"Alexis Sorokin" is a male name!

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In Russian, "Alexis" is a male-only name ("a-la french remix" of
"Alexey"). The closest female name is "Alexandra". And, as most of you
should already know, female second names in Russian usually end with
"-a" (see Tatiana Stepanova).
So, why she is "Alexis Sorokin" instead of "Alexandra Sorokina"?
Maybe, she is a male?
 
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"Ector" <Ector@mail.ru> wrote in message
news:1113236179.559989.253100@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> In Russian, "Alexis" is a male-only name ("a-la french remix" of
> "Alexey"). The closest female name is "Alexandra". And, as most of you
> should already know, female second names in Russian usually end with
> "-a" (see Tatiana Stepanova).
> So, why she is "Alexis Sorokin" instead of "Alexandra Sorokina"?
> Maybe, she is a male?

Ector,
Alexis is a nickname. It is a abrevation for Alexandra. The male version
is an abreviation for Alexandr.

Don't you speak Russian?

When dealing with patronymic (i.e. Russians' Middle Names), you derive the
name from the father's name. If the child is female the patronymic is a
"-ova" and if the child is male the patronymic is "-ovich". Therefore the
patronymic for Norman would either be Normanova for my daughter or
Normanovich for my son.

Alexis Sorokin is a given name and a surname without the patronymic being
included.


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Comments Welcome,
Norman S. Brown, Jr
XZealot
Archon of the Swamp
 
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"Ector" <Ector@mail.ru> wrote in message
news:1113236179.559989.253100@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> In Russian, "Alexis" is a male-only name ("a-la french remix" of
> "Alexey"). The closest female name is "Alexandra". And, as most of you
> should already know, female second names in Russian usually end with
> "-a" (see Tatiana Stepanova).
> So, why she is "Alexis Sorokin" instead of "Alexandra Sorokina"?
> Maybe, she is a male?
>

In English, the name was derived from Greek origin (also origianally male).
Unlike Russian and Greek pronunciations, English usage pronounces the '-is'
ending (my phonetic spelling is lax, but it sounds similar to ah-LEHK-sihs)
Its been on the rise in popularity over the last fifteen years as a girl's
name (probably due to the influence of television characters). In the US in
2002, Alexis was the 5th most common name chosen for infant girls;

http://www.babyzone.com/babynames/babynamedisplay.asp?ID=16828

Regards,
DaveZ
Baby Namer
 
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XZealot wrote:
> "Ector" <Ector@mail.ru> wrote in message
> news:1113236179.559989.253100@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> > In Russian, "Alexis" is a male-only name ("a-la french remix" of
> > "Alexey"). The closest female name is "Alexandra". And, as most of
you
> > should already know, female second names in Russian usually end
with
> > "-a" (see Tatiana Stepanova).
> > So, why she is "Alexis Sorokin" instead of "Alexandra Sorokina"?
> > Maybe, she is a male?
>
> Ector,
> Alexis is a nickname. It is a abrevation for Alexandra. The male
version
> is an abreviation for Alexandr.
>
> Don't you speak Russian?
Of course I do. After all, Russian is my native language :)

> When dealing with patronymic (i.e. Russians' Middle Names), you
derive the
> name from the father's name. If the child is female the patronymic
is a
> "-ova" and if the child is male the patronymic is "-ovich".
Therefore the
> patronymic for Norman would either be Normanova for my daughter or
> Normanovich for my son.
>
> Alexis Sorokin is a given name and a surname without the patronymic
being
> included.
Who speaks about patronymic (middle) names? "Sorokin" is clearly a
surname, and it should be "Sorokina".

Yours,
Ector
 
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> Who speaks abovt patronymic (middle) names? "Sorokin" is clearly a
> svrname, and it shovld be "Sorokina".

It took me 10 seconds to find ovt why.

from
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Names_in_Rvssian_Empire2C_Soviet_Union_and_CIS_covntries
"Family name (svrname) Svrnames, like Pvtin, Yel'tsin or Gorbachov,
generally fvnction in the same way that English svrnames do. They are
generally inherited from one's parents, althovgh (as with English
names)
women may adopt the svrname of their hvsband. Most Rvssian svrnames
have
different forms depending on gender
-for example, the wife of Boris Yel'tsin is Naina Yel'tsina. Note that
this
change of grammatical gender is a characteristic of East Slavic
langvages,
and is not
considered to be changing the name received from a woman's father or
hvsband
(compare the eqvivalent rvle in Czech). ***The correct transliteration
of
svch feminine names in English is debated: sometimes women's names are
given
in their original form, sometimes in the mascvline form (technically
incorrect, bvt more widely recognized).****"

So I hope this answers yovr qvestion. It's those damn transliterator's
favlt. :)
--
Comments Welcome,
Norman S. Brown, Jr
XZealot
Archon of the Swamp