Phillip Corcoran

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Moisture/Water in the compressed air shooting out without warning has to be the main worry with using a compressor. Personally I would never consider using one for PC component cleaning.

You can buy a pack of four or six "4-Star" air duster cans from Amazon -- works out cheaper than a single can.
 
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System32_76

Commendable
Jul 29, 2019
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That will depend on the pressure coming out of the nozzle. Some are adjustable. If it's too much, it could very well damage the motherboard or other parts within the PC. There's no way to determine what "too much" will be. Each motherboard or PC part is made differently and can take varying amounts of air pressure before damage. Some compressor's also have water or moisture in the air.

There are other "middle of the road" options. Look up "XPOWER Duster" or "DataVac Duster". There are other such dusters too.
Thank you for the info, but my main concern was if air compressors generate ESD or not. Do they do that?
 

mortemas

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You can get a "dryer" for the air compressor to deal with the moisture. They range in price from a $12 inline model to upwards of $1500 for a floor standing unit, but we have one at work that mounts on the wall and that style can be found for less than $100 and seems to be the middle of the road solution. Here's one example:
https://www.lowes.com/pd/Campbell-Hausfeld-Air-Cleaner-Dryer/1001057794?cm_mmc=shp-_-c-_-prd-_-tol-_-google-_-pla-_--_-sospneu/air/rotaryshopequip-_-1001057794-_-0&cm_mmc=src-_-c-_-prd-_-tol-_-google-_-tools-_-PLA_TOL_Tools_High Priority-_--_-0-_-0&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI_7-CtI3-5QIVC2yGCh1HEQr1EAkYCSABEgIR3vD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds
 

gardenman

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Thank you for the info, but my main concern was if air compressors generate ESD or not. Do they do that?
I can't say for sure, but it's my guess that anything that can hold a charge can cause ESD, including air compressors... and compressed air cans. Maybe this thread will help: https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/does-air-compressor-produce-esd/

I have in the past used vacuum cleaners and compressed air at the same time. I've never had any ESD problems.

ESD is over hyped. Be careful, watch what you are doing, ground yourself when possible and you'll never have any problems. An easy way to ground yourself is by leaving the PC plugged in and touching the metal shroud of the PSU.
 

System32_76

Commendable
Jul 29, 2019
110
2
1,585
0
I can't say for sure, but it's my guess that anything that can hold a charge can cause ESD, including air compressors... and compressed air cans. Maybe this thread will help: https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/does-air-compressor-produce-esd/

I have in the past used vacuum cleaners and compressed air at the same time. I've never had any ESD problems.

ESD is over hyped. Be careful, watch what you are doing, ground yourself when possible and you'll never have any problems. An easy way to ground yourself is by leaving the PC plugged in and touching the metal shroud of the PSU.
Thank you for the ESD info! I'm most likely considering buying this here and not use a vacuum or air compressor:
https://www.amazon.com/Metro-Vacuum-ED500P-500-Watt-Electric/dp/B001U899HQ/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=metro+vacuum+ed500&qid=1574442906&sr=8-1&th=1
 

gardenman

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That looks like a good one. Be sure to look up reviews of a few of them, on YouTube or Google or elsewhere.

I've had this one in my Amazon shopping cart a few months. I just haven't ordered it yet. I can't remember why I chose that one and I might change my mind when I do order. I also am tired of compressed air cans.
 

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