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[SOLVED] Air conditioning moisture effect on PC?

Jul 4, 2020
43
1
35
0
Hi
I am new at PCs and I just built a PC and it's kept in my bedroom, I live in a hotter area (around 40°C in summers) so I have to leave the air conditioning on all night. This causes my floor and other objects in my room to have moisture deposits on them in the morning, like the floor becomes slippery and all, and I cannot keep my PC on all night because we also have electricity issues sometimes. I have been covering my PC and monitor with a thick cloth during the nights since a couple weeks to stop moisture from getting in there. Is there a more viable alternative, because this seems kinda stupid but also might work, but again I'm concerned about static electricity? Will my parts be damaged if I don't cover the PC in the long run? Pls help and provide some input!
 

DSzymborski

Champion
Moderator
So I noticed the filters were pretty dirty, ive cleaned those and I also saw on the internet that lower fan speed can help decrease humidity faster, I'll try that tonight and see what happens, thanks!
Yeah, moisture should be draining out of the air conditioner somewhere, whether it's a box or central air. Like in the furnace/ac area of my laundry room, you'll water running out through the drain from the air conditioner.

Essentially, when air hits the cold evaporator coil, humidity will condense on the coil and then drain from there.
 
Reactions: Prad_Bitt

DSzymborski

Champion
Moderator
Just make sure it's a lint-free cloth over it.

I'd be more concerned about the air conditioning problem. A proper functioning air conditioner should be removing moisture from the environment, not leaving moisture deposits. That suggests an improperly installed air conditioner system or one that's oversized for the area (shorter cycling so it cools down the room to the target temperature before removing moisture).
 
Jul 4, 2020
43
1
35
0
Just make sure it's a lint-free cloth over it.

I'd be more concerned about the air conditioning problem. A proper functioning air conditioner should be removing moisture from the environment, not leaving moisture deposits. That suggests an improperly installed air conditioner system or one that's oversized for the area (shorter cycling so it cools down the room to the target temperature before removing moisture).
So I noticed the filters were pretty dirty, ive cleaned those and I also saw on the internet that lower fan speed can help decrease humidity faster, I'll try that tonight and see what happens, thanks!
 

DSzymborski

Champion
Moderator
So I noticed the filters were pretty dirty, ive cleaned those and I also saw on the internet that lower fan speed can help decrease humidity faster, I'll try that tonight and see what happens, thanks!
Yeah, moisture should be draining out of the air conditioner somewhere, whether it's a box or central air. Like in the furnace/ac area of my laundry room, you'll water running out through the drain from the air conditioner.

Essentially, when air hits the cold evaporator coil, humidity will condense on the coil and then drain from there.
 
Reactions: Prad_Bitt

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